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Computer won't shut down

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Shmay, Jan 31, 2007.

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  1. Shmay

    Shmay Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2007
    Messages:
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    hey guys:), i was wondering if you could help me with a problem. My computer won't shut down. The only way i can actually turn it off is by the button or *the plug*. I think i'm damaging it, and i recently had it upgraded. here are my specs:

    Windows XP Home service pack 2
    Pentium 4, 3.00 GHz
    1.00 GB of ram
    ASUS P4S800-MX
    250GB hard drive and 80GB C drive
    ATI Radeon 9600 Pro 256 MB (VGA graphics card)

    If you can help me that would be GREAT:D , thanks.
     
  2. pfiltz

    pfiltz

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2005
    Messages:
    294
    I don't have a solution, but I want to watch this thread as well. I have a workstation on the network running 2Kprof, and it doesn't want to shut down like it should. Iexplorer.exe hangs, preventing it to shutdown without the user having to click OK on the dialogue box.

    Running SP4.
     
  3. SMILER_UK

    SMILER_UK Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2007
    Messages:
    1
    Can you elaberate on not shuting down!!! Do you get Error messages? what happens when you select shut down, does it attempt to shut down? Have you installed any new hard ware?
     
  4. B0b_Olivaw

    B0b_Olivaw

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2006
    Messages:
    17
    Hey I actually just posted this earlier:

    Perhaps the User Profile Hive Cleanup Service from Microsoft could be of some help?

    It comes directly from Microsoft

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=1B286E6D-8912-4E18-B570-42470E2F3582&displaylang=en

    Works perfectly for me on my machine (XP Pro SP2)

     
  5. Shmay

    Shmay Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2007
    Messages:
    22
    I'll look into this User Profile Hive Cleanup Service program, and it might work, ill need to restart my computer. as to whats wrong with my PC, when you try to turn the computer off ( using the turn off computer button) everything shuts down, and as the computer is about to shut off (when it makes that *plink* noise) it reboots. at first I thought it was a virus, and it probably might be. or an error on windows xp, like a missing file and etc. i hope it isn't because it would be a REAL bummer if I had to reinstall my OS again. (y)
     
  6. golferbob

    golferbob

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    3,895
  7. pfiltz

    pfiltz

    Joined:
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    I've actually used the HIVE program on 50 workstations running 2K prof. Works great.

    My particular case is the user is ready to go home. He clicks the start button, and chooses to shut down, then walks out the door. The OS hangs because Iexplorer.exe hasn't shut down. I'm not sure if he has it open when he's telling the OS to shutdown or not.

    Going to find out this morning.

    Running 2K prof. SP4
     
  8. Shmay

    Shmay Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2007
    Messages:
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    i am finding this really annoying, I just really dont want to fcuk up my computer, you know? too much money and time spent on it to mess up. so, yeh the computer reboots, you know the standard shut down procedure, the blue XP screen pops up and says saving files or whatnot and then REBOOT. it... is... driving.... me... insane. .....
     
  9. pfiltz

    pfiltz

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2005
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    Just curious Shmay,

    Are there any references in the event viewer under "system", that indicate problems?
     
  10. ODIN 0ERO

    ODIN 0ERO Guest

    have you tried using SYSTEM RESTORE to return your SYSTEM to its previous state?

    turning off your PC via the POWER BUTTON can damage your WINDOWS SYSTEM files.

    and cause a system failure.....i am speaking from my experience long time ago.

    i do not advise it.
     
  11. Shmay

    Shmay Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2007
    Messages:
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    yes, ive tried the system restore. this problems been on for a while. i would have to go back a long way though. i would like to ask, say, i have an installed a large program, for example a game or software like macromedia studio 8, and i use system restore. would it roll back and delete/remove these programs? and i recently installed a new HD (250 gig) can it clear that? just some info I would like to know. Could it also roll back updates on various programs, like Zone alarm and other software installed on my C drive?
     
  12. ODIN 0ERO

    ODIN 0ERO Guest

    yes it can.


    read the following explanation.



    Understanding System Restore

    System Restore performs the following tasks:

    Restores your computer to a previous state

    System Restore automatically tracks changes to your computer at all times and at specific intervals by creating restore points before changes occur. Restore points are stored states of your computer.

    You can also manually create restore points to record your computer state and settings before you make changes to your computer. This allows you to restore the computer to a previous state, by choosing a restore point on a date or time prior to when you made the change.

    For example, if you accidentally delete monitored program files (such as files that have the .exe or .dll file name extensions), or monitored program files become corrupted, you can restore your computer to a state that existed before those changes occurred.

    By default, System Restore monitors and restores all partitions and drives on your computer. It also monitors all installations of applications or drivers that users perform through delivery mechanisms such as CD-ROM, floppy disk, Systems Management Server (SMS), or IntelliMirror.

    In some rare instances, during the restoration process System Restore restores a folder that has the same name as an existing folder. To avoid writing over the existing file, System Restore renames the folder by adding a numeric suffix to the name.

    Restores your computer without losing your personal files

    System Restore does not cause you to lose your personal files or password. Items like documents, e-mail messages, browsing history, and the last specified password are saved when you revert to an earlier state with System Restore.

    System Restore protects your personal files by not restoring any files in the My Documents folder. It also does not restore any files that use common data file name extensions, such as .doc or .xls. If you're not sure whether your personal files use common data file name extensions, and you do not want the data files to be affected by System Restore, save them in the My Documents folder.

