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Cpu Temp And System Temp Not Sure??!?!!

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by el3m3ntal1, Oct 5, 2003.

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  1. el3m3ntal1

    el3m3ntal1 Thread Starter

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    hi uhh, i have athlon xp 2000+ and my cpu temp is 45-47 degrees celsius... and my system temperature is 50 degrees celsius... do i have to worry about any heat problems?

    plz help!!! THANKS
     
  2. sleekluxury

    sleekluxury

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    well according to my search results on google, thats about almost the max a cpu should be, i guess its good, but if you want to you could put another fan on.
     
  3. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    I'm somewhat surprised that the system temperature is 50C, IMO that's certainly cause for concern! Are you sure those aren't reversed, it's very rare for the MB to be running hotter than an AMD processor.
     
  4. hewee

    hewee

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    Yea the motherboard temperature should be very close to your room temperature.
     
  5. sleekluxury

    sleekluxury

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    Keep the CPU cool.
     
  6. zephyr

    zephyr

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    I'd suggest a look under the hood to verify that all case fans are running. Also clean all dust from fan blades and air vents.

    Normally the system board temperature will run about 10° above room temperature. With the advent of ducted cooling for processors, the processor can actually run cooler than the system. My processor usually runs about 5° C. cooler than my mobo. They run 27° C. and 32° C. respectively. It's a P4 with ducted cooling which came standard on this HP pavilion 540n.

    The fact that your interior case temp is about the same as your processor would seem to indicate that the heat isn't being exhausted from the case. Check those fans. If you get that case temperature down, the processor will follow almost in a direct proportion. (Assumes non-ducted system)
     
  7. John Sparkman

    John Sparkman

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    I think I'll look into a new CPU heat sink and fan.
    I'm running an AMD XP 1800+ with a cpu heatsink and fan that came bundled with the CPU. I also have two case fans that are setup as exhaust fans and the side panel on the case has large vent slots to alow outside air flow into the case.

    BTW: A friend of mine, that runs his own custom build computer shop, told me that the AMD XP 1800+ has a "Die Temp" of 180 °F.

    Temperatures
    Motherboard 34 °C (93 °F)
    CPU 49 °C (120 °F)
     
  8. zephyr

    zephyr

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    What bothers me about that decision is, if your reported temps are correct, the interior of your case is hotter than than the processor so any change should address the case ventilation rather than the processor fan. The processor fan can only supply air at the temperature of the air it draws from, which is the inside case air temperature. You really need to cool the case air down in order to gain any meaningful heat transfer from the processor to the surrounding air.

    Have you tried running with the cover removed and possibly letting a small desk fan blow on the interior of the case? If that brings the temperatures down substantially, then it would prove the point I'm trying to make. Even without a desk fan it may bring temps down.

    I assume your power supply fan is working properly. If it isn't working, the possibility is the other case fan/fans will suck air backward through it and cause elevated temps inside the case. The power supply should always blow outwards. I like other fans to blow inwards for best circulation and avoidence of short circuiting the air flow path. There are times when that doesn't apply but it a good general rule.

    Analyze the possible air flow through the case. It may be pulling air through the vents and exhausting it immediately without drawing it across the mobo due to some sort of poor engineering or cables in the way.

    Just a few ideas for you to consider.
     
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