1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

getting a new PC case

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by CoasterFreak, May 6, 2004.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. CoasterFreak

    CoasterFreak Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    Messages:
    2,330
    First Name:
    Everett
    Ok, I have a HP Pavilion 325c PC. Im getting a new PC case for it (doing a little modding..making it look kool :D ) Anyway, HP told me that the motherboard was definately compatible, but they said that the power supply inside the new case might not work (they weren't sure) Anyway, the power supply inside the new case is 400 Watts, while the power supply inside my current case is 200 Watts. So I don't have to call staples (they told me to call my nearest HP Reseller), can anyone on here tell me whether or not I can hook up a motherboard that was previously on a 200 Watt power supply to a 400 watt power supply. PLEASE HELP!..lol Thanx :)
     
  2. dustyjay

    dustyjay

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2003
    Messages:
    12,661
    First Name:
    Jay
    THe reason they told you the power supply might not work is because the motherboard may take a proprietary power supply. In other words one designed by HP to work on that motherboard. This is just one of the reasons for not buying big box computers. You need a power supply that has the same pin out on the atx plug as the HP unit.
     
  3. CoasterFreak

    CoasterFreak Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    Messages:
    2,330
    First Name:
    Everett
    is there even a small chance that a 400 WATT PS would work with my mobo? I mean, I thought all ATX mobo's could take the same PS.
     
  4. alwrmc

    alwrmc

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2004
    Messages:
    1,163
    First Name:
    B.L.
    There is a very good chance that the PS will work with that motherboard. Give it a try. Just be VERY CAREFULL about the connections going to the correct pins. The connectors to the MB, the drives (HD and DVD/CD's) and the floppy are all pretty much standard. But the markings and things for the various ON/OFF, Reset etc can be very small and difficult to read and to get the polarity correct.
     
  5. CoasterFreak

    CoasterFreak Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    Messages:
    2,330
    First Name:
    Everett
    Ok thanx. I just wanted to make sure before I order the case. Because I am not buying it from a store (i'm buying it from tigerdirect.com) I just wanted to be absolutely positive. Well, thank you :)
     
  6. dustyjay

    dustyjay

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2003
    Messages:
    12,661
    First Name:
    Jay
    Actually alwrmc is mostly correct. You just have to make sure that the pins on the ATX connector are supplying the same voltages as the HP power supply. This is usually one of the ways companies like HP and Compaq (Oh they are the same company now) keep you buying their parts instead of using third party parts.
     
  7. CoasterFreak

    CoasterFreak Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    Messages:
    2,330
    First Name:
    Everett
    Well I just talked to an HP Tech Support Guy, he said I'm all good to go with the 400 WATT PS. He "ensured" me it would work properly. I'm going to assume that means that if it doesn't work or something burns out or blows up..i get some dough..lol (y) :)
     
  8. Shuzzy

    Shuzzy

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2004
    Messages:
    13
    Another option for you would be to buy a case without a power supply and just put your existing power supply into the case you buy. Although 200 watt psu is getting outdated with all the new hardware.
     
  9. StillLearnin'

    StillLearnin'

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2001
    Messages:
    1,742
    "Well I just talked to an HP Tech Support Guy, he said I'm all good to go with the 400 WATT PS. He "ensured" me it would work properly."

    I'd get his name, address, social security number, bank acount number and then have an attorney present to get it in writing and then signed by all the people above this tech(his supervisor, etc., all the way to the director of payroll, CEO, etc.), then I'd have them PRE-WRITE a check to me for $1500 so I could cash it first and then I would "assure" them that if the 400w power supply worked okay that I would "gladly" refund their money advancement they gave me! It's not hot in the middle of Death Valley in mid-summer either.......................
     
  10. dustyjay

    dustyjay

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2003
    Messages:
    12,661
    First Name:
    Jay
    I am not convinced that the tech you talked to at HP (a person usually outsourced to India or Bangladesh or some such place) who is probably lost with out a script to read from, really knows all. I would really do some checking, like maybe taking the existing power supply to a reputable mom and pop computer shop and have them check it against a standard atx power supply to make sure that you can get away with it. Sorry I just do not trust HP/Compaq anymore. Nor Dell tech support for that matter.
     
  11. CoasterFreak

    CoasterFreak Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    Messages:
    2,330
    First Name:
    Everett
    Yea I'm going to this little mom and pop shop 2morrow to buy a used burner so i'll take my current P/S with me too.
     
  12. CoasterFreak

    CoasterFreak Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    Messages:
    2,330
    First Name:
    Everett
    sry to double post....but to ask..how can I check it myself. I have another PC downstairs and I want to assume that it is an ATX case, I built it myself maybe 4 years ago. Should I check it by making sure all the wires go into the same places on both connectors? Thanks
     
  13. dustyjay

    dustyjay

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2003
    Messages:
    12,661
    First Name:
    Jay
    That would be a start. Easy way to tell if it is an ATX case but not absolutely is the holes for the Keyboard and mouse. AT motherboards did not as a rule use PS2 connectors.
     
  14. CoasterFreak

    CoasterFreak Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    Messages:
    2,330
    First Name:
    Everett
    wut are the different type of cases...I know of AT and ATX and mini-atx or sumtin like that...but I know that there are some more...but I dont know their names.

    Hey also, thanx for the info on the AT and ATX case. I never knew looking at the keyboard/mouse holes would tell you. What are some other ways to know. Thanx.
     
  15. dustyjay

    dustyjay

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2003
    Messages:
    12,661
    First Name:
    Jay
    well as far as identifying the case/powersupply The AT power supply has a mechanical switch to power it up. Instead the ATX uses a signal through the motherboard to start up. The connector on an AT is a 2 part connector that plugs into a socket side by side with I think a total of like 12 pins. ATX plug is a 20 pin one piece plug. As far as different types of Mobos, atx, mini atx are the same as far as cases go. There are others such as BATX and such but they are not really that common now. You might find them for those small footprint systems and media center pc's. Another point in identifying an at motherboard is they do not have a mouse port. The mouse was connected to the serial port or a special card called a bus mous card (really hard to find).
     
  16. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/227285

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice