1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

Faulty DC Jack on laptop

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by jayjay22, Jan 24, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. jayjay22

    jayjay22 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2006
    Messages:
    23
    Hello, I am trying to repair a DC Power jack on a toshiba satellite 2435. The computer will not take a charge at all even from a new power cord. If you wiggle the cord enough my sister says the charge light comes on very briefly once in awhile. I have not seen this happen. I do notice that the large center pin in the center of the DC Jack is slightly loose and wiggles back and forth. Possible from the cord being tripped over? I would assume that the pin should be solid and stationary in he Jack. I have already disassembled the laptop down to having the motherboard on my desk with full access to the DC Jack. What I would like to ask is whether the solder joints look OK. My soldering skills are amateur at best. All the solder joints for the DC Jack are yellowish/brown. I'm not sure if this is ok? Posted is a picture. I'd appreciate any feedback i can get as to whether the whole jack should be replaced, just resolder some joints, or anything else you can tell me. Also, anyone know a really good soldering tutorial online. Thanks alot in advance for the help.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. johnpost

    johnpost

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2005
    Messages:
    317
    if the pin is wiggling then it needs more than solder to fix.
    it should be rigid in the jack assembly soldered or not.

    a bad repair or a repair that fails, which is
    likely because it is a powerjack and gets
    lots or wear and tear, could damage
    the computer in a serious and expensive
    manner. don't try it.

    so i would replace the jack assembly with
    an exact replacement. if it is for someone
    who wants a reliable working machine
    then it should be replaced.

    if you aren't skilled then take to a shop
    or find a skilled person.
     
  3. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2002
    Messages:
    106,418
    Truthfully, from the picture, I don't think the jack is the issue. You've had a loose connection that has been cooking away because of the high resistance.

    Just to be safe, it's probably a good idea to replace the jack, but you are going to have to be VERY CAREFUL soldering to that board, since it's already damaged. If I were repairing it, I'd be considering running a bus wire from the nearest place that pin goes to the jack connection, since I suspect you're not going to get a good connection directly.

    www.laptopjacks.com has exact replacements. Not that cheap, but for hard to find parts, you pay a premium.

    This is what they look like if you ignore the problem too long.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. jayjay22

    jayjay22 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2006
    Messages:
    23
    Thanks for the replies guys, I think I need to clarify a few things. I have not yet attempted the repair, i've done no soldering yet. The way it looks in the picture is how it looks when I took it out of the laptop. Also, that thing that looks like a black spot in the middle of the six solder points is actually just a plastic support pin for the jack. I guess from what I've heard and from my own common sense, the best idea is to just attempt a total replacement of the old jack with the new one.
    The laptop belonged to my sister, and when it stopped charging she got a new one. She likes this one better than the new one though. So since I have a degree in the IT field, I told her I would attempt to fix it, with no guarantee that I can successfully do it. She cannot pay a professional $500 to fix it, since quite often the repair shop will not even successfully do it anyway, and if they do, the repair will sometimes not hold, and then you are out $500. I should mention that she had this same problem with the same laptop before, while it was under warranty. The DC Jack was replaced when she sent it away for repair a couple years ago.
    One thing i'd like to know, what is the likelyhood that a repair like this will work, provided I am careful with the solder and replace the jack with a new one? What is the chance that when the jack got broke (or blown, whatever the case may be) it took a part of the board with it? Many thanks for all the great replies, and if anyone has more input, please add it.
     
  5. jayjay22

    jayjay22 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2006
    Messages:
    23
    John, can you give me a bit more clarification on what you mean by this? Thanks much in advance.
     
  6. johnpost

    johnpost

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2005
    Messages:
    317

    if the computer ran well previously when it was on battery or when
    the ac connection was good by having it positioned just right then
    chances can be good the repair, done right, will work.

    even with some soldering skills, circuit boards are far
    different than wire or connector soldering. damage
    can easily be done by too much heat or force,
    the traces on the board are very delicate and
    close together.

    also check prices for the repair now. if the price was $500
    to replace a power jack in an intact computer then it will
    be way less if you bring in the board because they don't
    have to disassemble/reassemble. try a mom and pop
    store, a computer (or tv repair even). you might talk
    them into it for the price of part
    and one hour labor. you need to convince them they
    you will be satisfied with any outcome and will take
    the repair 'as is'.

    also if you know any ham radio operators (especially
    ones middle aged and older) or people
    who build their own stereos they will know how to
    solder. or see if you have people at your work
    that hobby electronics.

    some solder instructions at

    http://www.solderinguide.com/
     
  7. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2002
    Messages:
    106,418
    I've replaced a number of laptop jacks, if you have a decent temperature controlled soldering station and a little skill, they're pretty easy. It's certainly not a job that's worth $500! :eek:

    Since that black is just the plastic (sure looked like a burn), you can probably simply get the new jack and replace it. The last one I got from www.laptopjacks.com was $17 shipped overnight, it was for an HP laptop.

    My technique is to use my Dremel tool and cut the top of the jack off to expose the individual pins. It's much easier to remove them without damaging the board if you can heat them and yank them out one at a time. Sometimes, trying to desolder the whole jack is difficult and risks damage to the MB. After removing the old jack, you just use solder wick to clean up the extra solder and solder the new jack on. Don't forget to clean the resin from the board after removing the jack, and again after soldering the new one on. I use 99% Isopropyl alcohol. Obviously, you want to avoid acid core solder for electronic repairs, use rosin core solder.

    IF you're comfortable disassembling the laptop, but not doing the soldering, it'll be a lot cheaper bringing the bare MB to a tech for the soldering than having them disassemble the laptop. Since the MB is the first thing to go into the case, it's also the last thing to take out.

    When you're disassembling, you need to keep track of where the screws come from, I use a bunch of little plastic bags and label where the screws come from. You'd be amazed how many different lengths of screws are used in a typical laptop. :D
     
  8. jayjay22

    jayjay22 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2006
    Messages:
    23
    johnwill and johnpost thanks for the great replies, very informative. I have already ordered the new jack off ebay from a very reputable seller who deals exclusively in replacement jacks. The jack costed me $10.99 with shipping, with all future shipping free if i ever order another jack from them. Not too bad a deal since laptopjacks.com wants $24.99 + shipping for my particular jack. The jack i got off ebay says it is an OEM part. johnwill, I like your dremel idea, and i have a dremel and love it. However, it will not work in my situation since the jack is flush with the board, with no space between the bottom of the jack and the topside of the mainboard. Unless I actually cut through the entire jack carefully so as not to damage the motherboard, then desolder the pins 1 by 1. Does this sound like a feasible idea? Many thanks again for all your help, it is very much appreciated!(y) :)

    EDIT: I now see where you said "cut through the top of the jack to expose the pins". Sorry, I must have misread it the first time.:eek:
     
  9. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2002
    Messages:
    106,418
    I was referring to cutting the jack basically in half horizontally, you don't want to get the cutting wheel that close to the board. :D Once you hack the top off, it'll normally be possible to desolder and remove individual pins. This works for many PCB mounted components with multiple pins. ;)
     
  10. Pawn3d

    Pawn3d

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2008
    Messages:
    67
    I would love to see a video or pics or that operation! ;)
     
  11. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/537997

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice