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creating a CD

Discussion in 'All Other Software' started by froghopper, Feb 16, 2004.

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  1. froghopper

    froghopper Thread Starter

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    I hope that I've posed in the correct forum.

    I have at long last, accepted the fact that CD's are here to stay!
    I've even gone so far as to purchase the necessary hardware to create my own!! (Aopen 52x24x52 CD R-W).

    Before I launch into the "unknown", I would very much appreciate any advice/help, experience or pitfalls associated with the operation.

    The intention is create a "loadable" CD - (to transfer a a program from the CD onto a hard disc).

    As you will already have gathered, I'm as raw as it gets. Any advice will be much appreciated.
     
  2. LONGHAIR

    LONGHAIR

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    What burning software are you using?
     
  3. slipe

    slipe

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    By loadable if you mean you want to move programs that are installed on your computer to a CD so it can be installed on another computer it is generally not possible. Cleansweep has a transport function for moving programs to other computers and there are other programs, but unless the program initially monitored the install on your computer it isn’t 100%.

    If you have programs you downloaded just copy the download to the CD. It will install or unzip directly from the CD or you can copy it to the HD and install it.

    If you have a program CD you want a copy of use the “Copy” mode of the burner software. If it doesn’t work it is copy protected. There are ways around copy protections but we aren’t allowed to help you with that on this board.

    One hint for happy and successful burning is to never buy a RW re-recordable CD unless you have some very specialized task like full daily backups you want to perform. Never write anything to RW that is your only copy. Packet writing to RW is the big problem for losing data, but RW isn’t as good for archive even if you use the regular mastering software.
     
  4. joe2cool

    joe2cool

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    Hi Slipe don't actually use RW Recordables but didn't know that......

    'One hint for happy and successful burning is to never buy a RW re-recordable CD unless you have some very specialized task like full daily backups you want to perform. Never write anything to RW that is your only copy. Packet writing to RW is the big problem for losing data, but RW isn’t as good for archive even if you use the regular mastering software.'
     
  5. froghopper

    froghopper Thread Starter

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    Hi Everyone, The burning software is Nero.
    Slipe has got it right. I really want to create a cd which will enable a program from my computer to be recorded and then run on another machine. These programs have been created by me - so I'm not infringing any copyright.

    I'd previously discussed this with a friend and he more or less said what you've said. Generally not possible. He went into a lot of detail about "layering" - which lost me in the first sentence! But I thought he was talking about copying other parties CD's.

    "Never use RW Recordables". That's interesting, I 'll stick to that until I've gained some more knowlege of the subject. Obviously Slipe is speaking from experience.

    Thank you. Some one will always respond, which is why this site is so successful.
     
  6. bookime wood

    bookime wood

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    I wouldn't waste a full blank cd on 1 program, depends on how big the file is I suppose. I use cd/rw have had np with them thus far, what I would suggest, is make yourself a start up cd, i.e with all your programs that you need for say after a format, it is very handy to have them all on 1 cd. As for your burning a program question, burn them as a DATA disc, nero will show what to do when you choose data disc and burn them at a reasonable speed cd/rw usually only burn at 4x, I always burn my data at 4x even on cd/r.


    bookime
     
  7. froghopper

    froghopper Thread Starter

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    Hi Bookieme wood,
    Again, thank you for your advice.
    I agree that using a blank CD capable of 700/800 Mb's to burn a program of say, 250 Mb's or less, is wasteful - 'not sure what the answer is to that one. I suppose it's one of the drawbacks of todays high tech CD's!!

    I was interested to learn that you recommend burning speeds of X4. The system I've purchased boasts a burning speed of X52 for CD-R and X24 for Cd-RW!! Now, even I can understand that if something goes wrong at those speeds, it's going to be a disaster! (I'm not sure what the range of burning speeds is actually available - I'm quickly looking thro' the blurb but can't find it at the mo). Even so, I can't see such a product being marketed if it didn't do what it said it could!!

    I really bought the gear to create loadable CD's - which so far, is a problem. I'm sure (fingers crossed) that somewhere "out there" I'll eventually find the answer. After all, "they" can do it so why can't I?
     
  8. bookime wood

    bookime wood

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    Howdy froghopper

    Burning speed!! Yes the cd/rw drives can burn very fast 52x but your blank media(cd/r) must be able to as well, check your discs for speed. But burning very fast is not for me, there is a increase in buffer under run/spit outs/bad burn etc etc. You will figure out what speed is best for you, just go by your coaster count (spat out discs).lol

    Loadable CD'S!! I take it you mean cd-roms, i.e you pop them in your cd-rom and they auto run/install?? If so there is an option for cd-rom in nero. Although I have never used it, I am sure we can work it out.


    regards

    bookime
     
  9. froghopper

    froghopper Thread Starter

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    Hi bookime wood ('got it right this time).
    You've created quite a stir this end and got us all laughing! Having read the bit about burning speed of the blank media disc's - and not knowing the answer - I asked my lady where I put the "coasters".

    "Coasters", she replied, " what Coasters?"
    "They're in the that red box" I said, "the one I brought back from the village".
    "Is that what they are? - I thought it was something to do with your computer"!

