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Ford in trouble ?

Discussion in 'Random Discussion' started by telecom69, Jan 24, 2006.

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  1. telecom69

    telecom69 Gone but never forgotten Thread Starter

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    News is just starting to filter in here in the UK that all is not well with Ford the renowned car maker,seems impossible to believe that they can be in trouble....this country (UK) is full of them,greatly outnumbering any other cars,personally I love them,have always had one,was wondering how they are viewed in America? and what will be the impact with them taking drastic measures in cutting down on so many things ...

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4297305.stm

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/4639034.stm
     
  2. Omega_Shadow

    Omega_Shadow

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    I live in Detroit, the Motor City Capital of the world and home of Ford Headquarters. Here, there is an air of restrained panic.

    Most of the economy here is centered around Ford and its Wixom plant. With it closing, there are fears that the economy will fold in on itself in a cascade effect that will devastate the aria.

    I am not too worried cause life goes on. But others are deeply concerned.
     
  3. chris_knows

    chris_knows

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    I live in Windsor, about 5 minutes from Detroit, and we're affected pretty strongly;

    Something like 25% employess fired, and 4,000 executives...But then again, I heard that Honda is moving over to here, so there's going to be some new jobs opening...

    Actually, it's both Ford and GM...They are finally seeing the problems with the money saving years of the 1970s and '80s, when they got into huge union contract issues, and decided to save money by skimping on the products. And then having to spend MORE money fixing the products after the fact. Jaques Nasser at Ford was one of the worst, and one of the reasons Bill Ford replaced him a few years back (and Nasser's penny pinching was the reason the first Focus was so plagued by recalls). But the beancounter mentality at Ford and GM are still firmly in place and will be hard to get rid of. Closing plants is not the way to solve the problem, as once again, it sacrifices product....

    Just my 2 cents though...
     
  4. poochee

    poochee

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    Yep, I had my go-around with the Ford Company. I bought one of their defective cars, but I won the battle. I got back the money I had to spend on it. Henry Ford must be turning over in his grave because of what has happened to his company. I'm sticking with Toyota (built in Japan).

    chiris_knows, I was born in Detroit and I remember going to Ontario to shop! It was fun. I left when I was 13. We moved to St Joseph, MI.
     
  5. bkdc

    bkdc

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    Fix Or Repair Daily
     
  6. Guyzer

    Guyzer

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    The domestic car makers had it in the bag for years by being the only game in town. They could build inferior products and get away with it until the Japanese came. Even with that they remained a big player for quite a few years but missed something big. The North American buyers wanted a better and longer lasting car which is something the imports picked up on leaving the domestics in the dust. Chrysler had it's financial troubles in the late '70s and early '80s and even with that they still haven't matched the longevity of the imports since then. Ford and GM I guess need a good spanking and that's what's about to happen. I have bought a new vehicle about every 2 - 3 years since 1981 and with the exception of 3 they have been either
    GM / Chev trucks or my last one which is a '03 Intrepid. The three others were Nissans. The number of warranty claims on the domestics, none major just annoyances, is staggering when put up against the Nissans. I had two claims in many years of driving, both minor issues. I'm also now in the car business, ( sales and prev. service ) and see a lot of vehicles come and go and based on what I see and know will not be buying another domestic...ever.
    The bottom line in my opinion is " build it better, make it last longer with fewer repairs and they will buy it". The manufacturers have no one to blame but themselves.
     
  7. Omega_Shadow

    Omega_Shadow

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    bkdc, good, but I got one better:
    Found On Road Dead, Driver Returned On Foot
     
  8. Guyzer

    Guyzer

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    GM......... body by Fisher, rest by luck.
     
  9. Gibble

    Gibble

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    I find that odd, my father is a mechanic, he sees what comes into the shop. And he'll admit that the imports make long lasting cars. But, when they start to break...that's it, sell the car and buy a new one. Because they are expensive to fix, and once they start breaking, they don't seem to stop breaking. Add to that, in our climate up here, the cars body is subjected to alot of sand, water, etc, and they tend to rust faster than domestics.

    The domestic may break more often, but it's ussually cheaper to fix and maintain in the logn run. At least that's my experience, and why I've always bought domestic cars. When they break, I rarely spend more than $100 to fix them.

