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How do I add another router to my home network to extend my wireless range?

Discussion in 'Networking' started by senna, May 30, 2011.

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  1. senna

    senna Thread Starter

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    I currently have a TP-Link WR841N as my main wireless router( connects from the cable to modem to TP-Link). I get pretty good range with the TP-Link but the wireless signal doesn't cover my garage area.I was thinking about running a network cable to my garage and hooking up my Linksys WRT54G wireless router so that the wireless signal covers that area.
    What do I need to do to set this up? Is it as easy as just plugging in my Linksys router to a network cable and then just being able to connect a laptop wirelessly? It would be great if I could just walk outside and as I moved toward the garage the laptop would just pick up the new routers wireless signal. But if that isn't possible or requires to much then I would be ok with having to just switch and reconnect to the Linksys router everytime I went to the garage.
    Thanks for all your help.
     
  2. etaf

    etaf Moderator

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    make sure you get an electrician to check out the cable - lots of issues can be caused by running a cable between buildings. also damage to equipment during storms, fire etc


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    Connecting two (or more) SOHO broadband routers together

    Connecting two (or more) SOHO broadband routers together
    Shamelessly stolen from a John Will Post :)

    Note: The "primary" router can be an actual router, a software gateway like Microsoft Internet Connection Sharing, or a server connection that has the capability to supply more than one IP address using DHCP server capability. No changes are made to the primary "router" configuration.

    Configure the IP address of the secondary router(s) to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address, 192.168.0.253 for another router, etc.

    Note: Do this first, as you will have to reboot the computer to connect to the router again for the remaining changes.

    Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

    Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router, channels, encryption, etc.

    Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. Leave the WAN port unconnected!

    This procedure bypasses the routing function (NAT layer) and configures the router as a switch (or wireless access point for wireless routers).

    For reference, here's a link to a Typical example config using a Netgear router

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  3. senna

    senna Thread Starter

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    Sorry when I said cable I meant coax cable coming into the house(like for the tv). That comes into the house for my internet and then that goes to my modem then to my tp-link router.

    Ok, So my tp-link router is my main router. I have provided a screen shot of it's settings.
    My IP range is 192.168.1.100 thru 192.168.1.199. with my subnet of 255.255.255.0
    My Linksys is my secondary router. I went into my Linksys and
    made the Ip address 192.168.1.200 with a subnet of 255.255.255.0
    I made sure they were both set to channel 1 with the same ssid.

    I then connected a stragiht-thru networking cable from port 4 from the TP-link( primary router) to port 2 on the Linksys router(secondary router). I then took my ipad out to the garage and still couldn't get a signal.

    Can I make the ssid on the secondary router different than the primary ssid so I know when I connect to it or does it have to be the same?
    Does the network cable from port 4 on the tp-link to port 2 on the linksys have to be a crossover? If so, then I won't be able to do that until I can go to work tomorrow and get the crimpers and everything for that.
    I have included a few screen shots of my settings.
     

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  4. senna

    senna Thread Starter

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    Wanted to add one more screen shot.
     

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  5. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    You can use the same or different SSID--your choice. If you use the same SSID use the same type encryption and encryption key. Use different (non-interfering) channels.

    A cross-over cable is needed if and only if neither router has auto-sensing (MDI/MDIX) ports.
     
  6. senna

    senna Thread Starter

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    Thanks.
    Ok, so it is ok to use the same encryption key for both Routers? I would use a WEP key for both.
     
  7. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Yes. What do you have that doesn't support WPA?
     
  8. senna

    senna Thread Starter

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    Hmm, I don't think anything. Not sure about the Ipad but I would assume it would support it. I will try WPA instead.
     
  9. senna

    senna Thread Starter

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    On the Linksys I am able to set the WPA TKIP password.
    But on the TP-Link it is asking for a Radius Server IP:

    I have no idea what that is.
    I took a screen shot of what my options are. I thought the WPA/WPA2 was what I wanted.
    Would it be one of the other options??
    I took a screen shot of what it says.
    Thanks.
     

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  10. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Use WPA(2)-PSK. WPA(2)-Radius requires a big server that only companies can afford or need.
     
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