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Help - Partitioning a new hard drive

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by swanny65, Feb 8, 2005.

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  1. swanny65

    swanny65 Thread Starter

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    i have bought a new pc which will have at its core an athlon64 2800+ cpu, 1024 ram and 120gb seagate hard disc. i am going to install windows 2000 sp4 as my operating system - i dont like xp.
    as i am starting from scratch i thought i would considering partitioning the hard drive.
    does it have any real benefits?
    how do i do it? (a recommended weblink would be helpful please) -
    i can borrow an old version of partition magic (5 i think) is that any good?
    how many partions do i need?
    finally, is there a simple way to transfer the data, minus the operating system, from my current hard drive to the new one without having to make several backup cd's and copying these disc's onto my new hard drive. i have approx 20-30 gb of data i would like to transfer accross......
    thanks for looking....swanny
     
  2. ratchet

    ratchet

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    If the new machine is a Dell, Compaq..., will it have a recovery partition?

    Black Viper's is an exellent site with screen shots.
    As to partitions I would go with 2, one for the os and the other for storage.
    You can create them during the setup process. Image 1.4-1.9 at BV's.

    I would make sure you have every driver for 2K before you begin.
     
  3. NightLord

    NightLord

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    I find the nicest thing about having another partition is that you can easily format your system (boot-) partition without touching your files that are located on another partition. It also improves performance and all so there are many reasons to split your drive in two (or more).

    Partitioning is easy, as long as you follow the rules :D
    I always used fdisk for it, just boot your system from a floppy and use fdisk to first remove then create a primary (the boot) partition and secondary partition (e.g. your storage partition).
    You have to format them as well otherwise they cannot be used.

    With WinXP though, it's easily done within the setup procedure... Eeehh wait didn't new versions of Win2K have that as well?? I'm confused now :D
    I'm talking about the bootable setup cd that will ask you where to install windows... That's when you're also presented with the choice to delete and create partitions.

    Anyway, first remove the partition on your drive, then create one with e.g. 30 Gb (more than enough for win2K) and one with the reast of the drive space.

    Here's some info about fdisk: http://www.fdisk.com

    However if you have a windows cd that boots and allows partitioning I would definitely recommend that. Partition Magic will surely work as well, I've never used it though because partitioning really isn't that difficult.

    Use the NTFS file system by the way, it's better and faster.

    Cheers.

    /NL
     
  4. swanny65

    swanny65 Thread Starter

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    Thanks for the quick replies - ntfs was the question i forgot to ask!!!but will now use this file system
    The new computer will be unbrand and built/tested to my specifiaction by an independant company.
    i had read about fdisc when i formatted and installed win 2k on my current computer. however i got confused and ended up doing a basic install with no partitioning. i was intending to boot the new computer from a 4 floppy disc set i already have / format the hard drive / partion / and then install windows. is this the correct way about the job?
    any ideas on transferring the hard drive data?
    BTW - lunchbreak ended, will deal with replies after work
    thanks
     
  5. ratchet

    ratchet

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    You can set your machine to boot from the 2K CD, no boot floppies needed.
    You can do everything from the CD, or you could use DiscWizard Starter Edition to partition and format your drive.

    1st Partition the drive, it's like creating chapters in a book, the technical term is volume. Your operating system will see each volume as a seperate physical drive.

    2nd Format the Partition using the file system you have chosen.
    What Is NTFS?

    After you get your OS installed you can slave in your old drive and transfer file to one of the partitions you created.

    Guide to Installing IDE/ATA devices
     
  6. swanny65

    swanny65 Thread Starter

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    Ratchet - thanks for your comprehensive replies. i appreciate all the advice i have received yourself and nightlord. swanny
     
  7. swanny65

    swanny65 Thread Starter

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    A couple of further questions on this subject if you wouldn't mind helping me.
    1) if i install my operating system in the first partion, do i then have to install all program files e.g. office, media player, anti virus etc in that same partition, and use the other partition(s) for storage of data and other files etc
    2) having received the pc. the new hard drive, a maxtor not a seagate, appears "sata" as it is connected by a round cable with lots of wires. my old hard drive, a deskstar, was connected by a ribbon and there i am unsure if i can connect it to the motherboard and transfer the data.....i am sorry for the lack of technical terms but trust you have an idea of what i am talking about
    3) any other useful links on the subject would be gratefully received
    the motherboard is an asus k8s-mx.
    thanks for looking
     
  8. NightLord

    NightLord

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    1) Usually: yes. Heavy programs (3DS max, photoshop, even games like HL2 and Doom) may advise you to use another disk as their scratch disk (virtual memory), but that only improves performance when it really is another physical drive. You are using partitions so to make life easier just put all your system stuff on C and use your D (and so on) for storage.

    2) "Lots of wires" sounds to me as ATA and both connections to your motherboard allow primary and secondary, which are lined op in series. SATA just has a small flat cable that really doesn't look like much.
    IDE cables used to be wide ribbons, nowadays round cables are often used: same thing different shape.
    You installed your operating system without any "third party" drivers? Then I'd say you have an ATA drive because SATA needs drivers in the Windows setup.

    This is SATA: http://www.explosivelabs.com/reviews/barracudav_sata/sata_cable.jpg

    This is a round IDE: http://images.gfx.no/0/19/round-ide-cable-3.jpg

    If you have round IDE Cables you can safely connect your old drive as well, if it's SATA it won't fit...

    /NL
     
  9. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    Messages:
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    Look at the drive itself. If it has the 40 pin type of connector, it is an ide [pata] drive. If it has a small cable with a 3/4" connector, that is a sata type of drive.

    There is no "right" way to partition your drive; there is what works for you. When I setup a system, I make a partition of 15-20 gig for the os and basic apps like office, photoshop, etc. Games, data, mp3, etc can go into the other partition.

    In addition I would recommend getting some type of imaging software. You can image your system partition and restore it if there is any problem. I make an image for each system I build; this way when there is a problem it only takes a few min to restore it to a "clean install" state.

    BTW there is never a need to use dos / win9x tools to install nt based os. All partitioning / formatting is done from setup or from the recovery console.

    Good choice in os; I dislike xp also.
     
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