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Home wifi setup

Discussion in 'Networking' started by Buddy2020, Jul 3, 2019.

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  1. Buddy2020

    Buddy2020 Thread Starter

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    I have recently installed Wi-Fi light switches and a few plugs I have Alexa dots and echos through out the house as well as some smart TVs also we have the usual family devices like phones iPads and game systems. I have been having problems with some devices going offline while others stay on as well as sometimes the Wi-Fi name will not show up on the wireless search. I use an arris sb6190 modem with a night hawk r7000 router. We have 150 download speed and 11 upload. In all we have about 50 devices that connect wireless. What do I need to change to keep all devices working all the time?
     
  2. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    The claim is that router will handle up to 30 [wireless] devices. So, my guess is that you need to change the number of devices to 30 or less or to change from a single home/small office router to something that is designed to accommodate 50 or more devices.
     
  3. Buddy2020

    Buddy2020 Thread Starter

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    You mean like a mesh network or is there another way?
     
  4. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    I'm not knowledgeable about that.
     
  5. plodr

    plodr

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    Last edited: Jul 5, 2019
  6. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    A discussion about how many devices can be supported by a single wireless access point (of which your wireless router has one built in) cannot be based solely on a number. One has to look at what type of network usage is being done with each of the devices. If all devices are doing short burst transactional type connections such as web/http, then more devices can be supported. If devices are doing continuous streaming such as heavy video type traffic, the less devices can be supported on that single access point.

    In addition, discussion about wireless speed and what the slowest connection speed of a particular device becomes relevant here too. Wireless operates on a concept of air time fairness where only one device can talk over the channel at any given time; this includes the access point. As you add more devices, the wait time before any given device increases. To minimize this delay faster wireless speeds have been developed. The concept is the faster a wireless device can transmit what they need the sooner the air space can be freed up for another device to transmit. To follow on with this topic, the amount of chatter from various devices even though it might be short bursts can impact overall network performance too. Without getting into a rat hole, this is why it is ill advised to use a large subnet for your network space due to the various broadcast/chatter traffic that emanates from each client device.

    With that said, I only take the advertised number of devices supported by a consumer grade wireless router with a grain of salt. Enterprise level wireless access points typically can only support up to a maximum of 50 wireless devices before performance drops severely under ideal conditions. With any type of streaming type traffic, that number drops to about 15 or so. Another factor affecting the number of supported devices is the encryption overhead used to secure your wireless network.

    So my suggestion is to look into a unified wireless solution which typically employs wireless mesh technology. Some examples of wireless mesh systems are Netgear Orbi, Linksys Velop, Google WiFi, and Eero. These systems allow you to deploy access point throughout your home and all the access points operate as one single wireless system. This does not happen with the common practice of adding in a second wireless router. The problem with using a second wireless router is that even though you may configure it to use the same SSID but on a different channel, it will never support roaming. If you connect to one wireless router and then walk across your house to where you're very close to the second wireless router, your wireless client will not connect to the second wireless router. It will maintain connection with the first until it finally loses connectivity due to range or it may not but performance would drop to the floor. The other issue with having two wireless routers running together in the same physical environment is the inability of each wireless router to adjust the RF output so they're not stomping over each other where their RF signals overlap. All of these problems are eliminated with a unified wireless system. Other things unified wireless systems typically bring to bear is the ability to divert wireless clients to other access points in the system based on access point loading, or RF connection quality between client and AP. This is why I keep pushing the use of unified wireless systems over kludgy work arounds. The cost of these unified wireless systems are at a point where one should be using these systems to ensure proper wireless performance.
     
  7. DaveA

    DaveA Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Well put and this just may open some eyes as to why one's wireless is so slow!

    With the push (from IP's) for all of these different devices to have access to the internet, I can see that even the "mesh technology" will begin to slow down.

    NOTE: I am not worried about this, as our deck tops are on "Cat5" and we have 2 laptops, 2 Kindle's and 2 cell phones that are sometimes connected to the WiFi network. Our printers are connected by USB cables.
     
  8. plodr

    plodr

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    I don't have to worry either. Our home is dumb, just like the residents in it (two senior citizens)! We have about 11 devices (desktop computers, netbooks, android tablets, a smart phone, a networked printer and a wireless printer) but not all are on at the same time. I just looked and aside from the router, 2 devices are on.
     
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