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how can I determine the TRUE creation date of a file?

Discussion in 'Tech Tips and Reviews' started by sfperry, May 13, 2009.

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  1. sfperry

    sfperry Thread Starter

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    I need to find the exact creation date of a file that was copied onto a CD. The creation date displayed in "attributes" appears to be the date that the file was copied to CD. My operating system is Windows Vista.
     
  2. cwwozniak

    cwwozniak Chuck Trusted Advisor

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    Hi and welcome to TSG.

    I don't believe that you can determine the dates for the files on the CD. The burning software that created the disc may have an option to allow the user to either keep the original dates or change the file date attributes to be the date that files are burned to the disc.I have also read that some versions of CD burning software may have bugs that change the date even if the option to use the original dates is chosen.
     
  3. daniel_b2380

    daniel_b2380

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    if a system or such file - maybe check the version number?
    if this is a 'personal' file - was this info entered in the 'proper' fields?
    [like with .doc, .xls, .pdf, and so on]
     
  4. deazy86

    deazy86

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    My opinion is also as same as Chuck, the burning software may change the original dates with the date of burning CD.
     
  5. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    If the dates in the file directory entry are wrong, there is no way to determine the "true" creation date, think about it. :)
     
  6. hewee

    hewee

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    If the burning software changed the set then I bet there is a option in the setting to use the dates already on the file or the date the CD was made.
     
  7. gyrgrls

    gyrgrls Banned

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    Yeah, it depends on the burning software,
    and the options you select.

    I don't think CDFS has the same extended attributes
    as NTFS. You might check out UDF instead of ISO-9660 CDFS.
    But if you do, watch out for compatibility issues, and also,
    you must first format the empty CD, unlike CDFS,
    which writes raw blocks and uses a simple TOC (Windows
    makes the TOC look like a directory tree)

    Hop on over to CD Freaks
    All your questions can be answered there.
     
  8. gyrgrls

    gyrgrls Banned

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    Yes, and once the files are copied to another medium,
    the old attributes are lost, unless copied.

    But if the original files are still on the hard drive,
    NT stores the extended attributes in the MFT.
    Just right-click on the toolbar - either Name,
    Size, Type... etc.
    Select whatever you like from the pop-up menu. :)

    Then, you just drop to a DOS prompt,
    call up attrib with whatever switches you want,
    redirect it to a text file, and burn that file to CD along with
    your data, provided you have the Windows resource kit
    installed.
     
  9. gyrgrls

    gyrgrls Banned

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    Better yet:

    Just erase Windows and install Linux! :D
     
  10. daniel_b2380

    daniel_b2380

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    from post #3
    EXAMPLE: a word document
    - open word
    - on file menu, choose properties
    - LOOK at the pic
    [​IMG]
     

    Attached Files:

  11. gyrgrls

    gyrgrls Banned

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    If it's .docfile in msword format,
    then you can just enter the information
    when you create the document, and it will
    remain imbedded in the metadata.

    But it will only be positively visible in
    its native application, like Excel, Word, etc..
    and not necessarily Windows Explorer,
    because we are dealing with metadata,
    not attributes. Hope this makes sense to you.
    It's hard for me to explain, without being clear
    as mud.
     
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