grounding yourself

Status
This thread has been Locked and is not open to further replies. Please start a New Thread if you're having a similar issue. View our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

starwolf39

Thread Starter
Joined
Jan 26, 2001
Messages
276
what does it EXACTLY mean to "grounding yourself," and how do you go about doing it?
 
Joined
May 26, 2001
Messages
7,530
If you are talking about when you are working inside your computer you touch the power supply. It means you are "grounding" the electrical charge in your body from static.
 

starwolf39

Thread Starter
Joined
Jan 26, 2001
Messages
276
yes that's what i am talking about. so u just touch it and your OK? i heard that u have to touch it every so often to discharge the static electricity. also, where on the power supply do you touch anyway?
 
Joined
Dec 7, 2001
Messages
13
I think you are refering to getting rid of the static electricity charge within your body and or clothing.
Like when you sometimes touch something metal and get a small shock.
If you touch a sensative electrical component such as a memmory card or chip you could discharge this into the component and ZAP it.
Touching the metal case of the PC should be sufficient to get rid of this charge or you can buy a special wrist band that has a clip that is attached to the case. So you don't fry your chips.
 
Joined
May 26, 2001
Messages
7,530
It is very important that you do this when you are working in your computer. Not many people do, and it isn't a very burdensome thing to do when you are talking about saving your entire system from a possible meltdown. It is probably most important with the HD. The HD is probably one of the most sensitive pieces of equipment in your computer and if you fry that you are up you know where, because you will have lost all of your data.
 
Joined
Apr 1, 2001
Messages
78
I would think that the RAM is the most sensitive.....i learnt my lesson on grounding myself the hard way,I fried 2 64MB RAM Chips and 1 256MB RAM Chip.
 

RT

Joined
Aug 20, 2000
Messages
12,233
starwolf39

For more than you might care to know about static electricity, I submit this for your approval, since I often get zapped:

http://www.amasci.com/emotor/zapped.html

:)

-----------------------------------------------


CMLSS,
Sorry about your chips,
that's why I try to be careful, I fall into cursing almost every day the weather is cool and dry, I get zapped so much!

BTW
:D

:eek: NO !!! DON'T EXPLODE !!!:eek:

:D :D I like that!
 
Joined
Jul 29, 2001
Messages
21,334
You don't necessarily have to touch the power supply to avoid static discharge. You can touch any part of the case and make your electrical potential the same as the case. To avoid damaging components....hold onto the case before and while you are picking up the part....same principal as using a grounding strap and connecting it to the case.
 
Joined
Apr 5, 2001
Messages
226
AND MOST OF ALL WHEN WORKING INSIDE YOUR CASE, MAKE SURE TO UNPLUG THE UNIT, SO YOU DONT GET ZAPPED!!! LOL!!
 
Joined
Jul 29, 2001
Messages
21,334
Never been ZAPPED.....I have heard on newer PC's like ones with ATX power supplies you should leave them plugged in. This keeps the entire case grounded, if your house or office is grounded properly, and discharges directly to ground instead of any internal components.
 
Joined
Aug 9, 2001
Messages
1,440
Wonder if the memchips nowadays are more delicate than in the olde days :)
First "real" computer I owned was a Tandy HX-1000. I ordered memory chips to take it from, I think, 8K RAM to 16K. Anyway, a friend who was well-versed in computing, being employed at a local store selling comp.'s and doing repairs, came over to the house to put the chips in.
They came in a plastic tube for protection, and the chips themselves were stuck in a foam strip.
he opens the tube, takes the chips off the strip, then while holding them in one hand, he opens the computer case & installs the chips--all without being grounded OR wearing a strap of any sort!! :eek:
To this day, I still don't know wether to think he was just lucky the chips weren't damaged ("Don't worry about holding them, do it all the time at work" was his only comment re grounding when asked) or the chips back in the 80's were of sterner stuff than now :)
 
Joined
May 26, 2001
Messages
7,530
Well, even in recent times I have touched and installed things like ram without being grounded and never fried anything. (In fact... I have been lucky enough to never have damaged a computer component) I always ground out with more sensitive (whether they are or not) peices of equipment like hard drives just because they would be expensive to replace. However, I may get licky a lot that doesn't mean you should puch your luck. Always ground yourself to avoid any static discharge just because it onyl takes a second of your time but is a huyge hassel if you zap something.

As to your ram question... back then in the 70s and 80s they used different ram then we have now. I don't recall how they were made, who made them or their sensitivity, but my quess is that they were much less sensitive back then. I do remember though that memory was divided into many different cells and no one process could spread over multiple cells very easily... or may be I don't remember it that well. I also don't remember that well, but I think up until about 85 all they used was volitle ram... meaning the contents were retained when power was shut off. I think siemens was the big manufacture of memory back then. I know for sure that they were one of the only companies Intel contracted with to manufacture their cpu chips. (the 8080, 8086, 80186, ect.)
 
Status
This thread has been Locked and is not open to further replies. Please start a New Thread if you're having a similar issue. View our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 807,865 other people just like you!

Latest posts

Members online

Top