Connecting a GTX1070 Graphics Card to a VGA Monitor

Status
This thread has been Locked and is not open to further replies. Please start a New Thread if you're having a similar issue. View our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

camsie

Thread Starter
Joined
Dec 4, 2016
Messages
15
I need to connect a Gigabyte G1 GTX1070 (8GB) graphics card to a Samsung SyncMaster 940N monitor. It's just a single-monitor setup.

The only output sockets on the graphics card are DVI-D, Displayport 1.4 (as far as I know, they aren't DP++ ports) and HDMI. The only input socket on the monitor is a VGA (HD-15) socket.

Obviously, I will need some sort of adapter to be able to connect the monitor to one of the graphics card's outputs. My research suggests that while it is possible to go DVI-D to VGA, this is an expensive option that I won't be able to accomplish for less then $50. Confusingly, there do seem to be numerous cheap DVI-D to VGA adapters on the market that actually fit in the respective sockets, but won't actually convey a picture from a DVI-D output to a VGA input.

My research into going Displayport-to-VGA has become confusing as there are apparently two different kinds of adapters for these connections - "active" and "passive". I've gotten conflicting stories about which type I actually need and in any event, most of the Displayport-to-VGA adapters I have seen for sale don't state exactly which type they are and in many cases the merchants selling them don't even seem to know which type they are!

There are HDMI-to-VGA cables on the market at very cheap prices, but after the complexities I've struck thus far regarding the other 2 plug types, I'm reluctant to just assume that one of these will actually do the job without some confirmation from somebody more knowledgeable about these things.

So my question is, which of these three output types (DVI-D, Displayport or HDMI) is my best (i.e. cheapest reliable) avenue for connection to my VGA monitor, and, if you suggest a Displayport, can you please tell me whether I'll need a "passive" or "active" adapter for this and how I might be able to tell them apart when their type isn't clearly advertized?
 

flavallee

Frank
Trusted Advisor
Joined
May 12, 2002
Messages
83,857
The Samsung Syncmaster 940N is a pretty old monitor and does have only a 15-pin VGA connector.

If the cable you have that connects the monitor to the computer is a 15-pin VGA one
cable.JPG

all you should need is a DVI-to-VGA adapter
adapter.JPG

to connect to that GeForce GTX 1070 graphics card before connecting the VGA cable to it.

DVI-D comes in different pin configurations, so make sure the adapter is the correct one to match the graphics card.

Unless you bought that graphics card used, I'm surprised it didn't come with one or more adapters in its box.

-------------------------------------------------------------
 
Last edited:

camsie

Thread Starter
Joined
Dec 4, 2016
Messages
15
If the cable that connects the monitor to the computer is a standard 15-pin VGA one
View attachment 253672

all you should need is a DVI-to-VGA adapter
View attachment 253673

for that GeForce GTX 1070 graphics card.

DVI-D comes in single link and dual link, so make sure the adapter has the correct pins to match the graphics card.

-------------------------------------------------------------
I've had numerous sources tell me that the only kind of DVI-D to VGA adapters that will actually work are $50+ ones. But there are indeed numerous cheap DVI-D to VGA adapters on the market. Apparently they are utterly useless because they don't translate the signal properly, even though the plugs are the right ones.
 

flavallee

Frank
Trusted Advisor
Joined
May 12, 2002
Messages
83,857
Re-read my last reply because I've been editing it.

DVI-to-VGA adapters are very cheap.
I've had to buy a few of them over the years because some of the graphics cards that I bought or inherited didn't have a VGA port.
I've had no signal issue with them.

I don't know which country you live in, but I buy most of my computer parts from the www.newegg.com site.
HERE are some that you can browse through.

--------------------------------------------------------------
 

crjdriver

Moderator
Joined
Jan 2, 2001
Messages
44,171
I've had numerous sources tell me that the only kind of DVI-D to VGA adapters that will actually work are $50+ ones
Wrong. When I had old vga type monitors, I used a simple adapter like the one pictured above. No problems at all. If you just go to a computer shop, they probably have a lot of those just sitting around [I must have 10 of them in the parts closet] If they charge you at all, it will only be a few $.
 

camsie

Thread Starter
Joined
Dec 4, 2016
Messages
15
Wrong. When I had old vga type monitors, I used a simple adapter like the one pictured above. No problems at all. If you just go to a computer shop, they probably have a lot of those just sitting around [I must have 10 of them in the parts closet] If they charge you at all, it will only be a few $.
Yeah, my currant card (Radeon HD 6870) has no VGA, only DVI sockets and some other ones, and I have it hooked up to my monitor just fine with a DVI-to-VGA adapter. Hence, when I brought a new GTX1070, and I saw it too had a DVI output, I just assumed that I would be connecting my monitor in exactly the same way.

