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change mobo: possible/worth it?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Dre0745, Mar 19, 2005.

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  1. Dre0745

    Dre0745 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2004
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    Hi.
    Ok, my question is the following:
    My computer is an old IBM, with a PIII running at 598Mhz, 383mb RAM, and two HD's.
    I know some of you might say well... just buy a new computer, well I did, but I still want to keep this one with me, since I want it in my room, since the new computer is basicly for the whole family.
    Now my quesiton is, can I go and change the mobo a P4 mobo, an Asus P4S800D-X and a Pentium Celeron "Intel Celeron(Pentium 4 based) 1.8 GHz 400MHz FSB, 128K Cache ". Of course changing this two would mean changing the PS as well which I would change for a Antec SL400 400W. And buy new RAM since this one needs DDR and the one I had was SDRAM, it would be a Kingston (don't know which one yet though).
    I would be changing to that from a mobo that is a IBM 66M2, PIII 598MHZ and 383Mb SDRAM.
    The whole change would be under 300 dollars, and even less than 250$.
    Now the question is, is it worth it? And if it is, how do I do it?
    The thing is that, i don't know if you only have to change the motherboards around and Windows, when you start your computer will notice it and make the necessary changes or you have to reinstall windows so it will work.
    Thanks for your patience, I appreciate any comments and suggestions.

    Dre0745

    PS: I have WinXP Pro w/ SP1.
     
  2. kiwiguy

    kiwiguy

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2003
    Messages:
    17,584
    You will have to reinstall Windows or the PC will Blue screen when it boots, as it will be feeding all the wrong drivers to the motherboard.

    Does the IBM case (which is all you are keeping apart from the monitor and keyboard) accept a standard size PSU?

    Is it any cheaper than just doing a "swap-a-box"?

    Remember that if your copy of XP is OEM, and belongs to the IBM it may not activate on another installation. If they are "recovery disks only" it certainly will not.
     
  3. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    A clean install is the best way to do this. Backup what you want to keep ie docs, data, etc and do a clean install of xp. Note you must have a full version of xp to do the following. If you have a "recovery" cd, it will not work.

    If you do not want to clean install, it is possible to do the swap without doing a clean install. Here are the instructions. With the old board still connected, start the system. During this process DO NOT reboot; just tell it later.

    1 Uninstall any software that is dependent on the old board such as onboard sound, nic, monitoring software.

    2 Go to device manager and remove any device that is dependent on the old board such as floppy drive, usb, etc.

    3 Most important change to a standard ide driver. This must be done manually in device manager.

    4 Disable [not uninstall] any anti-virus software.

    5 Now shutdown and do the swap

    6 Start the system and enter the bios. Set time, date, etc also set the CD as the first boot device. Save settings and restart with your xp cd in the drive. When you get the message to press any key to boot from cd, do so. Choose to install [not repair] windows from the first menu. The next menu will show any previous xp install and offer to repair it for you, let it do so. After the repair install, you will need to update to sp2 [unless your disk already has it] run windows update and update any security patches, hot fixes, etc. All data and installed apps will still be there.
     
  4. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    Messages:
    38,118
    BTW if you are going to do this, stay away from a sis chipset. Use a board with an intel chipset for an intel processor. You will have a lot fewer problems.

    Here is a better choice for an Asus board link
     
  5. n2gun

    n2gun

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2000
    Messages:
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    Personally, if I was going thru the trouble of changing the p/s I would just get a new case with the p/s already in it (not much difference is price). You then can use the hard drive, etc out of you old puter. Definitely format the hard drive though and do a clean install.
     
  6. Dre0745

    Dre0745 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2004
    Messages:
    185
    Thanks for your answers.
    I think I might just do a clean install... since I really need to reformat my HD anyways. The copy of XP I have is mine, I bought it after, so it has nothing to do with IBM, it's not a "recovery disk only" from IBM kiwiguy. And well, I don't know if the case will take it, so I might just go ahead and just buy a new case where I can fit all of this. Thanks for the link for the new mobo crjdriver. I will be using that one then.
    Yea, I'll do that n2gun, the problem is though, if I get one with a PS already in it, wouldn't it be a bad PS? or you can find a case with an Antec PS already in it?
    Thanks for all of your answers! :)

    Dre0745
     
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