1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

Extending broadband network to “garden” building

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Susanc1975, Feb 3, 2020.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. Susanc1975

    Susanc1975 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2020
    Messages:
    2
    Hi all ... I have limited tech experience, but usually not too bad ... until this!

    I live in a very rural location - so getting my own Broadband line will be too costly. The building closest to me has Broadband and I am permitted to use this for our house. I have tried using a TP Link WiFi extender ... this has had limited success, and since a new BTHub6 was installed as the main router, this hasn’t worked at all. So I decided to install an Ethernet cable and use an old router as a slave to give me broadband and WiFi in the house. I have installed a 100m Ethernet cable. I have read various “how to” instructions for setting up this second router in my house - but it doesn’t seem to be working. The second router is flashing orange and has no broadband .... but I am able on occasion to get wireless access on my phone, however, none of my other devices (Now Tv and Apple TV) will connect to the internet. I have checked the main router and all seems ok - so I am at a loss as to what to do. Any ideas? Many thanks in advance.
     
  2. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Messages:
    79,851
    First Name:
    Terry
    Permission from the ISP? Can you give us a link to something that shows this permission?

    How is it that the building close to you can get broadband but it is too costly for you?

    NOTE to other potential helpers: just a reminder--please hold off on posting until one of us mods or admins says it's OK for us to help.
     
  3. Susanc1975

    Susanc1975 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2020
    Messages:
    2
    Thanks Terry ... I live on a Private Highland Estate, and the building closest to me is part of the estate. As I am an estate worker I can use the WiFi - but as our estate is on an island - only 2 phone and broadband lines on the whole island - fed by an underwater cable - BT have said to put a new line from the exchange on the mainland would be expensive
     
  4. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Messages:
    79,851
    First Name:
    Terry
    I think that you cannot make that up so I am buying it. :)

    I think that 100m is the maximum for ethernet, so that may be a problem. If you have a computer with ethernet capability try connecting that to see how it works (see if the signal is good).

    If you are daisy-chaining the second router (connecting to its WAN port) it must use a different LAN subnet than the primary router uses. For example, if the primary router is using 192.168.1.x for LAN IPs then use, say, 192.168.2.x on the second router. If both routers use the same LAN subnet usually there is no internet access for the second router or else its internet access is unreliable.

    Just as good and sometimes better is to use the second router as only an ethernet switch and wireless access point. Instructions for this follow.

    JohnWill's procedure (Aug. 30, 2008) for configuring a secondary router as a switch and, optionally, wireless access point follows.

    Connecting two (or more) SOHO broadband routers together.

    Note: The "primary" router can be an actual router, a software gateway like Microsoft Internet Connection Sharing, or a server connection that has the capability to supply more than one IP address using DHCP server capability. No changes are made to the primary "router" configuration.

    Configure the IP address of the secondary router(s) to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address, 192.168.0.253 for another router, etc.

    Note: Do this first, as you will have to reboot the computer to connect to the router again for the remaining changes.

    Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

    Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router, channels, encryption, etc.

    Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. [You will not need a cross-over cable if one of the "routers" is a computer.] Leave the WAN port unconnected! [TerryNet Note: assume that all routers made in the last five or six years or more have auto-sensing ports.]

    This procedure bypasses the routing function (NAT layer) and configures the router as a switch (or wireless access point for wireless routers).
     
As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/1239665

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice