DNS Servers?

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C0aster

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I'm trying to forward some ports on my router, and when adjusting "Internet Protocol", I am missing a "DNS Server address". When I go to run>command> ipconfig /all, I only see a single address beside "DNS Servers". Does it mean that the Preffered and Alternate DNS server are identical--that one address? Help would be appreciated,
Ty.
 

Couriant

James
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Your DNS server will be your router if you don't have an actual DNS server.

I'm assuming you are talking about about the TCP/IP properties right?
 
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Acrtually what Tidus4Yuna said is 1/2 true.

I am hearing that some routers pass only their own IP as the DNS server but in reality if you check out the router (or call your ISP) you should see your ISP has about 2-3 different DNS servers.

If you only want your router to hand DNS then leave the 1 IP for the router and let it "pass through" you also can hardcode the different ISP DNS servers as well. It will perform the same function in reality. The reasons ISP's have multiple DNS servers is for redundancy sake.

Most people are content to leave the 1 router IP in the DNS because if their router goes down they lose internet connectivity anyway. if your like this then you can do is put the DNS server IP in perferred and leave the Secondary blank.

Secondary is always a backup in case the perferred can't be contacted so duplicating it into secondary will do nothing for you.
 

C0aster

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Well, I've called my ISP and received two DNS Servers! Though, they seem to be different from the two that my router gave me when I went into router configuration via typing in default ip into address bar, why is this so?
 
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It could be that the ISP has 4 DNS servers total you have 2 in the router and 2 that are not currently assigned to you but in use by others. It aslo could be some are being "phased out" and others"newer ones" are being added and now you have the latest IP's of the newer DNS servers.

the main thing to make sure is that they are resolving DNS properly and the easiest way is to put each of the 4 into your primary but do not have ANY in the secondaary and type in a domain name I.E. www.google.com if it resolves you know the name servers doing its job if it doesn't you know you probably should not use it.
 

C0aster

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Do you mean put ALL of them into the primary at once, or to test each of them out, separately? Thanks.
 

C0aster

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By the way, I'm trying to set up a Static IP address. I'm finding this rather confusing, due to the vagueness of some sites--portforward.com and homenethelp.com. When setting up a static IP, homenethelp.com says to enter the router address - 192.168.10.1 - as the DNS (a single DNS), yet portforward.com says to use two DNS servers provided from the ISP. Yikes! Anyone good at this type of thing?
 
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Both are right...

You can do it either way as I explained DNS is just resolving X.X.X.X to hot.net or whatever. Routers will usually forward from their WAN to their IP making them act as a DNS passthrough. so technically you can put in either.

When hardcoding what you want to do is get an IPCONFIG /all from your PC before you take it off DHCP.

Then you want to go into your router and check the DHCP lease section - you want to note the starting number of the leases usuaully X.X.X.100 and then the number of leases I,.E. 50 in this scenario you want your hardcode to be outside of 100 to 150 (I.E. hardcode and DHCP should never be in the same "pool")

then once you have this information you take your IPCONFIG /all and startt hardcoding it in your TCP/Ip properties with the exception of the IP address put in the first 3 numbers I.E. X.X.X.blank and then in the blank portion pick a number that is NOT the IP of the router and is NOT in the 100-150 range (substitute 100-150 for the things you found on the router).

Lastly write down the IP address you pick and then go back into the router to the port forwarding section. you put the beginning port and the end port and TCP/UDP information in there and put the IP information you wrtoe down in the IP field (may only need the last octet of the IP).

What your doing is saying instead of letting my router assign an IP I am making the IP be the same ALWAYS so this way in the router I can specify this always used IP to be the one the ports go to. Otherwise if you use DHCP if you have 2 computers and one takes the others lease then the wrong computer may have ports forwarded to it.
 

C0aster

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StumpedTechy said:
Lastly write down the IP address you pick and then go back into the router to the port forwarding section. you put the beginning port and the end port and TCP/UDP information in there and put the IP information you wrtoe down in the IP field (may only need the last octet of the IP).
Port forwarding section, hmmm... When I enter router settings, I'm directed to some page that shows IP address, default gateway, primary & secondary DNS servers, etc; do you mean that I should alter this accordingly to TCP/UDP properties?
 

Couriant

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C0aster said:
By the way, I'm trying to set up a Static IP address. I'm finding this rather confusing, due to the vagueness of some sites--portforward.com and homenethelp.com. When setting up a static IP, homenethelp.com says to enter the router address - 192.168.10.1 - as the DNS (a single DNS), yet portforward.com says to use two DNS servers provided from the ISP. Yikes! Anyone good at this type of thing?
From what you said, I think homenethelp.com is assuming your router has your ISP DNS information (which is usually the case) and you are getting your info/routing from the router whereas portforward.com is getting you to enter the information statically into the TCP/IP properties of the NIC card.
 
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Port forwarding section, hmmm... When I enter router settings, I'm directed to some page that shows IP address, default gateway, primary & secondary DNS servers, etc; do you mean that I should alter this accordingly to TCP/UDP properties?
No I mean there is a section that will say port forwarding, forward ports, or open ports, or maybe just ports. usualy its in list format and you have to put in the following -

Port/s that you want open, select tcp or udp or both, and the IP of the PC you just hardcoded.

You should not have to address anythign in the WAN section of the router at all.
 

C0aster

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I did, and i'm done. Thanks. Though, for some reason, I had to turn off my WinXp firewall after 'forwarding' ports in order to actually 'host'. I now have one firewall up instead of one, does the router's firewall provide adequate protection, alone? Or was it redundant having two firewalls? Ty.
 
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