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Solved Dual monitor, video card setup (not SLI or crossfire)

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by acesnick, Oct 6, 2019.

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  1. acesnick

    acesnick Thread Starter

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    I have a geforce 1060 graphics card from my old pc and I am planning to build a new desktop. I am planning to build a Amd ryzen 3900 with 5700xt on it. however, I don't want to waste (or sell) my still good graphics card so I am planning to use it in this system as dual.

    I know if I tried to use 2 graphics card on pci express x16, both of them will down to 8x. planning to play 2 games at the same time ( world of warcraft on 1060 and borderlands 3 on 5700xt)

    my cpu cooler is cooler master hyper 212 evo. 6 120mm fan top and front. 850 thermaltake psu. 32gb mem 3000.

    not sure if its overkill but its within my budget.

    so my questions are:

    is it possible to setup 2 dual video card on 2 monitors and play games at the same time?

    is my cooling gonna be enough?

    Thank you!
     
  2. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522

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    Not necessarily....most modern mobo will do x16 for GPU's.

    Yes...but not in the way you want. You'll need some specialized software and/or hardware for that. You're essentially wanted to turn one PC into two. The only example I've ever run accross was a temp service I was hired through back in the day. 2 people, 1 tower, 2 monitors doing independent work.

    I could be completely wrong here.....so you might want to do some googling on this matter.
     
  3. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522

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    I found this.....seems a bit complicated.....but here you go.

     
  4. Shazzalive

    Shazzalive

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    Sharron
    What you're saying is that you want to run 2 graphics cards in the same PC. - Both from the same motherboard's PCIe x 16 slots - and play a different game on each of 2 monitors that are individually plugged into each graphics card.

    I'm answering this thread because - on one of my machines - I run 3 monitors - 2 HDMI from an MSI AMD Radeon RX 580 8GB ARMOR 8G OC Graphics Card as well as one VGA from an an Asus GeForce GT 710 2GB DDR3 Graphics card on an Asus PRIME X470-PRO AM4 DDR4 ATX Motherboard. (Powered with an AMD Ryzen 5 2600 AM4 Processor .)

    I've never tried playing 2 games at once. I'm crap enough playing one game at once as it is. I dread to think how ultra-sucky and cringeworthy I'd be if I even tried.

    The thing is that the MSI AMD Radeon RX 580 is plugged into the mobo's x16 slot with a power feed from the PSU; while the Asus GeForce GT 710 is plugged into the x8 slot below it... Because the Asus GeForce GT 710 is only a x8 lane card anyway... which is OK since I only use it for VGA. The RX580 still runs at x16 - but that's because I'm running a good motherboard there.

    You can use 2 graphics cards on the same motherboard and run them at x16 each; but you'll have to change your motherboard and CPU: HEDT boards can use two 16x slots at the same time (e.g., X399 for AMD, X299 for Intel). The Asus ws z390 pro has got a plx chip - which you'll need, as has the Supermicro C9Z390-PGW ... But these are specialist performance boards that come with all kinds of issues and require constant tuning and maintenance... Having said that I'm not sure whether or not you get more PCIe lanes and in the way needed with a 3rd Generation Ryzen CPU.

    All this still hasn't fully answered your question; in fact it's probably just made things more confusing, but I hope it helps.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2019
  5. acesnick

    acesnick Thread Starter

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    I guess it looks complicated the way linus explain but that basically is what I was asking. I currently have a dual monitor setup on my 1060 and I can multitask while gaming but not playing 2 games (gaming and browsing).

    I guess the best way is to do is just stick with 5700xt as its powerful enough for dual monitor setup. And invest on cooling and processor.

    Out of the topic, is cooler master 212 evo enough to cool up amd ryzen 3900x or 3800x ? Planning to overclock it around 10-15% (gonna try). and is 750w psu enough?

    Thanks for all the replys.
     
  6. Shazzalive

    Shazzalive

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    The Scythe Mugen 5 with a fan on each side (2 sides) + a case intake and exhaust fan is my recommendation for the best cooling solution to use. Even with overclocking this setup should keep your system in the clear temperature-wise.

    A 750W PSU should be ample for the job.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2019
    acesnick likes this.
  7. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522

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    I have the exact same cooler. It's good enough for basic OC'ing by 1 or 2 points (from 3.0 to 3.1/3.2) for short term use. When pushing 5 points or more, that'll be pushing that cooler.

    For OC'ing..... the recommendations are for a AIO water cooled set up. Especially if you're going to OC 10% to 15% on a regular basis.
     
  8. Shazzalive

    Shazzalive

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    I bet the Mugen 5 setup I suggested works great. Liquid cooling has drawbacks, and although it cools a few percent better than air-cooling when new, it is generally less efficient in terms of longevity.
     
  9. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522

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    I totally agree....I'm not a fan of liquid cooling at all.

    As stated...liquid cooling is better and more efficient for OC'ing for long term over clocks. Especially when the RAD is setup (fan orientation) correctly. The newer technology being implemented in liquid cooling makes them more efficient. Back in the day that ideology held true.....for a mere 3° drop wasn't worth it. Now the CPU's use less power and produce less heat and therefore take less to cool. Newer AIO liquid cooling technology keeps improving the pumps efficiency and longevity and in return has more significant drop in temps over air cooling.

    No doubt your suggested cooler will do the job as well as other well known air coolers.
     
    Shazzalive likes this.
  10. acesnick

    acesnick Thread Starter

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    I know I marked this solved but I want to say that I came from corsair h50 liquid cooling. I have it since 2015 and I have no way of checking if it still works or not. (well i dont know how). But suddenly my cpu is overheating. 50-60 on idle. at least on heatsink and fan, i can still see if its doing his job. and the hyper evo 212 I heard is a good one.
     
  11. Shazzalive

    Shazzalive

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    Possibly the coolant flow has somehow blocked, or maybe the pump motor has died. I wouldn't be surprised to see either happen on liquid cooling of that age.
     
  12. acesnick

    acesnick Thread Starter

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    My thoughts exactly. That's why I will go back to heatsink/fan cooler.
     
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