Dual Core proc question.

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rentonhighlands

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I am shopping for a new laptop and when I read ads it states for example "Intel Core 2 Duo Processor E2160 1.8GHz." What does this mean? I believe it means 1 proc dual core but my question is does each prco run at 1.8GHz and the total speed is 3.6GHz. Or it is just 1 proc running at 1.8GHz? Can any forum menber point me to some articals that will explain this and show what "what is important specs or processor to look for." Thank-you
 

rentonhighlands

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Nov 19, 2007
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I am shopping for a new laptop and when I read ads it states for example "Intel Core 2 Duo Processor E2160 1.8GHz." What does this mean? I believe it means 1 proc dual core but my question is does each prco run at 1.8GHz and the total speed is 3.6GHz. Or it is just 1 proc running at 1.8GHz? Can any forum menber point me to some articals that will explain this and show what "what is important specs or processor to look for." Thank-you
 
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I am shopping for a new laptop and when I read ads it states for example "Intel Core 2 Duo Processor E2160 1.8GHz." What does this mean? I believe it means 1 proc dual core but my question is does each prco run at 1.8GHz and the total speed is 3.6GHz. Or it is just 1 proc running at 1.8GHz? Can any forum menber point me to some articals that will explain this and show what "what is important specs or processor to look for." Thank-you
Essentially it means that you have one processor with TWO 1.8ghz cores in it BUT this does not give you a total processing speed of 3.6ghz. It simply means that with the two working in tandem you'll accomplish most computing tasks in less time.
 

fairnooks

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That's a very good question. I think the industry is struggling right now to express performance capability in terms we can understand and its difficult because the processors do more work per cycle instead of relying on pure speed.

I think you can sort of look at it as a 3.6 Ghz system (actual speed is 1.8 Ghz) but there is a little overhead in the dual processor management and generally one process, no matter how intensive, will not completely max out both processors so you can still operate the system minimally for other tasks, which can be a terrific improvement over one processor systems for such a user, and as mentioned earlier, each processor cycle does more work. The E in front of the number stands for the power use of the processors which in this case is 25-49 W (X in front is high power consumption of 75 W or so) and as the number goes up it usually either means a bump in the speed or an increase in the on-board L2 memory cache. The E2160 is designed to be a very economical and energy efficient entry level cpu and I believe it is actually a Dual Core chip not a Core 2 Duo which adds to the confusion but if you have the option look instead to the Core 2 Duo models even though the E2160 is a more recent addition.
 

crjdriver

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It is two cpu cores running @1.8. It is not a 3.6mzh system. Dual core or multi cpus make running multiple apps at the same time easier. It is not going to make your system run like one with a 3.6mzh cpu; it is just not going to slow down as much when you open more than one app at a time.
 

crjdriver

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I merged these threads together. In the future do not post multiple threads for the same issue.
 
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