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Charge a battery for the first time

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by chris0147, Sep 28, 2015.

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  1. chris0147

    chris0147 Thread Starter

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    Hey guys,

    I need your help, i bought a genuine battery for my laptop Toshiba Satellite A500, but it doesn't say much information on the manual so I want to know how long I need to charge up the battery for the first time?

    Do I need to put the battery on my laptop and switch on the adapter to charge it up without switch the laptop on?

    When I am using the laptop, do you know what is the per cent when the battery get low that I need to charge it up?

    Is it ok to charge the battery when the battery goes to near 10% or more when I'm using the laptop?

    And do I have to charge the battery 4 times in one day?

    I need to be careful as I don't want to damage the laptop battery that wont last to a year if i am not being careful.

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. DaveA

    DaveA Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    All of my laptops have a icon in the navigation area that shows battery status including charging.

    I would just install the new battery, connect the power supply and run the laptop using power for a day or leave plugged in and on over night.
     
  3. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    I would charge it to 100% the first time, but it's not mandatory.

    No. The battery will charge nicely regardless of whether the laptop is on or off.

    If it is convenient to plug it in, 99% (see below). If you need to run on battery only you can go as low as possible (being careful to not lose any work).

    Yes, but I don't really understand your question, unless you are talking about the old batteries that had a "memory."

    Today's laptop batteries don't have a memory, so it is not necessary to always charge them to 100% nor discharge them to near zero. What they do have is a set number of "cycles." By that I mean that a battery may be capable of completely charging and then discharging, say, 1,000 times. Each partial discharge also counts as a fraction. So, with that example you could discharge a battery half way (and then recharge it) 2,000 times. Thus, if it is convenient to use the laptop with it plugged in I (almost) always do so to "save" cycles for when I want to use the laptop on battery only.

    I think that having the laptop plugged in when it is sleeping, hibernating or off is a quick way to ruin a battery, so I try to remember to unplug in those situations (unless deliberately charging it up for future use). Not everybody agrees with this theory; they say that there is a regulator that prevents the battery from over-charging. I have anecdotal evidence that I am correct, but maybe the issue was a faulty regulator.
     
  4. chris0147

    chris0147 Thread Starter

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    Thank you very much for answered each of my question. :)

    The question that you don't really understand what I have asking for, what I meant is I wondered if it okay to charge the battery when the battery show as 10% or more as I don't want to cause the short circuit to make the battery life to go short. I hope it make sense?

    So what do you recommend me to charge up the battery when it shows 10% or something like that?

    Does the battery last up to 1 hour or 2 hours when I use it before I recharge it?

    However, I have read the manual somewhere as it said that when the battery get hotter that I use it in 8 hours by charging 4 times in one day, I would have to turn it off to change it to another battery?

    I'm only asking you something that I don't really know much about the laptop battery, because I bought three batteries and two of them don't last to a year, is that sound bad?

    I guess that it is probably why I had two batteries that don't last to a year as I didn't charge it up the batteries when they was brand new. Do you know if the battery life would last to a year or so?
     
  5. Microsuck

    Microsuck

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    The battery makers strongly suggest that when you have a new battery, completely charge it with the computer off, then use the computer on battery only until it is completely discharged, then charge it while off again, 3 times, to break in the new battery. You get that kind of info with a new, aftermarket battery, but not with a new computer. They make big money selling you replacement batteries.
     
  6. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    I agree with Microsuck's advice, but personally would not worry about whether I was using the computer during charging and might only do the complete discharge once or twice. But by "not worrying" I may not be taking the best care of the battery.

    I definitely plug in a laptop (or cell phone) with a new battery until the battery is completely charged. I do not rely on whatever charge is in the battery when it arrives. Battery life will depend on a lot of things, and I do not know how much impact the initial charging or not charging will have.

    Other than the initial cycles Microsuck described, or when you do that later to calibrate the meter, charge the battery when it is convenient to do so. That includes when the meter shows 10%, more than 10%, and especially when it says less than 10%.

    Depends on the quality and capability of the battery and on what you are doing with the laptop. If yours is only lasting 2 hours or less on a charge you are doing power hungry stuff and/or the battery is not very good.

    Yes, shut down the system to switch batteries. The few minutes you may save by not doing so is not worth the risk (expense and inconvenience) or ruining the device.

    So, you're saying that you use the laptop away from electrical power for an hour or two and then have to find a place to plug it in and charge the battery? And then you repeat that three more times in a day? Really suggest that you look into getting a better battery (which may require getting a better laptop). You haven't given us any indication of the use you make of the laptop, but you should be able to find something that will last four to eight hours on a charge.

    Sounds very bad to me. My worst experience was a battery that would last only 20 minutes on a charge after three years. But it only lasted about 2 1/2 hours on a charge when new, and I (inadvertently) did not provide the best treatment for it.
     
  7. Microsuck

    Microsuck

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    For the record, the charge capacity of lithium ion batteries decreases slightly every time they are recharged. The industry standard set the lifespan bottom limit at 80%, that is to say that when they rate the lifespan of the battery, they mean until it reaches only 80% of the capacity it did when it was new, they consider that expired. It's supposed to take a specified number of charges to reduce it that much. You are supposed to charge cycle them 3 times when they are new. They prefer to be stored in the discharged state, and are shipped in the discharged state. That doesn't mean dead, lithium batteries must never be discharged below 2.8v per cell for this type of battery, or they are ruined. You could keep running them past that point, and it will continue for a while, but they will never take a charge again. So the pack has a protection circuit board inside that cuts off the battery if it gets that low. It also cuts off the battery if it charges to 4.2V, the upper limit, or if the cells become more than .1v different form one another, known as out of balance. The board is supposed to balance charge them individually as well to keep that from happening. It's wired to each cell individually, as well as together in series as a pack. If any one of the cells goes bad, the entire thing will shut off. These batteries are extremely prone to failure if misused, and need that protection circuit for safe use. Your cellphone has that circuitry built into it. When lithium batteries do fail, they do so by exploding in a big ball of fire that usually burns your house down, too. It's ugly.
    When the laptop packs go, I break them open, and replace the cells inside with high quality, high capacity cells made in Japan. It's usually cheaper than buying a new pack, and makes a longer lasting, higher capacity pack than you can get any other way. That's what soldering irons are for. But boy, they sure do glue them together good to make it hard to do.
    The cells in just about every laptop ever made, save for a few very tiny Toshiba's (they also make batteries, so they make a special size) use ICR 18650 cells, stacked in parallel, and in series, usually six 2p3s, or eight 2p4s. Those straddle the barrier imposed by 16v capacitors. The next size is 26v caps, which cost more, so 3s laptops use 16v caps, 4s laptops need 26v caps. Power supplies also have to fall into one of those categories, under 16v for 3s, and over 18v, or so, for 4s packs. If you need to replace one with a universal, make sure you get the right range for your battery pack. 16v and 14v chargers will interchange, as will 18v and 20v, but never replace a 16v charger with an 18v one.
    The cell's ID number refers to the physical size of the batteries inside, 18650's are 18mm x 65mm long, so counting the cells in the pack is a matter of measuring it, and dividing by 18 and 65.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2015
  8. DaveBurnett

    DaveBurnett Account Closed

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