1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

grinding fan

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by IngerasKurai, Nov 12, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. IngerasKurai

    IngerasKurai Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Messages:
    2
    I have a fatal1ty an8 sli motherboard and the smaller fan on it sometimes will make a grinding noise. it'll speed up, then come to a near halt(this is when it makes the grinding noise) and then speed back up and repeat the process. in the image below it's the orange fan near the bottom left. sometimes the fan works normally but usually it does this...should i be worried? the metal part of the fan is hot enough that i can barely touch it for a few seconds before i have to stop.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. _Nessa_

    _Nessa_

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2009
    Messages:
    55
    Mine is doing this too I found out it is recalled when my computer did an HP update - I'd check yours out too :)
     
  3. win2kpro

    win2kpro

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2005
    Messages:
    11,670
    A grinding noise in a fan generally indicates the fan bearing is worn. Just replace the fan.
     
  4. _Nessa_

    _Nessa_

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2009
    Messages:
    55
    There are free replacements for mine since it was a faulty part :) I can't remember the specifics of the graphic card information though :S.
     
  5. win2kpro

    win2kpro

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2005
    Messages:
    11,670
    The fan the poster is having problems with is not a graphics card fan, it's a chipset fan. I feel sure that he will not be able to get a replacement from the manufacturer since that is an Abit motherboard, and Abit merged with another company or was taken over by another company and stopped producing motherboards in 2008.

    The poster will most likely have to take the cooler apart, and just replace the fan.
     
  6. IngerasKurai

    IngerasKurai Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Messages:
    2
    i'm a bit confused but i'm guessing the cooler is the metal frame and i'd have to open that up to get at the fan inside. How would i find a fan that's of a similar make? or would it have serial numbers or some such i'd be able to search for?

    with this fan not working properly should i be worried about damage to the motherboard/chipset? should i even turn the computer on?
     
  7. win2kpro

    win2kpro

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2005
    Messages:
    11,670
    I can't tell from the picture very well, but it looks like you take the two screws I see out and the top may come off the cooler.

    These type coolers take a special type fan called a "bury frame" fan. Evercool makes many of the "bury frame" fans used in chipset coolers and video card coolers.

    You have to remove the top of the cooler, and rotate the blades around and you will see 3 "spoke" type arms on the base of the fan with a very tiny screw that secures them to the cooler heatsink. You need a very small Phillips screwdriver with a 0 or 00 point to remove the screws. The screwdriver should be magnetic so it holds the screw as you remove it. Have a magnet or pan or some other object nearby to put the screws in when you remove them, because as I said they are very tiny, and if you drop one, you'll have a problem finding it.

    After all the screws are removed the fan should lift out of the heatsink after you unplug the wire that supplies current to the fan. There will most likely be a sticker on the fan giving a part number. As I previously stated most are made by Evercool and the size is most likely 50mm or 60mm x 10mm, but the size may be different. After you determine the exact size you can search for a replacement fan. You might also search for a complete replacement cooler, however exact cooler replacements are sometimes hard to find.

    If you remove the fan or cooler, don't operate the computer with the item removed or the chipset will overheat and shut down the machine.
     
  8. omgtehpwn

    omgtehpwn

    Joined:
    May 16, 2006
    Messages:
    79
    How critical is a chipset fan anyway? Every chipset fan that I've seen go out,I just unplug it with no ill effects at all.Leads me to believe that the chipset heatsink alone does the job ok, even if its boiling hot to the touch.
     
  9. win2kpro

    win2kpro

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2005
    Messages:
    11,670
    Chipset fans are generally used on heatsinks where a larger heatsink could not be installed without interferring with other board components.

    If you had room enough, and good enough chassis airflow to cool a passive heatsink you would not need a heatsink fan.

    The chipset is the "heart" of the motherboard. Chipsets have temperature limits just like processors have temperature limits. If a chipset goes above its maximum designed temperature it can at the least cause erratic operation of the machine, and at most destroy itself rendering the board useless.
     
  10. omgtehpwn

    omgtehpwn

    Joined:
    May 16, 2006
    Messages:
    79
    I see.How high of a temperature threshold can chipsets handle compared to CPU's and GPU's?
     
  11. replay

    replay

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2003
    Messages:
    5,402
    i have taken may of these chipset fans off motherboards..... if u give the fan a good clean, peel back the sticker and insert a little "lube" chances are they will work fine..... but very cheap to replace if that doesn't workout
     
  12. win2kpro

    win2kpro

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2005
    Messages:
    11,670
    That would vary from chipset to chipset. You would have to look up the various chipset specs to get the exact thermal specifications. The chipset threshold will be higher than CPU thresholds.
     
  13. win2kpro

    win2kpro

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2005
    Messages:
    11,670
    Oiling the bearing works for awhile if the fan is just noisy. If the fan hesitates, that is indicitive of severe wear on one part of the bearing, and the fan should be replaced.

    The biggest problem I have encountered with some of the fan replacements especially on 45mm x 10mm fans is the newer model fan spokes will sometimes not align with the tapped holes in the heatsink where older model 45mm x 10mm fans have been previously used.

    In those cases, I have used one screw that would line up, and then on the other spokes I have used Polyseamseal Adhesive Caulk to secure the other two spokes to the heatsink.

    The Polyseamseal Adhesive Caulk holds very well, and can be fairly easily removed if subsequent fan replacement is necessary at some point.
     
  14. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/876606

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice