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HDD Capacity

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Whirlwind, Sep 5, 2000.

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  1. Whirlwind

    Whirlwind Thread Starter

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    Hello all,

    My PC HDD is Seagate Ultra DMA Cylinders: 1048 Heads: 255 Sectors: 63, its capacity as stated in the specs is 8.6 GB, which shown 8623 MB in the booting process, but when I check it in Windows Explorer, C:\ > properties, capacity (used space plus free space, please note that I have no partition on this drive at all) only shows 7.82 GB (approx. 8220.8 MB right?)
    So, where the other 400 MB has gone? Is there any logical explanation to this? If this is a problem, please show me how to fix it.



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  2. ETS

    ETS

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    Hi Whirlwind,

    Actual hard disk capacity is a matter of interpretation and different programs interpret it differently. There is also a certain amount of overhead that is sometimes unaccounted for after partitioning and formatting. If the drive has been formatted then it has also been partitioned even though there may only be 1 partition.

    In other words there is no problem with your drive.
     
  3. Whypick1

    Whypick1

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    To further explain ETS, HD manuf. report a GB as 1million megabytes. While in actuality (this is what O/S's report a GB as), 1GB is 2 to the 20th power or 1024 squared (1048576).

    It's pretty easy to see why, i don't think many ppl know that a GB is 1048576mb, it's just easier to remember 1 million.

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    Just remember, i could be wrong.
     
  4. Whirlwind

    Whirlwind Thread Starter

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    Hi ETS,
    Thank you for spending time to answer my query, it's good to know that the drive is OK [​IMG]
    I've heard about BIOS and OS limitations which made difficul to overcome the 8.4GB barrier, wonder if this is the case of my HDD?
     
  5. bd

    bd

    Joined:
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    Hi Whirlwind and ETS,

    I read the questions and was thinking of the answers .Then I read ETS's reply and it was exactly what I was thinking so I will just say right on !

    Bob [​IMG]

    I see two more replies got in before mine but I will add that I don't think the restrictions you mention in your last reply are affecting your hard drive in this case,but even if it were you would still be getting all but two tenths of a gig of the drives full capacity anyway.



    [This message has been edited by bd (edited 09-05-2000).]
     
  6. ETS

    ETS

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    Yes, 8.4 gig is a bios limitation that was overcome during the latter part of 1997. Since your system displays the drive as 8.6 gig during the boot process that means that your bios is newer and does not have the limitation.
    BTW, Hi guys [​IMG]
     
  7. Whirlwind

    Whirlwind Thread Starter

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    Thank you all for your replies.

    I have another question: is it OK to have the second HDD with different Make/Model? i.e. My 1st HDD is Seagate Ultra DMA 8.6MB, now I intend to add another one in but this one is Maxtor 4.6 MB, will there be any conflict?

    And some add-ins related to Whypick1's post above:

    Converting from Gbytes to Mbytes to Kbytes to bytes
    1 Kbyte = 1024 bytes (2 to the 10th power)
    1 Mbyte = 1,048,576 bytes (2 to the 20th power)
    1 Gbyte = 1,073,741,824 bytes (2 to the 30th power)

    Examples
    8.6 Gbytes = 8.6 x 1,073,741,824 = 9,234,179,686 bytes
    2047 Mbytes = 2047 x 1,048,576 = 2,146,435,072 bytes
    1024 Kbytes = 1024 x 1024 = 1,048,576 bytes



    [This message has been edited by Whirlwind (edited 09-06-2000).]
     
  8. bd

    bd

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    Hi ,

    Make and model shouldn't cause conflicts . It is done all the time.

    Bob [​IMG]
     
  9. ETS

    ETS

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    That is correct. This used to be a problem back in the earlier days of IDE before it became a recognized standard. Now everyone sticks to the standard and conflicts are pretty much a thing of the past.
     
  10. Whirlwind

    Whirlwind Thread Starter

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    Thanks Bob.
    Do you know about Partition magic 5.0, well, if you do, then you already know about the PartitionInfo which part of the program. In the 'Partition Information' window (for disk 1), the volume of C: has 2 Partition type: FAT32 and Free Space (???), the lower part of this window is Disk Geometry Information with Cylinders = 1048, Heads = 255, Sector/Track = 63
    When the Volume (assume it meant the C:\ drive) is selected, the Disk & Partition errors: info field on the top right shows this:
    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>
    Info: End C,H,S values were large drive placeholders.
    Actual values are:
    0 0 80 0 1 1 0B 1023 254 63 63 16450497
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
    Please explain to me what's wrong through the infos above. Thank you for your time

    [This message has been edited by Whirlwind (edited 09-06-2000).]
     
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