Only after I took the graphics card out of the box did I realize that it's DVI socket was slightly different to the one on my currant graphics card. Turns out DVI encompasses multiple sub-types. My currant card has a DVI-I, but the new card I've brought (the GTX1070), has a DVI-D.

I wasn't too worried, as I just assumed it would mean a trip up to my local computer store to buy a $2-10 adapter as you say.

But once I started doing a little research into it, matters started to seem a lot more complicated. Apparently, the pins that are present in a DVI-I, but missing in a DVI-D are crucial to the VGA system. So a cheap adapter that merely cross-connects pins from one plug type to another simply won't do now. In the case of a DVI-D plug, you apparently need more complex circuitry to simulate the output of the missing pins that used to be on the DVI-I socket.

That circuitry adds up to $$$
 

flavallee

Frank
Trusted Advisor
Joined
May 12, 2002
Messages
83,857
Only after I took the graphics card out of the box did I realize that it's DVI socket was slightly different to the one on my currant graphics card. Turns out DVI encompasses multiple sub-types. My currant card has a DVI-I, but the new card I've brought (the GTX1070), has a DVI-D.
Which one of these DVI ports looks like the one on your new graphics card?

Capture.JPG

--------------------------------------------------------------
 

flavallee

Frank
Trusted Advisor
Joined
May 12, 2002
Messages
83,857
HERE are some examples of a DVI-D to VGA adapter, with or without a cable.

---------------------------------------------------------------
 

camsie

Thread Starter
Joined
Dec 4, 2016
Messages
15
HERE are some examples of a DVI-D to VGA adapter, with or without a cable.

---------------------------------------------------------------
What jumps out at me is that most of those DVI-D to VGA adapters that are in the lower price range have shockingly bad ratings and numerous customer claims that they are useless.

The cheapest one that seems like it might work is $22.73 - after converting in to my own Australian dollars, that amounts to about $30. I must admit that's cheaper then any of the similar products I've found thus far.

Whether further research would allow me to get by so cheaply from a local seller, well, I guess I'll have to check that out.

But do you see what I mean about how a simple $10< adapter doesn't seem to be up to the job? How it seems like I'll need something more complicated and expensive if I choose to connect to the DVI-D socket?
 

camsie

Thread Starter
Joined
Dec 4, 2016
Messages
15
One of these should be all you need :-

http://www.ebay.com.au/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_sacat=0&_sop=15&_nkw=dvi-d+dual+link+to+vga+adapter

If it was me I'd buy the cheapest one and try it.
Thanks, but if you go back to my previous reply to flavallee, you'll see that similar adapters on the website he recommended are bombarded with negative reviews from customers who say they don't work. I have done some research into this before posting in this forum and everywhere I look states that a simple, cheap DVI-D to VGA adapter is utterly useless because there needs to be complex circuitry translating the signal from DVI-style to VGA-style. This circuitry just isn't included in a simple adapter and doesn't come cheap unless you strike a ludicrous bargain.

I have read statements from numerous people on numerous websites saying that they were burned when they bought adapters like the ones you suggest.

Yes, a simple adapter works fine for DVI-I to VGA. I know because I'm currantly using one.

But I've been repeatedly told that DVI-D is a radically different type of socket, more so then the rather minor difference in pin configuration would suggest.

Going DVI-I to VGA is simple. Going DVI-D to VGA is much more complicated.
 

flavallee

Frank
Trusted Advisor
Joined
May 12, 2002
Messages
83,857
I was wondering too why such an old small monitor was being used instead of using a newer larger monitor which has multiple connection ports.

---------------------------------------------------------------
 

camsie

Thread Starter
Joined
Dec 4, 2016
Messages
15
Why keep messing with adapters that you are not sure will work???
Well, the whole reason I came on here was to consult with experts who I assumed would be able to tell me for certain which method (I suspected either Displayport or HDMI) would allow me to make the connection as cheaply as possible.

I'd hoped that after reading the responses here, I would be certain what kind of adapter(s) would work and from there it would be just a simple matter of searching for the best price on one of those adapters.

A new modern monitor [larger than your current one] is only a little more than the expensive adapter.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824236759&ignorebbr=1
$89.99 after the mir.
You spent more than $400 on a video card then want to go cheap on a monitor? It does not make sense to me.
I saved-up for and brought a top-quality graphics card because it will last the longest. Hopefully it will be at least 6 or 7 years before I start being told that it is too obsolete to run the latest software. Believe me, if there were options on today's games to turn the graphics quality down so low that they'd run on my existing 1GB card, I'd never have bothered upgrading at all.

But it doesn't work that way, unfortunately. I've been seeing for about the last 18 months or so that interesting-looking games can't run on my PC, so I bit the bullet and brought an upgrade, aiming for the best possible lifespan.

But I never budgeted for a new monitor because I assumed I wouldn't need one.
 
Status
This thread has been Locked and is not open to further replies. Please start a New Thread if you're having a similar issue. View our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 807,865 other people just like you!

Members online

Top