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Hard Drive trouble

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by kh1zager, Aug 4, 2006.

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  1. bbearren

    bbearren

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    Running CHKDSK /r is certainly simpler than replacing a drive and installing XP, but that's up to you.

    Again, the caveat is to keep good, up to date backups; which we should all be doing.
     
  2. Bob Cerelli

    Bob Cerelli

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    bbearren,
    I'm glad that you consider a bad sector a defect.
    That the error message shouldn't be ignored.
    That you finally clarified that chkdsk does not really repair a defective drive.

    kh1zager,
    I'm glad you decided to replace a defective drive with a good one. They don't get better. They only get worse.
     
  3. bbearren

    bbearren

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    I don't necessarily consider a drive with bad sectors as a defective drive.

    Bad sectors primarily cause two types of errors; write errors, and read errors. CHKDSK repairs those errors by retrieving any recoverable data, writing that data to known good sectors, and marking the bad sectors as unusable.

    Since the O/S will no longer write to the marked bad sectors, those sectors no longer cause read/write errors. Within the parameters of the O/S, the drive has been repaired.
     
  4. Bob Cerelli

    Bob Cerelli

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    It's good you clarified that don't consider a drive with bad sectors as defective. Can you give some more detailed information on what causes bad sectors in the first place?
     
  5. bbearren

    bbearren

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  6. Bob Cerelli

    Bob Cerelli

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    It's really good to know from Seagate's web page posted that:

    "New bad sectors, sometimes called grown defects, are often caused by some kind of physical damage".

    And from the second link:
    "Warning: Bad sectors on a modern hard disk are almost always an indication of a greater problem with the disk" and "Personally, I will not use any hard disk that is developing bad sectors. The risk of data loss is too high"
     
  7. bbearren

    bbearren

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    Seagate also says:

    Correcting Bad Sectors
    SeaTools Desktop Edition can check your drive’s health to determine if any serious problems are present. If you run the long Seagate test then SeaTools desktop can reallocate any empty sectors that are bad. If the sector contains data SeaTools will let you know the sector is bad, but will not attempt to reallocate it.

    If you have bad sectors that contain data there are several options available from other vendors. One such option is the disk error-checking utility built into Windows 2000 and Windows XP.

    To open the error checking utility follow these steps:

    Double-click My Computer, and right-click the hard disk.

    On the shortcut menu, click Properties, and on the Tools tab in the Properties dialog box, click Check Now in the Error-Checking Status area.

    In the Check Disk dialog box, select the Automatically Fix File System Errors check box, select the Scan For And Attempt Recovery Of Bad Sectors check box, and then click Start.
    View Windows help on detecting and repairing disk errors for more information.​

    And from the third link:

    Despite the precision manufacturing processes used to create hard disks, it is virtually impossible to create a disk with tens of millions of sectors and not have some errors show up. Imperfections in the media coating on the platter or other problems can make a sector inoperable.​

    And:

    To allow for maximum reliability then, each disk drive is thoroughly tested for any areas that might have errors at the time it is manufactured. All the sectors that have problems or are thought to be unreliable, are recorded in a special table. This is called defect mapping. Some drives go even further than this, mapping out not only the sectors that are questionable, but the ones surrounding them as well. Some drives will map out entire tracks as a safety precaution.​

    Basically, if you own a hard drive, it probably has bad sectors; they're already hidden from the O/S on a fresh drive. For those that show up later, I use CHKDSK.

    If someone prefers to throw out such a drive and buy a new drive instead, that's fine with me, too.
     
  8. Bob Cerelli

    Bob Cerelli

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    That's wonderful news. Not really what is happening in this case but really neat stuff.
     
  9. bbearren

    bbearren

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    I would do what I have always done:

    I would run CHKDSK /r.

    I would image the drive.

    I would continue to use it.​
     
  10. Bob Cerelli

    Bob Cerelli

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    It doesn't sound like you are in over your head at all. You know how to put in a hard drive.

    And since you already did a format and reinstall before, you even know how to do that as well. Since the hard drive was failing before and after a format and clean install, from the links posted, you are headed in a more reliable long-term solution.
     
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