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Database driven website inquiry

Discussion in 'Web Design & Development' started by inspired78, Apr 5, 2010.

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  1. inspired78

    inspired78 Thread Starter

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    Hi!

    I'm developing a website that is very database driven but I'm not sure what to use....php, asp, mysql, excel...etc? I have a lot of experience developing front end websites, so this back end database thing is all new to me!

    The main website features will be:

    - login feature & members area (storing members details in database)
    - storing members contact info (eg. email) so I can contact them with reminders automatically
    - rating system
    - search system

    Any ideas please? Any good tutorials on how to implement these features?

    Thank you!
     
  2. Grob needs help

    Grob needs help

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    i would recommend using php and mysql there are good tutorials on http://www.w3schools.org and if there is any other problems just ask Google for code it will most likely have all you need. else ask here
     
  3. omuyelijah

    omuyelijah

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    Hi,

    You can google DATABASE DRIVEN WEBSITE (WITH PHP/MYSQL) by Kevin Yank. Its a good book. Just follow the link.
     
  4. inspired78

    inspired78 Thread Starter

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    Aw thank you!

    Is it particularly easy to do a database driven website like the one I described above?
     
  5. tomdkat

    tomdkat Retired Trusted Advisor

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    If you design things well, it should be pretty easy to setup and get working.

    Peace...
     
  6. ehymel

    ehymel

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  7. lordsmurf

    lordsmurf

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    I used to like Coldfusion for this, back in the day.
    I used pre-made CMS now (WordPress, Magento, vBulletin, etc) -- not much interest in "from scratch" programming now.
     
  8. olddirtret

    olddirtret

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  9. lordsmurf

    lordsmurf

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    Joomla/Drupal/Mambo is a dying CMS. It had a great run as a first-generation CMS style, but it's being replaced by WordPress. Joomla hasn't really had any major advancements in 2 years now, and it was never really user friendly to setup.
     
  10. olddirtret

    olddirtret

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    Good grief Lordsmurf, that is a pretty big put down of Joomla. I would be curious to know what information you have to back up that statement..

    If Joomla is such a dying CMS, then why are people still using it.?

    I would say those that lacked good knowledge of the internet or how their website even worked would chose Wordpress over Joomla.
     
  11. tomdkat

    tomdkat Retired Trusted Advisor

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    I agree with Lordsmurf on Joomla. A friend of mine had a site in Joomla that he asked me to make some cosmetic changes to and I found Joomla to be a complete PITA and I couldn't make all the changes he needed because I couldn't access the appropriate files from within Joomla. (n)

    I haven't used Drupal so I can't comment on that.

    Given how easy Wordpress is to use, I think some with outstanding knowledge of the Internet and how websites work would choose Wordpress over Joomla. :D LOL

    My first exposure to Joomla was to make layout changes to the page template and I could only do so much from within Joomla and the guy who created the site initially had to make the rest since I just didn't have access to the files.

    My first exposure to Wordpress was to get it embedded in an existing website and I was able to create a Wordpress template and accomplish the goal.

    Both were painful experiences but I was able to succeed with Wordpress while I was not with Joomla.

    Now, before you lump me in the "lacks good knowledge of the Internet or how websites work" group, look at my posts in this forum and other forums here to gauge my knowledge level and then we can talk about my experience. :)

    Peace...
     
  12. olddirtret

    olddirtret

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    Tomdkat my intent was not to lump anyone into that category. I was trying to state that people may find it easier to use Wordpress then Joomla depending upon their developing skills. That said, I have built many websites using Joomla. After giving instructions to the web site owners, they don't have any problem maintaining the site themselves.

    I too have used Wordpress & Drupal along with Joomla with favorable results. Yes, there is a learning curve to Joomla as there is to Wordpress and Drupal.

    I started out with an introduction to computers in the Air Force in 1968 and have worked with computers ever since. So I have seen a lot over the years. I have programmed in many different languages and am always willing to move on if I find something that works better. Right now, I like what Joomla has to offer for web development. Could my choice change, anything is possible.

    So it wasn't anything personal.
     
