CD hard drive caddy - good idea?

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OM2

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Just wanted some thoughts on a getting a CD hard drive caddy

I know they've been around for some time now

Can I use to have a different OS like Linux?

That would be pretty good

Are there any downfalls?
Are they reliable?

Thanks


OM
 

Oddba11

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What exactly are you referring to?

Removable enclosures for HDD's are fairly dependable. The weak point is typically the connector. So the more it's removed/installed, the greater the change of failure.
 

OM2

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@oddba11, i'm referring to the replacing of a CD/DVD drive and replacing with a drive bay where you can put in an extra hard drive

if u can configure correctly, you can then boot into 2 different OS

see the image below... u can get these in ebay, amazon and other it websites



any comments?
thanks
 

managed

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I have one of those for a Sata hard drive and it will not let me boot an OS, I think it's because the Bios expects a CD/DVD and doesn't know what to do when it's a hard drive. It's fine for data use though.

It's quite easy to install more than one OS onto a hard drive by partitioning it and using a bootmanager. If you just want different versions of Windows that's even easier; if you install the oldest first then later ones in order of their age Windows does it automatically.

If you want to try out different linux distros just use a live CD/DVD, they don't need installation, everything runs from the CD/DVD
 

OM2

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@managed, thanks for the reply
>> If you want to try out different linux distros just use a live CD/DVD,
>> they don't need installation, everything runs from the CD/DVD
does that include accessing files?
how do you save any settings you apply?
do you actually do this to run seriously to do specific tasks or something?
let me know
thanks :)
 

managed

Allan
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You can access all the files on the internal hard drive(s) from most live linux CD/DVD sessions. If you want to copy any files, maybe from a computer that won't boot up to a Windows OS, you will have to provide a place to put them like a CD/DVD writeable disk or an internal/external hard drive or a Usb stick.

You can run the live linux from a Usb stick although that usually needs a bit of extra setting up but then you can save any files you need onto that same Usb stick.

Normally you can't save settings in a live linux but some distros let you do so if running on a Usb stick, Puppy Linux does that and is a good choice if you want to try a small easy to use version of linux. It can run on quite old computers and is very fast because it runs entirely in Ram.

Do you have a particular goal in mind or do you just want to try things out ?
 

OM2

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just want to try things out. nothing mission critical :)

puppy?
my first choice would have been ubuntu - only because it's the one i hear most

i was planning on buying a mini usb 3.0 stick for the linux
should i do some checking to make sure it works with my laptop for example?
if using a usb stick - assume, ok to write files and save settings?

+ while i'm asking about linux (i know i've gone away from my original question)...
how about drivers?? how does the linux OS know what settings there are?
and what if i want to print? how do i install the printer driver?
even if easy to install - does that mean u always have to install each and everytime??

thanks!
 

managed

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I suggest you use this free program for Usb sticks :- http://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal-usb-installer-easy-as-1-2-3/

It's very easy to use and will offer 'persistence' if the linux you choose supports it, which means you can save any changed settings when you finish a session.

Puppy is a nice easy to use version of linux, by default it will save your session changes. Ubuntu is a more complete OS but might be a bit overwhelming at first. You can try both and any other you fancy though.

If your computer has built-in Usb 3 ports I think you will be able to boot a Usb 3 stick at full speed. I have a Usb 3 express card adapter in this laptop I'm typing on but I can't boot from it, I have to put a Usb 3 stick into one of it's Usb 2 slots to boot it which is slower but not too bad. It will work at full Usb 3 speed when I'm in Windows 7 and should do so in linux if it has Usb 3 drivers.

Linux is very good at detecting the hardware and usually everything just works, even wireless and sound. If something doesn't work you can usually find the drivers you need online.

EDIT : I'm not sure about printers, I've never tried but maybe someone else will answer that one.
 

OM2

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thanks for the detailed reply :)

pendrivelinux: does it have PUPs?
how hard is it to get the puppy linux and/or ubuntu iso's and make a bootable usb stick?

thanks
 

managed

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It's easy using the program I linked to. Give it a try and you will see all the different linux distros you can put on a Usb stick with it. You can have a look even if you don't have a Usb stick yet.

EDIT : Yes it includes Puppy and Ubuntu and a lot more.

EDIT the 2nd : have a read at the link webpage, it tells you all you need to know.
 

OM2

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thanks - i looked at puppylinux. they say u can create a bootable usb stick from the CD

i did look at the web page - all looks good
but i was worried about PUPs - 'potentially unwanted programs'
(i learned this acronym just today!)
if everyone is using - then ok most likely?

QUESTION: forgetting all other factors... what is the most good looking interface for the linux distributions? or is it a case of getting a different theme? what's the most user friendly/fancy looking out of the box?

thanks
 

managed

Allan
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The pendrivelinux.com website is trustworthy. If you use the program from there you don't need to burn a CD, the program lists many linux distros when you click the drop-down arrow and you pick the one you want, it will download it for you then you just do the other steps and it makes the Usb bootable and puts the linux files onto it, It couldn't be easier.

If you don't have a Usb stick yet you could burn an Iso to a CD/DVD and try a distro that way. I would use a re-writeable disk if you have any, that way if you don't like a distro you can burn another to the same disk. Pick the Live option when you boot the disk (usually the default) and nothing is changed on the hard drive(s), it runs from the CD and/or the Ram and when you finish it's as if nothing happened, the computer will be exactly the same as it was before you ran linux.

(btw distro is short for distribution and just means a particular version of linux, there are lots of different ones).

EDIT : I think Linux Mint is nice looking and fairly easy to use :- http://www.linuxmint.com
The choice is for which desktop you want, there are several different ones but I would go for Cinnamon, it's the newest.
 
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