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Extend wifi beyond house

Discussion in 'Networking' started by testy, Nov 8, 2013.

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  1. testy

    testy Thread Starter

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    I would like to have wifi in my shed/workshop, which is all steel construction. Even standing outside the door, I'm at the limit of our household wifi, so I'm wondering what options I have? An ethernet cable would be one I'm sure, but a little difficult to run. I've seen reference to networking via the electric power supply cables, but don't understand it. Would I still need a router in the shed? I'd really like some kind of hot spot, because I mostly use my tablet which doesn't have broadband, or an ethernet port.







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  2. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    How far apart are the two buildings?
     
  3. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Also, do you have line-of-sight between the buildings? Between a window in each building?
     
  4. testy

    testy Thread Starter

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    From my router to the shed, about 15 metres. No, I don't have line of sight at all. I do have an ethernet cable to the roof of the shed from an old satellite broadband dish, but when I dismantled the dish, I cut the cable, and I don't have the tools to fit a new end onto it. Is that worth considering?
     
  5. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    15 metres, if line of sight, is no problem for 802.11g or better. But with obstacles it's impossible to predict anything.
     
  6. testy

    testy Thread Starter

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    Sorry, I don't know what 802.11g means.
     
  7. testy

    testy Thread Starter

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    Ah, I just checked my router, and see that it's 802.11 compliant.
     
  8. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Not going to try to describe the 802.11g specification, but the point is that 802.11g is good for up to 300 feet line of sight. 802.11n up to 1500 (or 1400?) feet.
     
  9. testy

    testy Thread Starter

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    What about an external antenna on my router, to at least get the signal out of the house? My router is a Netcomm 3g 11n router with a little stick antenna.
    Hmm.., I have seen mention somewhere of using another router as a repeater. My model is now only $50 here in Australia, so cost comparison with an antenna seems reasonable when I take into account the job of running the antenna lead. If I did that, would I have the same situation in the shed as I have in the house, in terms of connectibility? And do you have any comment on the power adapters? I have looked online, and see that they are available with wifi built in, but a little pricey.
     
  10. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Power adapters work great in many cases; poorly or not at all in others. Depends on the quality of the electrical system and I have no idea how to determine except by trial and error.

    The fewer and less serious obstacles you have in the path between the antennas of two Wi-Fi devices the stronger and more reliable the signal should be.
     
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