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Error 0x80070522: A required privilege is not held by the client

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by Tony414, Nov 3, 2011.

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  1. Tony414

    Tony414 Thread Starter

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    Hello,
    I've been search everywhere for a solution to this. I am hoping someone can help. I have some new Windows 7 machines on my domain. I have an older program that's installed and it needs to allow users to write and excute files on the c:\ drive (root). I know this is not a good thing but it's just they way they wrote it. How can I accomplish this? I've tried a number of things already like disabling UAC and LUA in the registry. That didn't work. Any help would be great!

    Thanks,
    Tony
     
  2. valis

    valis Moderator

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    do the users have admin access? Have you tested it with admin access to see if that solves it?
     
  3. Tony414

    Tony414 Thread Starter

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    No, users do not have admin access. And Yes, when I log in as administrator either local or domain it is fine. I even tried setting the security tab to allow everyone full control which I know is wrong and that didn't work either. I'm at a loss.
     
  4. valis

    valis Moderator

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    At what point does the error show up? Is there a way to change the area that the app writes to? We also had a very similar error with some W7 builds, had to have the dev group redesign where the app wrote to. That solved it, but dunno if it will in your case.
     
  5. Tony414

    Tony414 Thread Starter

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    It happens when the program tried to write files to the root of c:\. I already asked the vendor that. It's an older program and they can't change where it writes too.
     
  6. jiml8

    jiml8 Guest

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    You'll either have to relax the permissions to write to the root of C:, which is a really really bad idea, or you will need to set up a security policy permitting this program and only this program to have administrator permissions regardless of who runs it. I cannot tell you offhand how to do that; I've done it before but it's been years and I last did it on XP Pro.

    About ten years ago, I had the problem of making a Harry Potter game work on my laptop for my daughter's use. The OS was XP Pro and my daughter had a user account, while the Harry Potter game refused to run unless the user was an administrator...and there was no way in the world I was going to give my 8 year old daughter admin rights on that machine.

    I wound up creating a service that my daughter had the right to start and stop, and I set up a batch file invoked by double-clicking on a desktop icon to start/stop the service. I set up a security policy permitting that service to run with admin privileges and my daughter could therefore play her game by putting the CD into the drive then double-clicking on the script icon.

    According to my notes, I used the srvany.exe tool (I don't know if this is still around, but it allowed any program to be invoked as a service) running with system privileges and allowed to access the desktop. I then used the management console to set up a security template that included all the current security policies plus the policy that permitted a user to start/stop the HarryPotter service.

    That worked fine, and the approach you want to take is along those lines. Whether establishing a service is the best way to go is something for you to determine. Worked for me.
     
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