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Hardwire - Running wires

Discussion in 'Networking' started by rickzter, Feb 19, 2012.

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  1. rickzter

    rickzter Thread Starter

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    I need to run a CAT5 wire from a router to two other rooms.

    After I do the first run, can I use a splitter at that point to make my last connection in the farthest room? Or do I need to run two seperate wires from where the router is to each room.

    Thank You
     
  2. hi09

    hi09

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    a splitter? what do you mean by that? you could put a switch there..

    so from main room you have your router.. a cat 5e going to the second room pluging into a switch. From the switch one cable goes to your device, second cable to goes to next room...that would work
     
  3. Frank4d

    Frank4d Retired Trusted Advisor

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    You need to either run two CAT5 cables from the router to the rooms; or one CAT5 from the router to a switch, and then two cables from the switch (one to each room).

    Two port splitters are also available for about $15, but I don't recommend them. You need one at each end of the cable, and they don't work at gigagit ethernet speed.
     
  4. gyrgrls

    gyrgrls Banned

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    You don't really need a switch, for just two clients, but you need an ethernet hub, at least.
    Since hubs are all but obsolete, switches are a good choice.

    If you have to bore through a wall, to run CAT5, it's better to run one cable than two cables.
    Two can become five, very quickly, and then the hole's not big enough...

    Just run a single CAT5 to the other room, and hook it up to an 8 port switch for about $60 USD.

    You can hardly find ethernet hubs anymore, and there are no simple splitters for CAT5, as far as I know.

    An ethernet hub will put you in COLLISION DOMAIN, where it will slow down the network.
    An ethernet switch, however, will block packets on a local TCP/IP basis, according to your LAN setup.

    NOTE: An ethernet switch must be installed behind a router, as it is NAT aware.
    If your broadband modem has a built-in router, then you're good to go.
     
  5. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    I need to correct some things here.

    Yes, running more than one wire can lead to getting out of hand with the number of cables you ultimately end up with. But it is always better to run more than less as the installation costs and hassles out weigh the costs of the additional cable. I have never heard anyone complain they had too many cables run to a specific location. On the contrary, I have always run across a situation where not having enough network drops resulted in some major hardships. In home network runs, I always go with the rule that one should always pull at least two cables if you're going to go through the hassles of running a network drop.

    On the topic of switches versus hubs. One should never use a hub in today's world unless there is a very specific need. Even with a small number of clients where collisions may not create such a large impact on network performance, the other issue you're going to have is the fact that all attached devices must share the same bandwidth (which is limited to a maximum of 100 Mbps) and also all devices must run at half duplex.

    On the topic of switches. The typical switch doesn't operate at layer 3/4 where TCP/IP operates. Switches typically operate at layer 2 whereas hubs operate at layer 1. What makes a switch a switch is the fact that a switch creates point to point network connections between the switch and the connecting device. As a result, the switch and the connecting device can run at full duplex not worrying about other devices potentially wanting to talk on the same network segment necessitating the need for CSMA/CD and all the issues that come with it. Switches also allow better performance because a switch learns and stores MAC addresses in memory (sometimes referred to as a content addressable memory (CAM)). What this does is to allow the switch for unicast traffic (typically the majority of LAN traffic) to be directed to the correct port and thus the correct receiving host without flooding all ports on the switch. At no point does TCP/IP come into the mix in how a switch operates.
     
  6. rickzter

    rickzter Thread Starter

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    Thanks. Any idea who can do the work if I decide not to do it meself?
     
  7. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Without paying an arm and a leg, I would think any company that does home automation, structured wiring, etc should be able to do it. Hopefully who ever comes out will have the appropriate testers to validate the cable runs.
     
  8. gyrgrls

    gyrgrls Banned

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    Ah, but a router doesn't cost that much more than a switch.

    LOL Just pulling your chain

    - John
     
  9. gyrgrls

    gyrgrls Banned

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    I'm at Taco Bell, right now. I'm ordering a 7 layer burrito.

    the trouble is: their sauce is not hot enough for me.

    Time to run for the border?
     
  10. gyrgrls

    gyrgrls Banned

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    You're kidding, right?
     
  11. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    No, I'm not. Your point?
     
  12. gyrgrls

    gyrgrls Banned

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    My point is this: I have seen too much incompetence in the field to justify
    hiring just anyone in the yellow pages - whether it comes to automotive repair
    (ASE Certified, even!) or office wiring / networking.

    You did qualify your assessment by using the word "hopefully", when describing
    assumed ability on a broad basis, though.

    My response, the phrase: "You're kidding, right?", was of course, used idiomatically.
    I did not mean to imply that you were, or that I thought you were, literally joking.

    But the OP wants to do it himself, with guidance from the masses, rather than plunk
    down a hefty hunk of change to roll a truck to his pad. And that's why we're here. :)
     
  13. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    In case you didn't read what the OP posted:

    The OP asked where he could go if he didn't want to do it himself. You're also assuming a lot here. I gave him an option of where to go to have it done. Even people who feel like they can DIY it or have done it, don't have the proper equipment to ensure that it's done right. Do you have a $3000 cable tester to make sure the cable runs are done right? I doubt anyone here has one. I certainly don't. I have done most of the terminations in my house and even though I follow best practices, I can't say for certain I have the drops done right.
     
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