    If a program was installed after the restore point that you are restoring to was created, the program might be uninstalled as part of the restoration process. Data files that are created with the program are not lost. However, in order to open the files again, you must reinstall the associated program.

    Stores one to three weeks of past restore points

    The actual number of saved restore points depends on how much activity there has been on your computer, the size of your hard disk (or the partition that contains your Windows XP Professional folder), and how much disk space has been allocated on your computer to store System Restore information. See To change System Restore settings

    Locates dates associated with restore points

    When you run System Restore, a calendar is displayed to help you find dates associated with restore points. If you don't use your computer every day, some days might not have any restore points. If you use your computer frequently, you might have restore points almost every day, and some days might have several restore points.

    Ensures that all restorations are reversible

    If you do not like the state of your computer after your restore it, you can undo the restoration or select another restore point. All successful restorations are reversible. All failed restorations are automatically reversed by System Restore.

    Provides several types of restore points

    The list below describes each type of restore point and how System Restore works with each type.

    Initial System checkpoints

    This restore point is created the first time you start your computer after you upgrade it to Windows XP Professional or when you first start a new computer. Selecting this restore point reverts Windows XP Professional and programs to the state they were in at that time. All files with data file name extensions (such as .doc, .htm, .xls, etc.) and all files in the My Documents folder are not restored.

    If System Restore must remove all old restore points to make room for new changes, a new restore point is created and restore points creation resumes from that time.

    System checkpoints

    System Restore creates restore points on a regular basis even if you have not made any changes to the system. System Restore automatically creates these restore points:
    •

    every 24 hours of calendar time

    or
    •

    every 24 hours your computer is turned on

    If your computer is turned off for more than 24 hours, System Restore creates a restore point the next time you start the computer. The computer must be idle for a few minutes before System Restore creates a scheduled restore point.

    Selecting a scheduled restore point restores Windows XP Professional and programs to the state they were in at that time. Any files with data file name extensions (such as .doc, .htm, .xls, etc.) and all files in the My Documents folder are not restored.

    Program name installation restore points

    When you install a program by using the latest installers such as InstallShield and Windows XP Professional Installer, System Restore creates a restore point. Use these restore points to track changes made to your system or to restore your computer to the state it was in before you installed the program.

    Selecting this restore point removes installed files and registry settings, and restores programs and system files that were altered by the installation. Any files with data file name extensions (such as .doc, .htm, .xls, etc.) and all files in the My Documents folder are not restored.

    To revert the changes made by a program that does not use one of the specified installers, select the most recent restore point before the program was installed.

    Windows XP Professional automatic update restore points

    If you use Windows XP Professional automatic updates to receive downloaded updates, System Restore creates a restore point before installing the updating software. If items are downloaded, but not installed, a restore point is not created. A restore point is created only when the components start to install. Use these points to track changes you made to your system or if these updates might conflict with other products on your computer.

    Manually created restore points

    You can manually create your own restore points in the System Restore Wizard. When a created restore point is listed in the Select a restore point screen, it includes the name you gave it and is prefaced with the day, date and time it was created. You can create a restore point when you like the way your computer is functioning or before you make changes on your computer, like installing programs, that might make your computer function differently.

    Restore operation restore points

    Each time you perform a restoration, it is a change made to your computer. System Restore creates restore operation restore points to track the change and the restoration. You can select these restore operation restore points in the Select a restore point screen in the System Restore Wizard to undo the restoration.

    Unsigned device driver restore points

    System Restore immediately creates a restore point if it detects that you are installing a driver to your computer that has not been signed or certified by Windows Hardware Quality Labs (WHQL). If the installation of the driver makes undesirable changes to your computer, you can select these restore points in the Select a restore point screen in the System Restore Wizard to undo the changes and restore your computer to the state that existed before you installed the driver.

    Microsoft Backup utility recovery restore points

    When you perform a recovery using the Backup utility, System Restore immediately creates a restore point before the process starts. If the recovery puts your computer in an undesirable state, you can select these restore points in the Select a restore point screen in the System Restore Wizard to undo the changes and restore your computer to the state that existed before you performed the recovery.

    Note
    •

    If you restore to a restore point before a program was installed, that program does not work after restoration. If you want to use the program again, you must reinstall it.
    •

    System Restore does not replace the process of uninstalling a program. To completely remove the files installed by a program, you must remove the program using Add or Remove Programs in Control Panel or the program's own uninstall program. To open Add or Remove Programs, click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Add or Remove Programs.
    •

    System Restore does not monitor or restore contents of redirected folders or any settings associated with roaming user profiles.
    •

    System Restore monitors and restores only the partitions and drives that it is configured to monitor, not partitions or drives that are redirected or excluded from System Restore monitoring.
    •

    If you have encrypted program files (such as files that have the .exe or .dll file name extensions), you can ensure that they can never be restored to a decrypted state. To do this, turn off System Restore before you encrypt your files or folders, and then turn System Restore on again after the files or folders are encrypted. Or, if you have already encrypted the files or folders, turn System Restore off and on again. When you turn off System Restore, you delete all restore points. The restore points that are created after System Restore is turned on again will not include times when the files were decrypted. Typically, you only encrypt data files, which are not affected by System Restore.
     
  13. Shmay

    Shmay Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2007
    Messages:
    22
    so it can clear or reverse files i put on my second HD?
     
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