Good Ideas!

ekim68

Mike
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Ground-breaking night-vision film can be applied to regular glasses


Scientists at the Australian National University (ANU) have developed a new type of night-vision technology that is the first of its kind. Taking the form of an ultra-thin film, it can be applied directly to glasses to act as a filter, needing only a simple laser to convert infrared light into images the wearer can see.

The researchers' groundbreaking film is based on nanocrystal technology that they've been working on for a number of years. These tiny particles are hundreds of times thinner than a human hair, and work by converting incoming photons from infrared light into higher-energy photons on the visible spectrum.

 

ekim68

Mike
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Engineer Builds Self-Balancing Autonomous Bicycle in Spare Time


Tired of having to worry about falling off his bicycle, a cunning hardware engineer called Zhi Hui Jun built a bicycle that avoids obstacles and self-balances, a report by Gizmodo explains.

The engineer, who worked on the bicycle project in his spare time over the course of four months, crafted a self-balancing bicycle using an accelerometer and gyroscope sensors that allow the bike's front wheel to compensate and quickly change direction if it's going to fall.

The system generates just the right amount of angular momentum in the right direction to stop the bike from falling.
 

ekim68

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Lego reveals first ever bricks made from recycled plastic bottles


Over past few years, Lego has been taking some steps toward more sustainable practices for its plastic toys, outlining plans for more eco-friendly playthings. The company has just revealed the first prototype of its classic brick element crafted from recycled plastic sourced from discarded bottles that meets the company's quality and safety requirements.
 

ekim68

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Instant water disinfectant 'millions of times more effective' than commercial purification


July 1 (UPI) -- The creators of a new instant water disinfectant, made using only hydrogen and the surrounding air, claim their invention is "millions of times more effective" at ridding water of viruses and bacteria than commercial purification methods.

In addition to revolutionizing municipal water cleaning, the inventors of the novel technique suggest their disinfectant can help safely and cheaply deliver potable water to communities in need.
 

ekim68

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Novel plastic disintegrates in a week in sunlight and oxygen


By making alterations to the plastic manufacturing process, scientists hope to produce forms of the ubiquitous material that can break down far more safely and quickly in the environment than current versions do. Researchers in China have now demonstrated a new example of this that degrades in just a week when exposed to sunlight and oxygen, which they believe could make for electronics that are easier to dispose of at the end of their lives.
 

ekim68

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More on plastics...


Five forms of eco-friendly plastic that break down fast


The battle against plastic pollution is one being fought on many fronts, but a particularly critical one centers on the material's capacity to persist in the environment for a long time, even centuries in some cases.
By tweaking the process by which plastic is made, scientists hope to offer functional forms of it that safely and naturally degrade in just a fraction of the time. And recent breakthroughs suggest such a future mightn't be all that far away.
 

ekim68

Mike
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More Water news:


MIT steam collector captures pure water for reuse in power plants


Nuclear and fossil fuel power plants consume huge amounts of water for cooling, which then goes to waste as water vapor. MIT engineers have now developed a system that can capture and recycle that lost water.

Big plumes of white steam are a common sight around power plants, but while it’s somewhat a relief to know it’s not carbon dioxide or, worse, greenhouse gases, they do represent how much water is being consumed.

 

ekim68

Mike
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Inflatable robotic hand gives amputees real-time tactile control


For the more than 5 million people in the world who have undergone an upper-limb amputation, prosthetics have come a long way. Beyond traditional mannequin-like appendages, there is a growing number of commercial neuroprosthetics — highly articulated bionic limbs, engineered to sense a user’s residual muscle signals and robotically mimic their intended motions.
 
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Lots of good ideas posted.
I agree.

One idea I was taught was to take leftover soap slivers, put them inside an old piece of lady's pantyhose, and tie the pantyhose shut. Then you can continue using up the remaining soap and it cannot get away from you so easily.
 
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ekim68

Mike
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Wearable device detects a wider-than-ever range of airborne toxins


While wearable sensors can detect airborne toxins in the user's environment, any one device can usually only identify a few such substances. A potentially much more useful new sensor, however, can reportedly detect over 100 at once.

Developed by Oklahoma State University-affiliated startup Airotect, the XCel+ Dosimeter Badge is roughly the size and shape of a credit card, and is clipped to the wearer's shirt or jacket not unlike a security pass. Plans call for future versions to take the form of a pen-like device that's placed in a shirt pocket, or a fabric patch that's stitched onto clothing.
 

ekim68

Mike
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57,910

Carbon nanotube thread turns regular shirts into heart rate monitors


Over the years, we've seen many examples of smart garments packed with technology to monitor different aspects of a wearer's physical wellbeing, but lately we're seeing how very fine, conductive fibers could make for a more seamless experience. Rice University researchers have applied this thinking to a "smart" shirt that uses interwoven carbon nanotube fibers to provide steady electrical contact with the skin, allowing for ongoing gathering of data on heart activity.
 

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