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Computer shuts down on its own

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by vinvinvinvin, Sep 26, 2019.

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  1. vinvinvinvin

    vinvinvinvin Thread Starter

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    First of all to all the mods. i would like to apologize if i have started this thread on the wrong forum. kindly move it to the correct one if required.

    Okay this is the issue im facing. It started about a week ago. I switched on the psu and push my power button and nothing worked. this is just out of the blue. i gave it a nudge and it worked. pc started working. a couple hours into gaming. it suddenly starts to shutdown on it own from this i concluded okay power button issue. opened the casing. took out the reset jumper and switched it with the power jumper. tried it and yes it started to work again and suddenly again after a few hours it shuts itself so then i figured maybe issue with the cable jumpers so i tried using a screwdriver instead and again it worked pc turned on used it a few hours and bam auto shuts itself.

    Could anyone help me out? i really dont want to be spending any money atm so if there is anything i can solve from home would be great. im currently starting this thread using the same pc which has the issue. the last time it ran as long as about 6.5 hours before it started to shutdown .

    Any help would be great.

    Thanks
    Vineet

    Edit : I also noticed one more thing everytime i switched on the PSU if my PC starts on it own then dies immediately then i know the power button / reset button not even the screwdriver will work. and another thing everytime it didnt light up means i know the power button will work but for some weird reason. it will always enter the bios.
     
  2. plodr

    plodr

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    90% of the time when a computer shuts down on its own, it is due to heat.

    Also, I suspect your power supply is marginal.
    Unfortunately, if you keep fooling with the power supply, one day it will fail to boot and you end up having no computer.

    Open it up, clean out the dust, make sure the CPU and graphics card are dust free and replace the power supply.
     
  3. Shazzalive

    Shazzalive

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    Before you go replacing the power supply I would suggest you ascertain whether the fault actually is in the power supply.

    I suggest that you test your RAM to make sure it's not a faulty stick of RAM causing the issue,
    following which I suggest you reseat and repaste your CPU cooler. This will involve removing all traces of the old heat paste from both the surface of the CPU and from the cooler, and reapplying fresh thermal paste before reinstalling the cooler.

    If neither of those efforts isolates the fault then I suggest that you disconnect your existing PSU and connect in a different PSU without actually replacing the unit. If your issue resolves itself then you'll have identified the problem to have been the PSU and you then remove the faulty installed but disconnected PSU and replace it.

    If it's none of those 3 things that are causing the issue then, although the problem remains, you haven't spent and/or wasted any or much money.

    You may find, though, at the end of the day, that you have to spend money to resolve the problem.

    Remember; the only free lunch is in a mousetrap.
     
  4. vinvinvinvin

    vinvinvinvin Thread Starter

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    Hey Plodr. Thanks for your reply. I will try to clean it up but i doubt its heat. I have 6 fans running and my room is preety cold.
     
  5. vinvinvinvin

    vinvinvinvin Thread Starter

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    Hey thanks for the advise. I will try get a used psu to try it out. However if its not ram and not the psu. Could it be the mobo?

    As no one addressed that.
     
  6. Shazzalive

    Shazzalive

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    It could indeed be the mobo; but let's eliminate the less-costly parts first.

    I suggest that you test the RAM and the PSU with everything that's unnecessary disconnected from the mobo. - Such as the optical drive if you have one. - Disconnect it. Same with a card reader. - If it's not absolutely necessary then disconnect it. If the problem stops when you have non-essentials disconnected then reconnect them individually, and when the fault recurs it was due to the last component that you reconnected.

    If the fault still occurs when all non-essentials are disconnected then you're left with RAM, PSU, mobo, and CPU.

    It's very unlikely that it's the CPU (Although not impossible.).

    Enjoy your detective work. ;)
     
  7. vinvinvinvin

    vinvinvinvin Thread Starter

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    thanks alot for the help. I will let you know what it is once i solve it haha.
     
  8. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    OK, no one [other than you] has any idea what hardware you are running. Post ALL of your exact system specs; ie exact motherboard, exact processor, exact pw supply, etc, etc. Do not post "500W pw supply" Post the exact brand and model# Do that for ALL of your parts.
    Next have you monitored temps and voltages? If not, do so; specifically cpu temp, 12V, 5V, and 3.3V values. Most board mfg have purpose designed monitoring software for their boards however we have no idea what motherboard you have installed so we cannot tell you what to use for monitoring temps/voltages.

    My first guess as to the cause of your problem would be a failing pw supply however with no idea what parts are installed and no temp/voltage info, it is only a guess.
     
  9. Shazzalive

    Shazzalive

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    Isn't it a little premature to be measuring temps & voltages? We haven't yet established which piece of hardware is causing the problem.

    If it does turn out to be PSU it'll be replaced. If it turns out to be RAM or mobo then we can get into temps & voltages. - Either that or RMA the RAM/mobo.
     
  10. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    No, it is not. Checking temps and voltages is the very first thing you do when presented with an unknown hardware problem AND it costs nothing to check.
     
  11. Shazzalive

    Shazzalive

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    I disagree; particularly when it's not necessary at the point in time that the case has progressed to - as in this case at this point in time.

    What is the point of the OP posting a full parts listing + temps & voltages measurements if they try connecting in a spare PSU and it solves the problem? (In which case they replace the PSU.) Or if they disconnect the optical drive and it solves the problem? (In which case they replace the optical drive.)
     
  12. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    Perhaps because they are posting in a hardware forum AND it might be advantages to know what hardware.....
    Maybe you do not understand however testing voltages is how you find out if the pw supply is failing. Connecting a test pw supply is the best way however many people do not have a test unit to connect.
     
  13. Shazzalive

    Shazzalive

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    "Maybe you do not understand however testing voltages is how you find out if the pw supply is failing."

    Maybe you fail to understand Ohm's Law and that testing voltages is the worst way to ascertain whether or not your PSU is working properly. - The trick is to load the PSU and measure the delivered Amperage and/or Wattage. - Voltage can be spot on; but if the current's not there then the delivery of power will fail.

    (Edit: Yes I do agree that there will be significant Voltage drop under load if the Amperage is really low.)

    In this particular case I don't see any advantage to knowing exactly which hardware the OP is using. - However that may change in future, so point taken. :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2019
  14. Shazzalive

    Shazzalive

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    Indeed it could. - Good thinking that man.

    Try connecting the reset switch as a power switch and see if doing so resolves the problem.
     
  15. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    Gee IF you had read the thread, you would know that has already been done. First post.....
     
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