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home network printing with multiple routers

Discussion in 'Networking' started by ron111hughes, Mar 26, 2008.

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  1. ron111hughes

    ron111hughes Thread Starter

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    I have 3 computers in our home network. My computer is in our bedroom with Vista OS which is connected to a USRobotic router that connects to the cable modem. From the USrobotics router there is another network cable that runs down to the basement to a lynksys switch, where a computer with XP Pro is attached(hopping to change it to Linux OS and make it a server) from that switch another cable runs to the garage to a lynksys router that runs a cable to a spare bedroom connecting compact machine with XP home edtion, that has a printer, copier connected to it.
    I would like to access that printer from the other 2 computers.
    How do I configure the routers to do this? and maybe the switch too.
    Thank
    Ron
     
  2. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    Too many routers. :) Here's the recipe to configure that secondary router as a wireless switch, which will eliminate the NAT layer and the file/print sharing blockage.


    Connecting two (or more) SOHO broadband routers together.

    Configure the IP address of the secondary router(s) to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address, 192.168.0.253 for another router, etc.

    Note: Do this first, as you will have to reboot the computer to connect to the router again for the remaining changes.

    Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

    Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router, channels, encryption, etc.

    Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. Leave the WAN port unconnected!

    This procedure bypasses the routing function (NAT layer) and configures the router as a switch (or wireless access point for wireless routers).
     
  3. ron111hughes

    ron111hughes Thread Starter

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    Thank you, :)
    The only thing is, I can not use a crossover at the second router, because its' network cable from garage to basement switch is about
    45 ft through walls.
    You can email me at [email protected]
    Thank you
    Ron
     
  4. ron111hughes

    ron111hughes Thread Starter

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    oh, there is an uplink port though.
     
  5. Compaq__

    Compaq__

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    If I could recommend another solution. Replace the primary router with a Wireless Router. About $60. Get wireless cards for the other workstations and eliminate all the complexity and wires.
     
  6. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    You have an uplink port, no crossover needed. You also don't need to spend the $60. :D
     
  7. Compaq__

    Compaq__

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    JohnWill...good point! He'll need that $60 just for one tank of gas pretty soon!
     
  8. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    I just filled up my 350Z, not exactly a huge car (just a huge engine). $48, and I still had some gas left! :eek: :)
     
  9. ron111hughes

    ron111hughes Thread Starter

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    I tried the wireless, but for some reason it will not work. Wireless worked when we lived in 3 story, and a computer on each floor with the router in the basement. Now we live in a 1 story home with a basement and wireless will not work from West end to East end.
     
  10. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    Did you get it working?
     
  11. StumpedTechy

    StumpedTechy

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    Also keep in mind that the number of floors isn't as much of a factor as composition of floors/walls and ceilings and where your eletrical conduit is running. All of these greatly vary your signal strength.

    E.G. 3 story open floor plan house with wood beamed floors trumps a 1 story with a basement where the basment floor is covered over by cement and conduits and may have to go through mother earth just to get the signal to the far end of the house.

    I can't pretend to know your exact situation but know that wireless is affected by a wide variety of items including weather.
     
  12. ron111hughes

    ron111hughes Thread Starter

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    Not yet!
    I have not got around to configuing the second router yet
    Thank for the insight .
     
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