    These say up to 12X. (they were rather cheap, so I guess you gets what you pays for)

    Buffer? 2Mb's - don't know if that's good or bad. And yes, CD-Rom. That's what I mean. I referred to it as a "loadable CD" in the first post and had to run with it!

    OK, I reckon I'm ready to give it a go. If it falls flat on it's face, I can always come back and cry for help!

    (I'll let you know the results some time tomorrow. regards and thanks.)
     
  10. slipe

    slipe

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    You don’t get buffer underrun “spit-outs” with any burner since 16X if you enable burn-proof or whatever buffer underrun protection it has. Some 12X burners also had burn-proof.

    You can burn multi-session to CDR. You close the session so it can be read on any computer and the disk is left open so you can add more sessions. Most newer software defaults to multi-session for data.

    Most newer burners will burn at the full rated speed of the CDs with good success and reasonable error rate. Some old cranky burners required low burn speeds, but iI would burn at the rated speed of the CDRs for most things if you have a decent burner.

    Staples has a 30 pack of Sony CDs this week for $8 and Best buy has a 50 pack of Verbatim for $13. The reliable brands are Sony, Fuji, Taiyo Yuden and Verbatim. Mitsui Gold are also very reliable but are pricey and hard to find in local stores. Any other brand you don’t really know who made the things and error rates can vary.

    If you wrote the programs you probably are familiar with the integration. With some programs you can copy the program folder over and it works fine in another computer. Try it. My daughter did a search for all of the components of Auto-Cad and copied the stuff to a CD and from that to here home computer. She used it that way for years. Most programs don’t work if you do that but you never know.
     
  11. bookime wood

    bookime wood

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    Lol @coasters tell her not to buy any real coasters, because you will more than likely furnish her with some new "TRENDY" ones that you can't buy in the shop.


    CD's are not like blank dvd media, where you have to choose very carefully, most of the brands and generic stuff work fine. The 12x speed cd's will be fine, I have used all sorts of cd's from philips, memorex, trax-data, tdk, generic cheepo cheaps, all were fine for audio and data. But my mp3's are all backed up on TDK blue backs, went the extra few pounds for a bit more quality.


    On the subject of spit outs, in my msi dvd burner which is capable of 48x cd/r I still have had errors and spit outs if I burn to fast, with buffer under run enabled.


    regards


    bookime
     
  12. LONGHAIR

    LONGHAIR

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    My TDK has never created a coaster. I always use good quality blanks though (Sony or TDK) It's a few years old now, it was one of the first 24x TDK burners put out. I always use the 24x burn speed. Actually the only time I ever slowed it down was for an experiment to another poster here.

    My old 8x HP was a totally different story. It never burned above 4x and created tons of coasters at that speed too.
     
  13. slipe

    slipe

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    It hasn’t crossed your mind that your generic cheapie stuff might have a relationship to your coasters and speed limitations? I use cheapies and they are seldom spit out of my 52X Liteon. But I don’t archive anything important on them. And they are never spit out for buffer underruns with burn-proof engaged. There is usually some sort of write error involved and it is a pretty rare occurrence. I always burn at the full rated speed of the CDs.

    You will find that even though the CDs work OK the error rate varies a lot with media. With good error correction they will read OK but might have problems in some entertainment players. They will not age as well as the error rate can already be on the edge and not tolerate much more degradation. So I only archive to better quality CDs and check the error rate.

    LONGHAIR TDK stopped making their excellent deep blue metal cyanine CDRs with 16X.. Everything else has just been rebranded whatever they can find cheap. Sometimes it is Taiyo Yuden, but more often poor quality CMC and Ritek. TDK is a crapshoot anymore.
     
  14. bookime wood

    bookime wood

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    What are you trying to sell me old chap?? I know what works and what does not in MY SYSTEM, I have burned huge numbers of cds, and for all of my burns, I have never had a read error in 1 off my back ups, my discs/data/audio have never given me anything other than what I have put on them, my pref speed 4x



    bookime
     
  15. slipe

    slipe

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    I’m not really trying to sell you anything. You’re trying to sell froghopper something I don’t agree with – not on your system but on his. In two successive posts you told him that slow burning is the way to go. I check my error rates and know what I’m getting. I’ve also read tests that often show higher error rates at very low speed on fast burners than burning at high speeds. This is from Andy McFaddens CD Recordable FAQ:
    ”Put simply, there's more to writing at high speed than just spinning faster. It's entirely possible that writing slowly to "high-speed" media will produce significantly worse results than writing to it quickly.”

    I’ve seen recommendations to notch one speed down. If you have a 52X recorder and 52X media you might do better on error rate at 48X or even 40X. But that doesn’t always hold true in tests and often the best quality is at 52X. But burning at 4X not only takes excessively long but often degrades the recording quality. I’ve never had a read error after a successful burn either and usually burn at the maximum speed of the media. I also rarely get coasters and have never had a buffer underrun error on a burner with burn-proof. I get the very rare spit-out with a “read error” message, always with El Cheapos.

    You say you get buffer underruns on a burner with buffer underrun protection. I think I would want to figure out why. You say you get spit-outs and bad burns if you burn at high speed. I would also try to find out why. I’m not suggesting you do that, but I will disagree if you suggest to someone else that they burn at low speed with a high speed burner and media because of the limitations of your system.
     
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