    Having said all that, you can get around all the problems with any manufacturers cars simply by maintaining your car properly. The body won't rust if you keep it CLEAN and that includes the undercarraige...I find it amazing, how many people I see with a shiny car, yet you see the ice and slush all over the bottom of their car when they leave the car wash.
    Also, put in synthetic oil, and change it every 5000km, your car starts easier, especially in the cold, and it doesn't break down as fast as regular oil, which means when you change it, the oil you're removing isn't completely burnt out, and your car wasn't subjected to unnecessary wear and tear. Find a mechanic you trust, and when he says, you should replace part X because it's weak, and that you should replace part Y and part Z at the same time, DO IT! There's a reason for it. Yes, parts Y and Z might be functioning fine at the moment, but they are old, they rely on part X and part X relies on them...by not replacing them part X won't last as long as it should, and it will cost you more when all three wear out faster than they should have...

    There's nothing more that my dad hates than when he says replace this and this. The person complains "I only have $500 not $700 so what can you fix so that it 'works for now'?"...ugh then two months later, they complain because they have another $500 bill to replace what he said should have been replaced last time and want warranty because it's the same problem they brought it in for two months ago :mad:

    Take proper care of your car and it will LAST as long as you own it.

    /steps off soapbox
     
  10. bill.aam

    bill.aam

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    First On Race Day
     
  11. Guyzer

    Guyzer

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    All good points Gibbs and I do believe in proper maintence. It really boils down to personal experience.
    As you know I lived in your area for 10 years and just moved to the coast. The climate is different and that will also effect cars greatly. Being milder here I guess is one big reason why there are more imports vs domestics. It's hard to keep a car's interior warm when it's minus a gazillion degrees. ( been following the weather there. Looks like you are getting a big break this year)
     
  12. Gibble

    Gibble

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    Yep, a HUGE break!!! Tomorrow it's supposed to go up to +1...it's about time this global warming thing kicked in :p

    The other thing I liked about my 80's domestics, they always started...-40C not plugged in, *vroom*...the import beside me...plugged in...*rrr, rrr, rrr, click, click* :D
     
  13. coderitr

    coderitr

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    My problem is with engineered obsolescence. Case in point, the timing belt. It used to be a chain. Now that it's a rubber belt designed with a fixed life expectancy, I have to replace it. If and when the timing chain broke, you replaced it with no more parts and labor than it takes to replace the timing belt as part of "routine maintenance." I have a big problem taking my car to the dealer and paying what amounts to an extra car payment that month for them to tune it up, hand the keys back to me and say there's nothing wrong with it now when there wasn't anything wrong with it to begin with. I think my next car will be a 1978 Buick. At least I could work on the thing. At least I could find the <CWLMST> spark plugs and the battery was under the hood instead of in the fender ala my last car; a 1998 Dodge Stratus.

    Now I drive a 2001 VW for which I have to pay higher gas prices because of the requirement to use premium. Most people I talk to say there isn't any difference but for the first six months that I had the car, I didn't realize it needed premium gasoline so I put regular in it. Two and a half years later, the stupid thing still sounds terrible. Also, I had to replace a tail light because it had a hole in it that the NC inspection wouldn't pass (they did the year before.) $120 for the tail light and $80 for them to install it. There is a problem with a design that requires a mechanic to disassemble the quarter-panel to replace a <CWLMST> tail light!!!!! I asked them how I could have done it myself and they told me there were six bolts that had to be removed to remove the trim panel from the rear of the car. I've searched high and low and I can only find four. That is a a problem. The requirement of having specialized tools to change the spark plugs is a problem. Not being able to FIND the spark plugs when I open the hood is a problem.

    [/rant]
     
  14. coderitr

    coderitr

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    Yeah, well, maybe now the UAW will realize they caused the problem to begin with.
     
  15. Gibble

    Gibble

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    Try changing the plugs on an '86 Calais :rolleyes: you either have to remove the intake, OR you can loosen the engine mounts and try and shift it enough to get at them...

    The problems have been around for ages. But if you want gas mileage, that means smaller, lighter cars, meaning the parts get crammed in.

    As for the timing chain vs timing belt argument, a belt drive can increase power over a timing chain through less frictional loss, more precise timing, smoother valvetrain motion and eliminating windage caused by the timing chain and gears running in oil. A belt drive also isolates the crankshaft's torsional vibrations from the camshaft better than a chain (and certainly better than gear drives, which can amplify crank harmonics).
     
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