Hard Drive Cluster Defects

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bme1

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Oct 25, 2001
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I discovered that a HD of a PC developed 2 defective clusters thru scandisk. I tried reformatting the disk but the damage was still there. I want to partition the disk in such a way that the defective clusters will be on a secondary partition and not on the active or boot partition(usually C:). Please tell me how to achieve this.
:confused:
 

WhitPhil

Gone but never forgotten
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Two defective clusters is not the end of the world. And, once scandisk has marked them as bad, they can no longer be seen by the system (and a reformat can not make them good again. They are bad spots on the drive).

Just keep an eye, to ensure that you are not getting more. In which case, it is a good sign of a drive heading south.
 

bme1

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Oct 25, 2001
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I just did scandisk on the drive and it came out with "0 ERRORS" after a thorough scan!! Maybe just a fluke? I likewise don't believe reformat or scandisk can remove the errors.

Thanks anyway for your advice!
 
Joined
Oct 16, 2001
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If you have bad clusters that are more than that, what do you do? What caused them and what exactly is a "cluster"?

Jessica
 

WhitPhil

Gone but never forgotten
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Hi,
Can you be a little more specific on what "more than that" is?

In general, bad sectors can be an indication of a failing disk, especially if the numbers continue to increase even though scandisk is fixing them.

A disk is laid out in sectors which are 512 bytes each. These in turn are "grouped" into clusters. The number of sectors per cluster depends on the size of the disk partition. If you open a dos window and enter CHKDSK, the x,xxx bytes in each allocation unit, is the size of the cluster on the disk. The x,xxx is divisible by 512.
From a file size point of view, a file can never take up less space than one cluster.
eg: if the cluster size is 4,096 bytes, a file that is 20 bytes long, will take up 4,096 bytes (1 cluster), and a file that is 5,000 bytes long will take up 8,192 bytes or 2 clusters.
 
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