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Google Shares Anyone ?

Discussion in 'Random Discussion' started by oldie, Apr 25, 2004.

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  1. oldie

    oldie Thread Starter

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    Anyone anticipating obtaining shares in Google? Rumoured to be going public in the next few days (y)

    Only six years old and reputed to be worth $20 billion :eek:

    Oldie
     
  2. ~Candy~

    ~Candy~ Retired Administrator

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    Google Set to Announce IPO Plans Within Days

    Dow Jones Friday, April 23, 2004 at 04:07


    SAN FRANCISCO -- Internet-search pioneer Google Inc. plans to announce within days that it will push forward with an initial public offering, people familiar with the matter told The Wall Street Journal.


    The announcement is linked to the fact that Google will soon be required to disclose publicly more information about its business, under a Securities and Exchange Commission rule triggered after closely held companies surpass a certain size. Google is expected to have to make such disclosures as early as next week. Lawyers have said that the disclosure requirements can be a trigger for companies to list their shares.


    Major elements of Google's expected offering remain unknown, including its size, which banks have been tapped to lead it, and the extent to which individual investors will be able to participate. A Google spokeswoman declined to comment.


    Rumors around the Mountain View, Calif., company's IPO have swirled through markets since October. Based on early chatter among bankers, the offering could value Google at as much as $25 billion, and spread nearly $100 million in fees across Wall Street. Last fall, some of Google's prospective advisers estimated the valuation of the company could be in line with other Internet leaders. Those include Yahoo Inc. (YHOO), valued at $38 billion, Amazon.com Inc. (AMZN) at $20 billion and eBay Inc. (EBAY) at $54 billion.


    Wall Street Journal Staff Reporters Kevin J. Delaney, Mylene Mangalindan and Robin Sidel contributed to this article.



    (END) Dow Jones Newswires


    04-23-04 0407ET
     
  3. GoneForNow

    GoneForNow

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    No comment. :D ;)
     
  4. sleekluxury

    sleekluxury

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    $20 Billion...whoa....sweet.
     
  5. dannyboyfx

    dannyboyfx

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    hope it dosent lose it usefulness. i kinda like using goodle, hope it dosent go down the drain
     
  6. cnelson04

    cnelson04

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    I don't think i'll be buying any. I don't know, but..Just does not seam like it would be worth it, i mean..ahh who knows..:)
     
  7. ~Candy~

    ~Candy~ Retired Administrator

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    Google taps CSFB, Morgan Stanley

    By CBS MarketWatch
    Last Update: 4:19 PM ET April 26, 2004


    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS.MW) -- Credit Suisse First Boston and Morgan Stanley will lead the highly anticipated Google initial public offering likely to be announced this week, which could generate fees of up to $100 million, according to people familiar with Google's IPO plans.



    CSFB, the securities unit of Zurich's Credit Suisse Group (CSR: news, chart, profile), and Morgan Stanley (MWD: news, chart, profile) have long been considered top contenders for the Google IPO.

    Most observers agree that Google could be the biggest dot-com IPO ever, with anticipated proceeds of up to $2 billion or more and an opening market cap of $15 billion or so.

    But much depends on the pricing of the IPO and on whether Google's price-to-earnings ratio appeals to value-oriented investors seasoned by the lessons of the dot-com bubble. Discuss Google and its IPO prospects.

    According to Google's Web site, the company employs more than 1,000 people and offers stock options as a benefit to all new hires. It also says the company is profitable, offering no specifics.

    The real winners in the IPO will be founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page, who may pocket as much as $1 billion. The two were recently featured in Forbes as among the youngest billionaires in the world.

    Besides its employees, Google also has a long line of institutional investors, such as marquee venture-capital firms Kleiner Perkins and Sequoia Capital, along with Sun Microsystems co-founder Andy Bechtolsheim, entrepreneur Ram Shriram and others. The first two put in $25 million each back in 1999.

