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Configuring Linksys Router with Netgear Router

Discussion in 'Networking' started by klmklm, Mar 31, 2008.

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  1. klmklm

    klmklm Thread Starter

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    Hello Friends,

    Below is my scenario:

    1st Router: Netgear (Currently working/Internet ON)
    2nd Router, 3rd Router, etc... : All Linksys Routers (Trying to set-up).

    I have cable internet and currently Netgear is connected with the cable modem and is supplying internet perfectly. However, I purchased additional Linksys routers and would like to configure them to work with Netgear Router, I have a static IP from the ISP.

    Netgear Login IP: 192.168.2.1
    Linksys Login IP: 192.168.1.1

    BTW: All Routers are wireless as well. Awaiting your reply.

    -Thanks
     
  2. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    What do you mean by "working with the Netgear router"? Are you talking about having the routers connecting to each as multiple cascaded routers or are you talking about using the Linksys routers as purely access points?
     
  3. klmklm

    klmklm Thread Starter

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    Multiple routers cascading with each other. -Thanks
     
  4. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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  5. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    An alternative connection scheme to configure the router's as access points to eliminate the NAT barrier and it's problems in the network.

    Connecting two (or more) SOHO broadband routers together.

    Note: The "primary" router can be an actual router, a software gateway like Microsoft Internet Connection Sharing, or a server connection that has the capability to supply more than one IP address using DHCP server capability. No changes are made to the primary "router" configuration.

    Configure the IP address of the secondary router(s) to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address, 192.168.0.253 for another router, etc.

    Note: Do this first, as you will have to reboot the computer to connect to the router again for the remaining changes.

    Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

    Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router, channels, encryption, etc.

    Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. Leave the WAN port unconnected!

    This procedure bypasses the routing function (NAT layer) and configures the router as a switch (or wireless access point for wireless routers).
     
  6. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    If the additional router isn't used for it's firewall/NAT separation capabilities or as an access point, then a switch is a better solution. I'm pretty sure the OP wants to create security trust zones just like I did when I had multiple routers cascaded off of one main one.
     
  7. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    Actually, if you want to use the wireless capability, the switch is not a better solution. He did mention they're all wireless routers, right? I also saw nothing about creating security zones, so we'll have to wait for clarification from the original poster to see what the intent of this configuration actually is...
     
  8. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    I didn't say a switch was a better solution. I said if the linking of routers isn't for either cascading routers for security trust zones or for the AP functionality, a switch would be a better solution.

    Yes, we need a bit more clarification. But I asked if he was looking to cascade routers and this was his reply:

     
  9. klmklm

    klmklm Thread Starter

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    Actually, I am lost with all this explanation, Can someone please give me a step by step instruction as to how to approach.

    All I know about this specific routers is the following:

    Netgear IP: 192.168.2.1
    Linksys IP: 192.168.1.1
    ISP Static IP: 24.241.106.70
    ISP Sunbet: 255.255.255.252
    ISP Gateway: 24.241.106.69
    DNS Servers: 24.217.0.5
    DNS Servers: 24.217.0.55

    Netgear is currently connected to Cable modem, I would like to Add Linksys to Netgear and then from there on, further add other Linksys to Linksys. -Thanks
     
  10. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    What are you trying to accomplish with this setup? Is it for security reason?
     
  11. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Yeah, I'm eager to hear the answers to zx10guy's last two questions!

    There should be no problem cascading the Linksys to the Netgear. To continue cascading Linksys (or any other brand) routers you will need to use different LAN addresses on the additional ones--for example, 192.168.3.1, 192.168.4.1, etc. No guarantee that something won't get bogged down at some level.
     
  12. klmklm

    klmklm Thread Starter

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    I am just trying to extend the range of wireless network. -Thanks
     
  13. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    OK, then you clearly don't want to cascade them, since that will result in segmenting the network into multiple subnets.

    If you can run a wire between the routers, the solution I posted previously will solve your problem. If you want to have a wireless link between network segments, then you need a wireless bridge. FWIW, you can use DD-WRT 3rd party firmware on many Linksys routers to add the capability of wireless bridging if your particular model doesn't have it with the stock firmware.
     
  14. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    As John has stated, you don't want to cascade routers. You can do as he suggested by extending an ethernet cable to the Linksys routers and create a chain. If you want to do the extension wirelessly thereby bridging connections, you have to use WDS (wireless distribution system) and both end points have to support this.

    You have to plan out the network topology based on coverage. So the size of the area you want to have wireless coverage is important to know. The preferred method is to use a wireless controller switch with associated light wireless access points to get your even coverage while allowing users to roam the entire wireless network without having to reconnect to another SSID and to allow central management. Cisco's wireless system is built around this model. For a less expensive setup, you can get a similar product from Netgear. Here's the wireless controller switch: http://www.netgear.com/Products/APsWirelessControllers/WirelessControllers/WFS709TP.aspx
    And here's a light access point which will work with the wireless controller switch: http://www.netgear.com/Products/APsWirelessControllers/WirelessControllers/WGL102.aspx

    If you are just looking to extend wireless far enough for one additional access point to provide coverage, then I would get an access point which supports WDS and set both of them in repeater mode. This will allow you to do the above setup with the wireless controller and light access point where you have a single SSID operating on the same channel and encryption. Again, this will allow for wireless roaming without any break in the communication. I'm thinking about this solution with my home where I'm running a Netgear WG102. The only catch I have is to make sure if I get a second WG102 that multiple BSSIDs are still supported for repeating.
     
  15. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    Note that WDS will reduce the bandwidth available on the wireless connection. Since wireless is marginal as it is for file/print sharing, reducing the bandwidth further is probably not a really good idea. :)
     
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