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First build....kinda

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by hamdanglin, Jan 18, 2011.

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  1. hamdanglin

    hamdanglin Thread Starter

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    Okay, I have decided to abandon my HP and try my first build. This Is what I have In mind....

    ASUS 84A89GTD PRO
    890GX HDMI SATA
    6Gb/s USB 3 ATX. $100

    Phenom II X6 1055t
    2.8 Ghz 125w. $180

    HEC XP1080W
    800W rms PSU. $80

    Reusing my old
    X2 SATA 7200rpm
    360G HDD's. $0

    For now I will use my old video card. The mobo probably will outperform it anyways. We will see
    how much the prices drop when I get more scratch.
    $0
    Old optidrive
    whatever It is. $0

    Old card reader $0

    Now some input is needed....

    I read the 32bit OS can not utilize more than 3G of RAM?
    Is this true?

    I can't download the memory QVL from ASUS on my phone so if anyone knows of one or could look it up for me that would rock. I was thinkin about only getting one 4g stick to POST with just to start and add more 4G sticks later but not sure what manufacturers are compatible with my MB.

    I previously had Vista Home Premium installed on one of my HDD's. Since I suspect (hope) nothing was affected when my PC formerly known as HP crashed.... What are my chances of plug and play?

    I would eventually like to Install W7 but I will burn that bridge when I get there. Since I am not completely starting from scratch I am not sure what to expect yet so if anyone has tried something similar your input would be great!

    I obviously don't plan on any serious gaming soon until I can afford to support it. Netflix, dvds, and some middle stuff until then. Maybe some TrackMania:)

    Then comes the case...the old enclosure will only receive a square 9.6...the new MB is 12x 9.6. I like the simplicity and look of the Antec 300 for the price. I don't want any plastic crap since I plan on atleast always keeping the case, the 900 is going to bust my budget. I heard someone mention knockoffs of some of the hundred series Antec cases, anyone seen one or used one who could compare It to an Antec? I personally would prefer a case that its more like 75% screws. 4 internal 3.5's and atleast 2x5.5 up front. Cheaper the better but rigidity, space and cooling are priorities.

    That's about all that comes to my mind right now...it's not exactly a full build but its a solid base for honkin' gpu and except for not quite enough space to park to Titanic on the HDD it will last long enough until the Tbytes drop in price.
    Oh yeah...what is raid all about?
     
  2. hamdanglin

    hamdanglin Thread Starter

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  3. Tanis

    Tanis

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    Yes, a 32bit OS can only address up to 4Gb of memory and some of that 4Gb is permanently allocated certain system processes, then it allocates to any video RAM you may have, anything that is left will be used by your actual system RAM. So typically, a 32bit OS will only be able to use around 3Gb of system RAM.

    Do you only have the Windows installation that was pre-installed on your old HP machine hard drive? Installing a new motherboard can often cause problems if you don't do a fresh, clean install of Windows (not always, but often :) ). If you only have a PC manufacturers install disk then there is a good chance it won't work on another machine and legally, you shouldn't be using it on anything but the original machine.


    The Antec 300 is a pretty decent case, I have used pretty low cost CoolerMaster cases in the past aswell and found them to be fairly good.

    CoolerMaster Cases

    I used a Elite 340 I think it was on my old system and that was fairly nice and I didnt have any heat problems.

    I am not really familiar with this make of PSU but just ensure you don't go cheap on that component :). Personally I usually go for Corsair, PC Power and Cooling or OCZ units. Plan ahead, if you are planning to upgrade then make sure you get a unit that is well above what your system needs now. Look to run the PSU at about 70-80% of its capability when the PC is under load, this should ensure the supply lasts a long time :)
     
  4. dustyjay

    dustyjay

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    Jay
    I have two of the Antec 300 cases and an totally pleased with them. Airflow is great and layout is good. Cable managment is good as well. I too would go with a better brand power supply. You will not be able to use the preinstalled Vista from the HP. It is customized for the HP Hardware, and as stated as an OEM Operating System it must die with the Original Motherboard.
     
  5. hamdanglin

    hamdanglin Thread Starter

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    True, I chose that power supply because of the price. There were other cheap ones but this one is Crossfire and SLI certified as well as being a PLUS Silver unit. There where a lot of reviews stating it had plenty of stable power. Most that had anything to say about were really satisfied with it. The retail was $150 but marked at $100 with a $20 promo code from Newegg.com...the newer ad states it is a 1080 watt continuous supply but the box says 800 and 1080max output which is about 250 watts more than my setup.

    In regards to the OS, if I managed to locate windows 7 would it come with everything I need to load it? And what would I need to do with my HDDs so that it the old Vista wouldn't affect the installation. Would I be better with a new HDD and retrieve what data I had previously after the windows 7 installation? Or is there something that I can do with my old HDD aside from wiping all that data? I want this to be a positive experience and the smoother the better. Also what are the newest versions of w7? I guess if I am going to do this I need to come fill circle.
    Thanks again for your advice guys!
     
  6. hamdanglin

    hamdanglin Thread Starter

    Joined:
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    True, I chose that power supply because of the price. There were other cheap ones but this one is Crossfire and SLI certified as well as being a PLUS Silver unit. There where a lot of reviews stating it had plenty of stable power. Most that had anything to say about were really satisfied with it. The retail was $150 but marked at $100 with a $20 promo code from Newegg.com...the newer ad states it is a 1080 watt continuous supply but the box says 800 and 1080max output which is about 250 watts more than my setup.

    In regards to the OS, if I managed to locate windows 7 would it come with everything I need to load it? And what would I need to do with my HDDs so that it the old Vista wouldn't affect the installation. Would I be better with a new HDD and retrieve what data I had previously after the windows 7 installation? Or is there something that I can do with my old HDD aside from wiping all that data? I want this to be a positive experience and the smoother the better. Also what are the newest versions of w7? I guess if I am going to do this I need to come fill circle.
    Thanks again for your advice guys!
     
  7. Tanis

    Tanis

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    Windows 7 should be pretty easy to get hold of now and I don't think it is too excessive on price, I would go for a Home Premium version rather than Basic personally and if you are going to update go for a 64bit version for future proofing and access to more RAM (64bit OS doesn't have the 3/4Gb RAM limit that 32bit does).

    You shouldn't need to replace the hard drive if there is nothing wrong with the one you have. The best option is probably to back up any data you want from the old drive, either onto an external drive or DVD, something like that. Then format and install Windows 7 (it will do all this if you boot from a new Windows 7 CD/DVD).

    Once Windows 7 is up and running, just put all your backed up data back onto the drive, job done.
     
  8. dustyjay

    dustyjay

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    If you have more than one hdd, pick the one you want the os to be on, and install that one when you build the computer. As Tanis said if you have files you want to keep on it, copy those to another external or to DVDs before hand. Then start the computer with the Win 7 disc in the optical drive (make sure the the optical drive is listed first in boot priority in bios) then let the Win 7 installation take care of partitioning and formatting for you. Win 7 installation takes about 1/4 the time to install that Win XP did. As suggested I would recommend Win 7 Home Premium at a minimum. I would not go above Win 7 Professional mainly because of the price difference.
     
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