    Google, based in Mountain View, Calif., is the most-used site in the world for Web searches, logging more than 200 million searches a day. Google licenses its technology to scores of companies, including America Online and Yahoo. It also operates a news-aggregation service as well as a shopping search function called Froogle.

    Advertising revenues rising

    The likely Google IPO comes at a time when advertising revenue at Internet companies is near its highest level since 2000.

    The growth of classified ads and rich-media advertising drove Internet advertising dollars to $7.3 billion last year.

    Fourth-quarter Internet advertising sales were a record-setting $2.2 billion, according to the Internet Advertising Bureau and PricewaterhouseCoopers. For the full year, the overall industry grew nearly 21 percent.

    The annual Net advertising figure also eclipsed the $7.1 billion generated in 2001. But it has yet to surpass the $8.08 billion generated in Net advertising back in 2000.

    Google's piece of that pie is an unknown, but it won't be for long -- whether the company decides to file for an IPO or not.

    Despite its months-long coyness about an IPO filing, the company may soon have to reveal its closely guarded financial performance through another type of public filing, according to securities lawyers tracking the company. See full story.

    Under securities law, U.S. companies that have $10 million in total assets and more than 500 stockholders must file a Form 10 with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

    Such a filing would force Google to report its earnings and revenue information. It would also trigger a need for other public filings, such as proxy statements and annual reports.

    Fees

    The Google IPO would give an immediate jolt to the IPO market. It would also mean as much as $100 million in fees for underwriters, with the lion's share going to leads CSFB, led by Bill Brady and George Boutros, and Morgan Stanley.

    Since 1995, the average fee paid to investment banks underwriting a deal has ranged between 1.27 percent of the deal value -- on the Credit Lyonnais IPO in 1999 -- to 4 percent for IPOs of CIT Group (CIT: news, chart, profile), Travelers Property & Casualty (TAP.A: news, chart, profile) and Charter Communications (CHTR: news, chart, profile), according to Dealogic.

    A $2 billion IPO would also rank among the top 20 U.S. IPOs since 1995, but it would likely not exceed the $10.6 billion offering by AT&T Wireless Services (AWE: news, chart, profile) in 2000 that stands as the biggest in the last decade.
     
  8. ~Candy~

    ~Candy~ Retired Administrator

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    2:08pm 04/29/04
    Google files for $2.7 billion IPO By Greg Morcroft
    NEW YORK (CBS.MW) -- Google, the popular Internet search engine company, on Thursday filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to make a much anticipated initial public offering worth about $2.7 billion. The lead managers for the offering will be Credit Suisse First Boston and Morgan Stanley.
     
  9. deuce

    deuce

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    They're finally having the IPO that I had wished they had YEARS ago. :rolleyes: Oh well. ;)
     
  10. cnelson04

    cnelson04

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    Might be hard for the average stock holder to get a hold of..grr..makes me mad, i'm only 14, doubt i'll be able to get any of it IPO="Big Companys"
     
  11. deuce

    deuce

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    It's not really different than any other IPO.......Yahoo finance: "Google did not provide details on the pricing or expected listing date for its shares, but said they would be sold through an auction designed to even the playing field for smaller investors and "minimize" the "boom-bust cycles" that have characterized other IPOs."

    :rolleyes: ;)
     
  12. ~Candy~

    ~Candy~ Retired Administrator

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    An auction to even the playing field? :eek: You gotta be kidding me, we're talking tulip mania here. I called Schwab, they said more than likely they wouldn't be getting any, but things could change. I'll hold my breath ;)
     
  13. oldie

    oldie Thread Starter

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    Wot on earth is a bloody auction, when a company goes public :( An American thing :confused:

    Oldie
     
  14. ~Candy~

    ~Candy~ Retired Administrator

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    Google has set the long-awaited price range for its initial public offering, putting itself in line to raise as much as $3.3 billion, according to a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday.
    The search giant set a price range of $108 to $135 a share, according to the filing. Based on those per-share numbers and the expected issuance of 24.6 million shares, the search giant hopes to raise between $2.7 billion and $3.3 billion. That would make it among the largest-ever IPOs.

