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Computer Starts & Instantly Shuts Down.

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Macintuss, Oct 13, 2008.

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  1. Macintuss

    Macintuss Thread Starter

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    Hi. First of all thanks for taking the time to read this.

    I have a Windows XP computer that was running great until this morning. I ran up the stairs and I guess by doing so I gained some static on my feet (through my slippers wtf?) and when I extended my arm to push the power button on my computer some static jumped from my finger to the button and started the computer itself. At first i thought it was pretty cool but realized how wrong I was when the system shut itself down after only 3 seconds of attempting to boot. I powercycled the powersupply (clicked it on and off) and then tried powering the PC again... nothing happened, It didn't even respond. After ten minuets or so I decided to try again and It actually started to boot, but then 3-4 seconds later it just instantly shutdown just as before.

    Any help would be appreciated. I know static = death with computers but im hoping maybe, just maybe it could be a problem with the button itself (not giving enough of a signal to start or something) or something small like it (i dont want to but a whole new MB).

    Thank you for taking the time to read this, and even more gratitude to those who take the time to reply and help!

    -Macintuss
     
  2. stressfreesoul

    stressfreesoul

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    Please supply some more information:
    Brands/Model numbers/ratings etc of all components, if you cant find these, use a program like Everest from Lavalys to give you the information you need.

    From what you have told me already, you have damaged something with the transfer of static. However, this shouldnt have happened as most buttons on a PC are plastic. If its metal, then its a really bad design. Besides that, the major component that fries is memory chips.
    One step at a time though, Makes and models first. Then if you can borrow a power supply that is capable to rule out that possibility first.
     
  3. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    39,186
    Do the following.
    1 Disconnect or pull power from ALL drives; both hd and optical
    2 Disconnect any usb type device
    3 Pull out any add-in cards except the video. Leave the video card installed
    4 Clear cmos with the clear jumper; replace to the keep position

    Now attempt a pw ON and see if the machine will post. If it does not post in the above config, you will need to swap parts with known good units; ie mb, ram, cpu, pw supply, etc. If it does post, then shutdown and connect devices one at a time until you find the problem.
     
  4. Macintuss

    Macintuss Thread Starter

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    I hAtEmIcRoSoFt:
    I'm pretty sure the button IS plastic, that's why it's so strange to me that static could jump from my finger- through the plastic layer- into the wiring (but once again I didn't even push the power button and the computer started). As far as using that program.....well.....if i could start my computer then i wouldn't be on these forums. I have 2 Gigs of ram. An Asus motherboard. I'll just stop there because i don't think the model of my ram or motherboard really affects this outcome/solution.

    crjdriver:
    I disconnected everything except the motherboard (so I had a cord from the surge protector- into the powersupply- and then [the right cords] into my motherboard. I reset my CMOS as you instructed by switching up the pins (as the manual said). As I plugged the cord into the powersupply my computer started to boot, but, after 4 seconds it just faded out (shut off). I don't have a powersupply that I can test/mess around with so i cant test it that way.

    Some other Notes: When everything is plugged in but the computer is "off" the motherboard presents a green light indication that it's receiving a power source.

    Thanks for taking the time to respond guys. I look forward to more suggestions/ideas.
     
  5. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    Just seeing a LED on the board does not mean the pw supply works.

    Next you have two choices;
    1 You can test the system by swapping parts; ie pw supply, board, etc
    2 You can take it to a shop and have them find what is wrong with it for you. Most places are going to charge you a min of 1hr labor [approx $75 or so] for this service.

    FWIW do not take it to best buy, circuit city, etc. Go to a real shop [if this is what you are going to do]
     
  6. Macintuss

    Macintuss Thread Starter

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    Ok. Since I didn't have have a powersupply to test with and didn't want to pay some cheezy reapair company to tell me my MB is fried I decided to just send it in to the manufactuar for a RMA.

    I have a bigger question though: What can i do to prevent this from happening again? Is it the cases fault? Should there be a "ground" cord? Was it somehow my fault? Should i just smash the case and get a new one?

    Incase you were wondering here is the case link on newegg so you can see the culperet. LINK: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811146018

    The reviews on this case seem to be good. And I haven't seen any others complain about shocks.

    Thanks for all the help guys.
     
  7. Classics

    Classics

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    Oh no! Thats my case!
    Not cool.
    On a side note though, I haven't had a single problem with it :s
     
  8. darkmoonchild

    darkmoonchild

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    Oct 14, 2008
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    3
    Well I wouldn't automatically assume it was the static electricity that caused the issue. Although if you do have a computer you should always have it grounded! At least have a surge protector. I had a computer for years and one day I experienced the same problem as you, with the automatic shutdown after a few seconds. Fortunately after un-plugging the computer completely it turned back on and functioned normally. Although I did have to leave it unplugged for several days.

    Just make sure to get a surge protector for that baby and anything else, because spending the money for the protection is better than spending the money to replace the entire computer.
     
  9. Macintuss

    Macintuss Thread Starter

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    had/have a surge protector : ( do cases come with ground cords or some form of static protection?
     
  10. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    Cases do not have ground cords. The power supply is three pronged ie hot, common, and ground.

    BTW what are you going to do when the replacement board arrives and you install it with a possibly failed pw supply???

    If you are going to attempt to repair computers, you need to have test parts available to swap in.
     
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