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hot to setup internet windows nt 3.51 server

Discussion in 'Earlier Versions of Windows' started by XPUser1991, Nov 10, 2011.

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  1. XPUser1991

    XPUser1991 Thread Starter

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    i have windows nt 3.51 server setup and i have a windows 2000 pro client connecting to the setup domain (TEST-DOMAIN), i want to be able to connect to the Internet from the windows 2000 client through the server, like how a windows 2003/2008 server would, like at school, when i log in to the computer, i am logging in to the domain, which in turn gives me access to the internet, but their using server 2003, i want to be able to do this on nt 3.51 server.
     
  2. peterh40

    peterh40

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    If you have DNS installed on NT 3.51, load the DNS console and on the server properties, enter the IP address of your ISP's DNS servers in the Forwarders tab. That will allow you to access the domain and the internet.
     
  3. centauricw

    centauricw

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    The school's network is probably using Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server, which is a separate product for Windows Server 2003/2008 and integrates with Active Directory to provide public Internet access on a per-user basis. You will not be able to duplicate this with Windows NT Server 3.51 as it was developed and released before access to the Internet was common.
     
  4. Squashman

    Squashman Trusted Advisor

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    I do remember in Windows 2000 server you could setup Routing and Remote access so that all your network traffic could go through the server and then to the Internet. No special add-ons required. Basically turns your server into a NAT router. I don't remember if that was even a feature of NT4 let alone NT 3.51.
     
  5. centauricw

    centauricw

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    The default network protocol for Windows NT 3.51 was IPX/SPX (NetWare, anybody?) and it also supported NetBEUI (a fast but non-routable protocol). TCP/IP was an option in Windows NT 4.0, but it was included primarily for early IIS support. When Windows NT 3.1 was released, nearly all client computers ran DOS and Windows 3.1. Networking for Windows at this stage was added with Windows 3.11 for Workgroups, with IPX/SPX and NetBEUI as the primary protocols. Even Windows 95 and Windows 98 required a separate TCP/IP network stack (with Trumpet TCP/IP being the most popular, as I remember). The TCP/IP network protocol did not become the default protocol until Windows 2000 (both Server and Professional).

    The Routing and Remote Access Service (RRAS) didn't appear until Windows 2000 Server (I believe). Hardware routers were expensive things as well back then and I used Linux to route TCP/IP. Even today, I don't generally use Windows for routing even with RRAS (it's not a core service that Windows handles well).

    Since you can buy a consumer Internet router (with or without wireless) very cheap, I'd use that as the router and connect everything to the Internet through that.
     
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