1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

Connect Two Routers Together

Discussion in 'Networking' started by tiberiusjojo, Mar 31, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. tiberiusjojo

    tiberiusjojo Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Hey! So, i want to connect a DIR-625 Wireless N ( dlink.com/products/?model=DIR-625) to a DI-524 Wireless G d-link.ca/products/?model=DI-524). I want the DIR-625 Wireless N to be the one exposed to the internet with the DI-524 Wireless G connected to the DIR-625. The reason i want to do this is because I want to have both wireless N + G running at the same time. Is that possible?

    Here is the steps i have so far on how to do it. I got them from a previous post in the forum about a linksys and have adapted them to the D-Link and i want to know if they will work with the D-Link's.

    1) Plug the DI-524 into a computer. Make Sure the internet is NOT connected to the DI-524.

    2) Log into the router and change the Router's IP to 192.168.0.2 and disable DHCP

    3) Unplug the DI-524, plug the internet into the DIR-625, and connect the DIR-625 to the same computer.

    4) Set up my PPPoE settings and set up my wireless security settings.

    5) Connect the DI-524 to the DIR-625 by connecting them with standard Ethernet cable. Make sure to connect them by LAN ports.

    6) Plug the rest of the computers into the DIR-625 and set them up normally.


    Will these adapted steps work? Can i run Wireless G + N at the same time?

    Thanks in advance Everyone!


    Also, for reference here is the thread i got these steps from (devhardware.com/forums/networking-34/connect-another-router-to-existing-router-71149.html)

    Also Sorry I can't post links so you have to add www. to the front of them
     
  2. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2008
    Messages:
    5,817
    Yes, you can cascade routers. I've done it in the past. Actually I had two different routers hanging off one main one at the same time. The things you need to keep in mind are this. You need to define your subnets for each inside network corresponding to each router. If you are using 192.168.0.0/24, this would mean by standard convention, the 625 would have an address of 192.168.0.1 and the 524 would have an IP address of 192.168.0.2. The 524 would then have the inside private address of 192.168.1.0/24 with its address being 192.168.1.1. The default gateway on the 524 would need to be configured to have 192.168.0.1 and you can also set the 524 to have the DNS configured to point to 192.168.0.1.

    On the 625 you would configure the PPPoE setup like normal to connect up to your ISP. Clients residing on the 192.168.1.0 subnet would be able to get DNS name resolution without any issues as the 524 router would do look ups on via the 625 and then proxy the results to the clients.

    Wireless would not be an issue as long as you set the channels to different non-adjacent channels. 1,6, and 11 are non overlapping. Lastly, set the SSID differently for both wireless networks and use different preshared keys.

    One word of note. This setup is uni-directional. You can initiate connections from the inside of the 524 going outward to the 625 and the internet. But the reverse is not true. You cannot initiate any connections from the 192.168.0.0 network to the 192.168.1.0 network unless you create holes in the 524 router via port forward rules.
     
  3. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Messages:
    76,317
    First Name:
    Terry
    You will need to use a cross-over cable if neither router has auto-sensing ports (but probably at least one does).

    IP 192.168.0.2 for the 2nd router (that you are configuring as a switch and wireless access point) assumes that that address is outside the range of the 1st router's Dhcp server's address range. So (I didn't check any documents), if the Dhcp server address range is .2 through .100 say, then just use something like 192.168.0.254 for the 2nd router.

    You can connect computers to either wireless signal or the LAN ports of either router and they will all be on the same network.

    Note that zx10guy gave a long dissertation on cascading routers, which is fine but not what you asked about.
     
  4. tiberiusjojo

    tiberiusjojo Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Thanks m8. If i have any questions or problems I will be sure to come back and ask
     
  5. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2008
    Messages:
    5,817
    Good point about about the DHCP range if the OP wants to use DHCP.

    Re-reading the post, it appears maybe the OP is looking to use the 524 as an access point only which wasn't too clear. I keyed off of the wanting to expose the one 625 to the internet.
     
  6. tiberiusjojo

    tiberiusjojo Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Ok.... Just figured out that I'm a n00b.... The reason i was doing this was because i have a laptop that has a 802.11g card. I Didn't think that a G device could connect to a Wireless N network but i just discovered that it can. This is all pointless now. Thanks all for the help

    (A 802.11g card can connect to an N network right?)
     
  7. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Messages:
    76,317
    First Name:
    Terry
    Yes, 'n' networks are backwards compatible with 'g' and 'b'. But there is a good reason for having two wireless signals as you described. If you have computers with adapters capable of using 'n' it is good to keep non 'n' devices off the 'n' network.
     
  8. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2002
    Messages:
    106,418
    Connecting two (or more) SOHO broadband routers together.

    Note: The "primary" router can be an actual router, a software gateway like Microsoft Internet Connection Sharing, or a server connection that has the capability to supply more than one IP address using DHCP server capability. No changes are made to the primary "router" configuration.

    Configure the IP address of the secondary router(s) to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address, 192.168.0.253 for another router, etc.

    Note: Do this first, as you will have to reboot the computer to connect to the router again for the remaining changes.

    Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

    Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router, channels, encryption, etc.

    Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. Leave the WAN port unconnected!

    This procedure bypasses the routing function (NAT layer) and configures the router as a switch (or wireless access point for wireless routers).
     
  9. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Messages:
    76,317
    First Name:
    Terry
    Good note, John, but I think that "software gateway" will bewilder more than help many readers. ;)

    Consider something like: The "primary" router can be an actual router (including a modem/router combo), a computer with Internet Connection Sharing enabled, or ...

    I realize my suggestion ignores other software ICS-like solutions, but few of the posters here seem to use them.
     
  10. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2002
    Messages:
    106,418
    I added that from another comment and the several folks that were connecting to university networks and trying to get a router working. We'll see how it's received and modify it if necessary. :)
     
  11. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/699055

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice