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Dual Router Configuration

Discussion in 'Networking' started by rpndt1, Jan 16, 2005.

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  1. rpndt1

    rpndt1 Thread Starter

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    Is there any security benefit (extra firewall, etc) from using two routers to connect to the internet. For example, this computer connects to port 1 on my Netgear. From the WAN port, a wire connects the port 4 of my Dlink. The WAN port of my DLink connects, of course, to my modem and the Internet. second question...how do I access the secondary router. Anytime I type in "192.168.0.1", I only access the DLink interface. (I was confused about configuring the Static IP on the secondary Netgear so I left it as is) Any ideas/ suggestions. Can I somehow use this dual router to my benefit?

    I have a Netgear (RP614) and DLink (DI 714P+). Networking has always somewhat eluded me, and I was wondering what benefits/unique configurations may be derived from two routers.

    Here is the setup.

    Thanks in advance

    -R
     
  2. coulterp

    coulterp

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    None. Once you've NAT'ed once in the first router, what's the point of trying to do it again in a second router!
    In fact using two routers as you've pictured is just extra configurational grief to be had - as you have already found given you cannot access the second router.
    In short: no gain, lotta pain.
     
  3. rpndt1

    rpndt1 Thread Starter

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    at least it looks cool on my desk ;)

    Thanks for the advice. So there is nothing I can really do with an extra router?
    Could you explain about the "NAT?" please, also, just for future reference?
     
  4. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    If you want to protect a subset of your machines on a LAN from others, still allowing all to have shared Internet, you can use that router. Another use, one that I'm using here, is to have two wireless routers, one at each end of a large house. They provide coverage for the whole house with good signal strength. For that application:

    Connecting two SOHO broadband routers together.

    Configure the IP address of the secondary router to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address.

    Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

    Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router.

    Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. Leave the WAN port unconnected!
     
  5. coulterp

    coulterp

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    Agree with johnwill; you could use your two routers like that. But if your network consists of 2 PCs then two separate LANS is not a lot of use! :D

    NAT - Network Address Translation. NAT, among other things, provides a type of firewall by hiding yor internal IP address from the outside world. NAT translates your public IP to a subnet of private IP addresses allowing you to run multiple PCs off a single external IP address.
     
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