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Harbor Breeze Remote Controlled Fan/Light - Light won't work

Discussion in 'Do It Yourself (Not Computer-Related)' started by indyfoley, May 2, 2016.

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  1. indyfoley

    indyfoley Thread Starter

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    We have a Harbor Breeze remote controlled ceiling fan/light. The light quit working a few weeks back. The fan and light are controlled by one wall switch. There are 2 pull cords and the remote. The fan works using all 3 controls (wall, pull-cord, remote). The light DOES NOT work using any method. However - when attempting to turn the light on via remote - we can hear the switch clicking inside the light unit. Still - pull-cord method doesn't work.

    Since we can actually "hear" the switch when attempting to control from the remote - what can that mean?

    Any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. indyfoley

    indyfoley Thread Starter

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    Also - we've verified that the bulbs work on other lights in the house.
     
  3. T4tlrman

    T4tlrman

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    Terry
    You verified it's a good bulb by using it in other lights. Right?

    What does it sound like when you hear the light switch (light switch?) attempt to turn on?

    Did you install it? How long have you had/used it?

    I've installed them for years and Harbor Breeze can be problematic in the lower price range. I installed a cheaper one about 2 years ago that's run only with remote. Your problem is not the remote, but this fan loses communication between the remote transmitter and receiver every few months and requires changing channels to re-establish connection.

    The first time it happened it was less than a year old an Lowes was very co-operative and supplied a new replacement. That's why I mention this. If it's less than a year old take it back. H.B. warrants them for a year.

    From what you say about the sound - if it's a buzz that's not really good. The ground wire could be loose and the light socket defective or worn and trying to short out but without a good ground connection it won'trip the breaker.

    If it's a click that's not really better, but it's better than a buzz. Buzz could mean a shock hazard if you touch the fan. A click is indicates an attempt to light but whatever is causing the failure is preventing it from lighting.

    Does the noise occur with the switch, the chains and the remote or is it just one, all or a combination.
    I'll post again soon if not right away but I don't want to be overwhelming with questions that need answered.
     
  4. T4tlrman

    T4tlrman

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    I see pull cord doesn't work with light from your post. The fan works with all three. That's a good thing.
    A new light socket may be needed but not before the old one is circuit tested? Do you own one? You don't need to test for continuity or resistance so a simple circuit tester will do the trick.
    Would be great if you had a nice meter, you could diagnose farther in and away from the fan.

    I prefer not to leave a wall switch active if the unit has a remote. If you have the 3 options as you do it can be frustrating from a trouble shooting aspect when something goes wrong.

    Pull cords and remote work operation is fine, but there's still times when one or the other is off and you go round & round.

    You know the pull cord on the outside is for the fan and the fan is 3 speeds and an off position. If I'm turned around that's not an issue. Fan has 3 speeds and the light, depending on the model/price range is one to 3 choices for brightness and an off.

    From what you say there's only one light. Right? That is easier to deal with than more than one.

    The not so good news is if you find the circuit test shows the light socket cold you have to drop the cover at the top where it goes over the pivot ball and is attached to the mounting bracket to gain access to the wiring.

    A lot of the fan will need disassembled. The blades will be in the way and could be damaged. Light cover of course has to come off. The light socket housing has to be removed from the center and the light wires need disconnect at the top.

    It's best to bring the whole fan down after wire disconnection because it's very difficult to work over your head. Make sure the blades come off because it's easy see the fan falling over or off a surface. Never good.
    More to come
     
  5. T4tlrman

    T4tlrman

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    Cutting to the chase - it may be as much work to cost the same to repair the problem as it was to install it the first time.
    I've been known to suspend a fan from the ceiling mount with a coat hanger and work on wiring without taking it down or dismantling it. It's a trick and still difficult, but a wiring problem can't be corrected if it's on the floor.
    That's why I asked how old it was and mentioned the quality and durability relative to price.
    If you installed it and can re-install it you lower the cost considerably. A new socket is not expensive, though not all fan light fixtures are repairable that way. They sometimes require obtaining a genuine, same part from the manufacturer.
    I won't say what the odds are it's a faulty ground, I'm no good at probability. That would be the least painful of all the problems and easy to correct.
    That would be on par with a bad pull cord switch. But that isn't likely to be the problem because the remote bypasses it.
    I'm sure I've said too much.
    But a little more behind this
     
  6. T4tlrman

    T4tlrman

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    Is yours an older home? Older than 20 to 25 years.
    Do you know if it was built with aluminum wiring?
    That in itself isn't a big problem but hooking up new fixtures like your fan that have copper wiring to aluminum wiring require using an anti-corrosive salve at the old & new junction.

    I don't know that I've been any help. I don't want to encourage you to do it if you never have. I suggest otherwise.
    If you purchase a new one inquire about the installation fee and ask your friends & or neighbors if they have someone that does work for them. It doesn't sound like this needs done right away so take advantage of that. If you find a referred person get their fee & pay no more than the store installation fee and ideally if you could find someone that would install it for 1/3 less than the store there's a chance their honest!
    I install them for 1/2 what the stores charge & I tell you I next to never work for a person just once.
    Good day & Good Luck, T
     
  7. T4tlrman

    T4tlrman

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    Forgot to say the electrical connections common black/white for the light at the junction could also cause the problem if a good connection isn't being made.
     
  8. storage_man

    storage_man

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    This sounds more like a faulty wall switch. If its bad and not making a connection, the remote and the pull chain will not work.
     
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  9. T4tlrman

    T4tlrman

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    That's very unlikely.
    The connection in the wall switch isn't the problem because it would also affect the fan operation... and the fan is working with remote and pull chains and wall switch.

    And that's why I don't like to have a wall switch, pull cords & a remote running a fan.
    I find it's best to remove the switch in the wall, reconnect the common black and put a blank cover on the wall switch opening.

    Some people leave the wall switch hooked up in case they loose the remote. But if you lose the remote you can still use the pull chain to run all fan & light variables and turn each on and off separately.

    You can't run variable speeds for the fan, or adjust light brightness with a wall switch unless you have two push on dimmer switches. One for fan control and one for light control. It may be possible to find one that will run both fan & light but unless you're investing in a top of the line luxury fan no one would bother looking for one.

    If your wall switch is a regular toggle (flip up / push down) or a butterfly switch they only complete the circuit & that's it. No variable control.
    And push on / dimmer switches draw more amps and hum and can actually damage the fan motor and fan light over time.

    Simply put - the more ways you have to control a fan, the more things you have that could go wrong.
     
  10. storage_man

    storage_man

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    Maybe - but I think the op has the same kind of setup that I have. I have a wall switch (One which turns the fan on, and another that turns the light kit on). If the op gets back, and states there 2 switches, then the problem would be in the wall switch.
     
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  11. T4tlrman

    T4tlrman

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    I see what you're saying S.M. and don't disagree. We need more info.
     
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