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FAT or NTFS

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by SteveOH, Sep 11, 2003.

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  1. SteveOH

    SteveOH Thread Starter

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    What's the difference and which is better for the average home user? Does it really make a difference?:confused:
     
  2. PaulV

    PaulV

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    Hi SteveOH,

    FAT is the file allocation table (FAT) and its what windows uses to manage the drive drive.
    NTFS is the NT File System used by NT operating systems.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    QUOTE]Originally posted by SteveOH:
    Does it really make a difference?:confused: [/QUOTE]
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Well that depends on how your going to use it. If its a home machine,with one or two users and a limited need for folder level security FAT32 is fine.
    However, if its going to be used in an environment where many people and users have access to it , NTFS is the way to go.

    Paul
     
  3. mobo

    mobo

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    The two main reasons for going to NTFS are its stability and security....
     
  4. Cookies

    Cookies

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    FAT systems use little storage; but typically don't support longer file names like "my_stuff123456789". FAT systems also tend to degrade with large volumes, sometimes waste space; however, they tend to be reliable.

    NTFS allows for longer file names like "my_stuff123456789", have better security, the kernel tends to be more stable (less BSOD's - blue screens of death), and allows larger volumes and file sharing.

    There's much more information than what I've provided here. TechTV has some detail here:

    http://www.techtv.com/screensavers/windowstips/story/0,24330,3201552,00.html

    Two things to keep in mind when deciding:

    1) Think of a FAT partion as a 1970 Mustang and an NTFS Partition as a 2004 Pontiac GTO.. . The Mustang can't see the GTO (because it hasn't yet been developed). Therefore, Mustang (FAT) applications (software and such) can't see the GTO (NTFS) partitions because it hasn't been developed yet. If you format to NTFS and remove your FAT some applications may not function.

    2) You can have your cake and eat it, too. Dual boot. You can have your FAT and NTFS too.

    Edit: Did I say "...format to NTFS and remove your FAT"?? Sounds like an easy weight loss reduction program :)
     
  5. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    Uhh... FAT file systems have supported long file names since W95. :)
     
  6. Cookies

    Cookies

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    You're correct...whoops - sorry!
     
  7. Rusty1952

    Rusty1952

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    Also, NTFS has the nice advantage of supporting file sizes larger than the FAT32 limitation of 4GB or so . This can be useful for Mpeg2 AVI, DVD (NTSC 525), etc., Video Capture applications which can really eat up alota hard disk space where you wouldn't want to break up the larger file size to smaller ones. A definite plus there, I have found.
     
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