  13. tomdkat

    tomdkat Retired Trusted Advisor

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    I disagree with this as well. :) LOL

    I think people might prefer one over the other for a variety of reasons:
    • Ease of use
    • Extensibility and configurability
    • Features
    • Security
    • Performance

    Those are things that will or can be of interest to anyone, regardless of their developing skills. The reason I got involved with my friend's Joomla-based site is because he had no clue on how to make the changes he wanted made. He could add and change content easily and he had no issues with that. What caught my by surprise is my inability to access ALL of the files relating to the template from within Joomla itself. I used its file manager function and other functions to navigate around to locate the files I needed to modify. I ended up having to save the rendered page in my browser, make the changes locally, and have my friend tell the guy who setup the site in the first place to change the files I couldn't access from within Joomla. This had nothing to do with my developing skills and had everything to do with the fact I had never used Joomla before. When I created the Wordpress template, I was in the same boat. I had never used Wordpress before.

    I thnk Lordsmurf's main point is the CMS "world" is trending more toward the Wordpress-like approach than toward the "traditional" Drupal/Joomla approach. I was recently exposed to another CMS called "CushyCMS". It appears to be far easier to use than anything I had seen previously but I don't know how functional it is or what it's feature set is. The main attraction of CushyCMS seems to be shielding the user from the "details" of how the CMS works to allow them to focus on the content, which should be the focus of using a CMS in the first place.

    One doesn't use Joomla or Drupal or whatever because they want to know as much as possible about how those systems work. They use those system to manage the content the want to publish easily or relatively easily.

    The CMS that offers the power, functionality, security, and ease of use will be what people use regardless of their skill set.

    Peace...
     
  14. olddirtret

    olddirtret

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    :eek::eek: I think were are saying the same thing but we are looking at it in a different light. LOL

    When a question is asked on the forum by a person, that person is looking for some sort of direction. Once we in the forum give them some ideas, then that person asking the question has some areas to check out.

    My original post gave links to look at. Once inspired78 looked at those links, then they could decide if that is what will work for them. If they didn't like what they saw, at least they can make the decision whether to try it or not. But by saying that Joomla is dying, that doesn't help the person asking the question. Now that plants a seed in their mind that the links are not worth looking at and they would never think about Joomla as an option.

    I do thank you for the CushyCMS info. I'll be taking a look at it.

    I do disagree with this statement in my case, because I'm a programmer and enjoy working with code.

    One doesn't use Joomla or Drupal or whatever because they want to know as much as possible about how those systems work.

    But that's just me and shouldn't be applied to anyone else
     
  15. tomdkat

    tomdkat Retired Trusted Advisor

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    LOL Ok, let's see. :)

    Yep, I agree.

    I disagree. The point about Joomla dying simply provides more "food for thought", especially since Wordpress was also mentioned. This kind of feedback helps, IMO, since it helps paint a better picture of the current landscape. This doesn't necessarily mean lordsmurf is right by virtue of posting his comments but only that this kind of "pro/con" commentary helps more than it hinders unless a debate occurs which heads down a completely different path. :)

    That's cool. I'm also a programmer and I also enjoy working with code. The thing is, if I'm doing something for someone else, I can't simply use the tools or technologies I prefer or am most familiar with. I have to use the tools or technologies that I'm capable of using (or learning) that will work well with the capabilities of the person I'm assisting. If I prefer to work with PHP and I'm helping someone with their HTML 4.01 website, I won't tell them they have to convert their site to PHP and force them to have to learn PHP, etc.

    If I wanted to learn the internals and externals of Joomla, I would install it, configure it, and deploy a site on it. However, this would be because I wanted to learn about it, not because of the things I listed on the list above. This would be part of an educational experience, not one of a practical application. If I was seeking a practical application of a CMS to use for a site, my perspective wouldn't be from an educational standpoint but from a "is this the best tool for the job" standpoint.

    Personally, I wouldn't touch Joomla with a 10' pole even though the geek in me tells me I really should install it and configure it to give it a "fair chance". :)

    Peace...
     
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