Good Ideas!

ekim68

Mike
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
57,532

Bioplastic made from wood powder entirely degrades in three months


Motivated by our growing problem with plastics, which are environmentally damaging both to produce and after they're disposed of, scientists are tinkering away with more eco-friendly forms of the material. Researchers at Yale University have put forward a candidate that ticks a number of important boxes, developing a new bioplastic with high strength but an ability to degrade entirely in the space of three months.

The pursuit of more environmentally friendly bioplastics has seen scientists turn to all sorts of biomass as their starting point. These possibilities include egg shells, plants and even tequila waste, and all invariably raise the prospect of a material that is not only greener to produce, but doesn't take centuries to break down like conventional petroleum-based plastics do.
 

ekim68

Mike
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
57,532

How to Remove Stains From a Butcher Block Countertop


Butcher blocks are large, thick pieces of wood ideally suited for meat preparation. Over time they’ve also become a popular choice for kitchen countertops, as their natural look and durability for food preparation make them an aesthetically pleasing and functional choice.

But their upkeep does take a bit of work in terms of cleaning and oil treatments, and getting a stain on your butcher block is the stuff of nightmares—the wood has a tendency to soak up moisture no matter how much you prep it.
 

ekim68

Mike
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
57,532

Whitest-ever paint could help cool heating Earth, study shows


The whitest-ever paint has been produced by academic researchers, with the aim of boosting the cooling of buildings and tackling the climate crisis.

The new paint reflects 98% of sunlight as well as radiating infrared heat through the atmosphere into space. In tests, it cooled surfaces by 4.5C below the ambient temperature, even in strong sunlight. The researchers said the paint could be on the market in one or two years.
 

ekim68

Mike
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
57,532
Orbital launches O2, the "most powerful tidal turbine in the world"

Scotland's Orbital Marine Power (formerly Scotrenewables) has completed the build on what it claims will be the world's most powerful operational tidal turbine. It's now on its way to the Orkney Islands, where it'll have a chance to prove its worth connected to the grid.

Solar energy is a key part of the energy mix that'll push us towards zero carbon emissions – but lunar energy might have a role to play too. As the moon's gravity pulls at the Earth's surface, it heaves vast quantities of ocean water around the globe in predictable patterns. Where this water is forced through narrow gaps or around headlands, it speeds up, and it's possible to harvest the kinetic energy of that mass of water using turbines under the ocean's surface. This is called tidal power.
 

ekim68

Mike
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
57,532

World-first imaging probe searches for cancer with lasers and sound


Scientists at the University of Nottingham have developed a first-of-its-kind imaging sensor designed to be deployed inside the human body to build 3D maps of cellular structures. The prototype device, which combines lasers and sound waves in an optical fiber no thicker than a human hair, could be used in conjunction with standard endoscopes to reveal abnormalities in cells indicative of cancer.
 

ekim68

Mike
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
57,532

Reversible fabric heats on one side, cools on the other


It can be frustrating, when the jacket that you initially put on to keep you warm starts making you too hot. Jackets made from an experimental new reversible fabric, however, could both heat and cool their wearer.

Developed by scientists from China's Zhejiang University and Westlake University, the multi-layered "Janus textile" consists of a base of ePTFE (expanded polytetrafluoroethylene) polymer fibers. Other substances have been bonded to those fibers, giving the fabric one side that warms the user, and one that helps keep them cool.

 

ekim68

Mike
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
57,532

Light-shrinking material lets ordinary microscope see in super resolution


Electrical engineers at the University of California San Diego developed a technology that improves the resolution of an ordinary light microscope so that it can be used to directly observe finer structures and details in living cells.

The technology turns a conventional light microscope into what's called a super-resolution microscope. It involves a specially engineered material that shortens the wavelength of light as it illuminates the sample—this shrunken light is what essentially enables the microscope to image in higher resolution.
 

ekim68

Mike
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
57,532

A 'Bubble Barrier' is trapping plastic waste before it can get into the sea


What do old televisions, street signs, motorbike helmets, windsurf boards, and Christmas trees have in common? They were all caught floating down Amsterdam's Westerdok canal -- by a curtain of bubbles.

"The Bubble Barrier" was developed as a simple way to stop plastic pollution flowing from waterways into the ocean. An air compressor sends air through a perforated tube running diagonally across the bottom of the canal, creating a stream of bubbles that traps waste and guides it to a catchment system.
 

ekim68

Mike
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
57,532

ekim68

Mike
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
57,532

"Vegan spider silk" offers a plant-based replacement for common plastic


By mimicking the self-assembling microstructures that give spider silk its incredible strength, scientists at the University of Cambridge have produced a plant-based film with the strength of common single-use plastics, offering a "vegan" eco-friendly alternative to the material. The free-standing film can be colored and scaled up for industrial use, and then easily composted once its job is done.
 

ekim68

Mike
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
57,532

Self-healing concrete eats CO2 to fill its own cracks in 24 hours


Concrete has a massive carbon footprint, so technologies that boost its performance and enable it to last longer could have profound benefits for the environment. This has led to the development of self-healing concrete that can repair its own cracks, and scientists have now demonstrated an exciting new form of this that makes use of an enzyme found in human blood.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 807,865 other people just like you!

Latest posts

Members online

Top