Convert FAT32 To NTFS

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redsox13

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To change from FAT 32 to NTFS file system for more stability, security and less fragmentation, open the command prompt and type:

Convert C: /FS:NTFS

"C" being the drive you wish to convert. Make sure there is a space between the C: and the foward slash (/). Once you press enter it will ask you for confirmation and press Y. Then press Y and enter once more to reboot.. This also works for windows XP Home.
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Is it safe to perform that little trick?
 

redsox13

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meaning I could lose everything?

I just want to be able to work with files larger than 4 gigs
 

RAM-PAGE

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OK. NTFS uses 4096 Byte clusters on all drives. FAT32 uses 4069 Byte clusters up to 8192Mb (8·0Gb)

I find that if you have a FAT32 drive with 4096 Byte clusters you can probably convert it safely.

Over 8192Mb FAT32 changes to 16384 Byte clusters, and things become less predictable.

When I tried to convert such a FAT32 drive I got 512 Byte clusters, which are too small, they tell me. So I just backed up the data to clear the drive and FULL formatted to NTFS to get 4096 Byte clusters.

All drives are now 4096 Byte NTFS drives.
 

RAM-PAGE

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redsox13 said:
meaning I could lose everything?

I just want to be able to work with files larger than 4 gigs
There is ALWAYS that possibility when working on drives. So it is always better to back up your data first.
 

Squashman

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Are you doing this on XP or Windows 2000. Windows 2000 has issues with the cluster size when you convert to NTFS. It will end up making 512 byte cluseters instead of the normal 4Kb clusters. Running convert on XP works as it should.
 

RAM-PAGE

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LwdSquashman said:
Are you doing this on XP or Windows 2000. Windows 2000 has issues with the cluster size when you convert to NTFS. It will end up making 512 byte clusters instead of the normal 4Kb clusters. Running convert on XP works as it should.
Not always. I have had it go wrong with XP. That was the example I was referring to.
 
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redsox13 said:
To change from FAT 32 to NTFS file system for more stability, security and less fragmentation, open the command prompt and type:

Convert C: /FS:NTFS

"C" being the drive you wish to convert. Make sure there is a space between the C: and the foward slash (/). Once you press enter it will ask you for confirmation and press Y. Then press Y and enter once more to reboot.. This also works for windows XP Home.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Is it safe to perform that little trick?
You cannot convert back to fat32 unless you reformat the c: drive
 

RAM-PAGE

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pc_doctor said:
You cannot convert back to fat32 unless you reformat the c: drive
I am told that you can, by using Partition Magic, but I have never tried it and don't know if you have to take the data off the drive.
 
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RAM-PAGE said:
I am told that you can, by using Partition Magic, but I have never tried it and don't know if you have to take the data off the drive.
Yes with Partition magic, but not many people have got it. What do you mean by taking the data off the drive?
 

RAM-PAGE

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pc_doctor said:
Yes with Partition magic, but not many people have got it. What do you mean by taking the data off the drive?
I was wondering if you can convert back, only on an empty drive.
i.e. Backup all the data and delete it from the drive before converting.
 
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RAM-PAGE said:
I was wondering if you can convert back, only on an empty drive.
i.e. Backup all the data and delete it from the drive before converting.
im not quite sure, as i use partition magic if i do a absolute reformat where i have to make it an active partition. I wouldnt like to try it unless i had it all backed up. I suppose you could do it, as you can make two paritions out of one hard drive and resize them whenever so i would say yes you prop could convert back
 

RAM-PAGE

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I am very cautious now after losing a drive through resizing partitions.

Thanks for the info. :)
 

Squashman

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RAM-PAGE said:
Not always. I have had it go wrong with XP. That was the example I was referring to.
I have never seen it happen on XP. Microsoft only notes it as a problem on Windows 2000.
 
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RAM-PAGE said:
I am very cautious now after losing a drive through resizing partitions.

Thanks for the info. :)
Losing a drive??

What program did you use?
How much free space did u have on the drive when you did it?
How many paritions were on there, and what operating system have you got?
Did you check for errors on the disc before doing it as this can have a impact?

Thanks
 
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