    The company plans to list its shares under the ticker GOOG, according to the filing. Google has already registered to trade on the Nasdaq exchange. No date has been set yet for the IPO.

    If Google begins trading at $135 a share, it would have a market capitalization of $36.3 billion, according to its SEC filing. That would put it in range with Yahoo, which had a market cap of $37.8 billion in early-morning trading Monday, but far short of Microsoft's $308 billion.

    After its IPO, Google expects to have 268.5 million shares outstanding, largely consisting of its series B shares.

    After a long, listless period following the dot-com downturn that began in 2000, the market for tech IPOs has been heating up recently. Google's planned venture into public trading has been one of the most anticipated of the bunch.

    Other prominent IPOs include the market debut of software specialist Salesforce.com, which saw a quick run-up in its first hours of trading but has since settled down to about 20 percent above its initial price of $11 per share.

    In Monday's SEC filing, Google also revealed recent financial results, a key step in preparing for the stock offering. During the six months ended June 30, Google posted revenue of $1.4 billion, up from $560 million in the same period a year ago.

    The company's net income jumped to $143 million in the six-month period, compared with $58 million a year earlier.

    The public offering is expected to take place via a Dutch auction, which means that investors will offer a bid price for the number of desired shares. The final IPO price will be based on the lowest bid price received that would result in the sale of all 24.6 million shares.

    The three-figure price range may not sit well with some potential investors, one analyst said.

    "This $108 to $135 price range is a very high share price to drop in the average investor's lap," said David Menlow, president of research firm IPO Financial Network. "Institutional investors--if they feel the offering is fairly valued--don't have a problem investing $200 a share in an IPO. But for the mom-and-pop investor, it's a psychological barrier to pay $108 to $135 to buy a share of stock."

    Menlow added, however, that it's unlikely that Google's IPO will sell for less than $100 a share.

    While other IPOs have topped Google's anticipated multibillion offering by presenting a larger number of shares, such as AT&T Wireless' $10 billion IPO in April 2000 and Kraft Foods' $8.7 billion offering in June 2001, the Internet company's range is the highest in recent history, Menlow noted.

    Previously, biotechnology giant Genentech had one of the highest IPO ranges, at $85 to $95 a share. Ultimately, Genentech priced its IPO at $97, Menlow said.

    Meanwhile, Google's general counsel is facing a potential civil injunction from the SEC regarding his former work at educational software applications maker SmartForce, where he served as chief financial officer, according to Google's SEC filing.

    David Drummond, who worked at SmartForce from July 1999 to February 2002, was notified by the SEC on Tuesday that its staff planned to recommend the agency bring a civil injunction against him for allegedly violating federal securities laws and antifraud provisions, according to the SEC filing. The issue centers on certain disclosure and accounting issues related to SmartForce's financial statements.

    Google noted that none of the allegations involve the search company and that Drummond was hired in February 2002.

    The Internet giant is also facing continuing attrition among its underwriters. In its most recent SEC filing, Google no longer lists RBC Capital Markets and SunTrust Robinson Humphrey among its underwriters. Google now has 28 underwriters, down from its initial 31.
     
  15. izme

    izme

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    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Web search company Google says it may have illegally issued shares potentially worth as much as $3.1 billion (1.7 billion pounds) after its planned IPO, and offered to buy them back for a fraction of that amount.

    The company said it sold 23.2 million shares to 1,105 current and former employees and consultants and granted an additional 5.6 million stock options to 301 people. The transactions took place between September 2001 and June 2004 and were not registered, as required by law, Google said.



    http://www.reuters.co.uk/newsArticle.jhtml?type=internetNews&storyID=5880502&section=news
     
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