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How do I save data to a blank CD?

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Malibu7, May 14, 2006.

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  1. Malibu7

    Malibu7 Thread Starter

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Hello again, everyone:

    Question: How do I save data files to a blank CD? Second question, if the blank CD holds 700mg. can I continue adding files to it (at different times) until the blank CD is filled to capacity?

    I asked this question a couple of days ago, but I only got one reply, but it did not answer the question I am trying to find out "How do I save data-files to a blank CD. Anyone out there who can help, I sure would appreciate it if you can give me some specific info on how to do it. Also, would appreciate it if you can answer question #2 (above).

    Thanks in advance for your help,

    Respectfully,

    Malibu 7
     
  2. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2003
    Messages:
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    Hi Malibu7,

    Saving files to a CD:

    1) you need a writable CD drive in your computer
    2) you need a CD that is writable, i.e. either a blank CD-R (a CD which is recordable only once) or a CD-RW (a re-writable CD) for saving your files, not a read-only CD-R that has already been written.

    Saving Files to CD example:

    To write information to a CD, follow these steps:

    1. Create a document in the application of your choice (Microsoft Word, WordPerfect etc.) and save it to My Documents.
    2. Close your file.
    3. Insert a CD to be recorded into the CD drive, e.g. drive ( E: ).
    4. Select My Documents from the application menu.
    5. Click on your file and select File > Send To > CD Drive ( E: ).
    6. Click on the arrow beside the drop-down menu that displays My Documents and select Drive E.
    7. Select File > Write these files to CD.
    8. When writing is complete, eject your CD from the drive.

    Here is a link to a very good description of what you want:
    http://www.students.ucs.ed.ac.uk/helpdesk/student/system/show.cfm?documentID=2745

    With regard to question #2, what you are asking is - is it possible to append files to the end of the last file written to the CD? I suppose depending on the software used to record the files to the CD, there might be third-party products out there that can append files to the end of the CD - and I believe Nero can do that. Here are two links for using Nero:
    1) Saving files to a CD - Using a new CD-R?
    http://www.swan.ac.uk/lis/computing/open_access/cd_burning_new_cd.asp
    and
    2) Adding files to an existing CD-R
    http://www.swan.ac.uk/lis/computing/open_access/cd_burning_old_cd.asp

    -- Tom
     
  3. BillMichxx

    BillMichxx

    Joined:
    May 15, 2006
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    Hi Malibu7,

    In addition to Tom's detailed response, here's a bit more info.

    If you don't have a built-in CD burner, you can get external ones that connect via USB or Parallel connectors. I use parallel, as old a technology as it is, and works very well.

    One manufacturer was Microsolutions (Micro-Solutions.com). Unfortunately they are now out of busniness, but they maintain their website which has an great amount of useful info.

    You can still get their burners on Ebay. I've bought several that way. Microsolutions also has a very easy to use burner program (SPEEDYCD) -- available on their site. I use their 'Bantum' models (smaller), by moving them around among several laptops I use as required. In fact, I have one continuously connected to my desktop which I use for backups (desktop only has room for one built-in, and that's just a CD reader). Whole deal works very well. (Also for copying CDs.)

    If you need/want more info, just ask.

    Bill
     
  4. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    106,418
    I'm at a loss as to why anyone would buy an old and slow parallel interfaced CD-RW drive when USB interfaced models are dirt cheap. Why would you search out an obsolete product from a company that's out of business for a new purchase? :confused:

    A USB 2.0 interfaced CD-RW or DVD writer will be many times the speed of a parallel interface unit, requires no drivers on ME/2K/XP, and is compatibile with a wide variety of free and commercial burning software. This choice is a no-brainer to me.
     
  5. Rich-M

    Rich-M

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    22,443
    yeah there are so many usb and firewire cdrw's out there of quality...that's where you need to be if you do not have an internal burner, though internals are really easy to install. 2 plugs and 2-4 screws is all...and the "jumper" setting which we can walk you through.
     
  6. BillMichxx

    BillMichxx

    Joined:
    May 15, 2006
    Messages:
    12
    Re: mentioning older external CDRW units

    Firstly -- Well, there are *lots* of reasons to suggest what I did. Primarily, they work -- not only for more modern systems, but for older systems that many people still use. Plus, much such older technology is still available and can be more affordable. Not all computer users are as sophisticated as the Moderator thinks.

    I just think folks should be made aware of what is available. Once they know there are choices, then they can choose more intelligently.

    'Middlely' -- I'd like to expand on my earlier offering and give a bit more useful content about the subject, before I go.

    I still contend that Microsolutions, even though no longer active in business, left a legacy line of *still* useful peripherals. Extremely well made and therefore long lasting, and, there are parallel, USB and PC Card interfaces available. Their parallel line of external CDRW, CD readers, Hard and floppy drives all work using *one* single, common driver. Load that one program, on anything from Windows 95 through XP, and most any type will work immediately when connected. That makes it very easy to move information between older equipment, some of which simply does not have USB or other more 'modern' technology, and newer systems.

    Example: I have about 25 computers, mostly laptops -- 'vintage' up to (fairly) modern. I have very little trouble getting them to 'talk' to each other. No, not networking.

    This is why I would, as the Moderator put it "..search out an obsolete product from a company that's out of business". Actually, I didn't have to 'search out' because I knew, from experience, that products like that were available. It's simply because being aware of a variety of solutions helps in solving problems.

    And, lastly (and I mean lastly):

    When a brand new forum member posts their very first message, they don't expect to be chastised by a forum Moderator. Nor have any well intended offerings poo-pood as being totally useless.

    When I join groups like this, I do so because I think I can help a little. And, once I get involved and get a feeling for the environment, I know better what I can contribute, and then usually donate to help them along also.

    There are many forums, and platforms, for providing help to all levels of computer user folks. I'm sure some of them would welcome some additional help. I'll just have to look and decide where to put my efforts.

    So, between this and more tolerantly managed forums, as the Moderator said 'This choice is a no-brainer to me'.
     
  7. Rich-M

    Rich-M

    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Messages:
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    Billmichxx,
    I think you are over reacting a bit and taking personally what JohnWill said.
    His comment wasn't personal and you have to remember new users are
    so impressionable that we all worry about how they react to things said by users who state they are experienced. That said as an expierinced user, I seriously doubt you believe that everyone should seek out and use old technology. Machines that don't have usb ports when even the last version of Windows 95 had usb ports are very few and far between these days. In another few weeks Windows 98 and Me will no longer be supported by Microsoft either.
    I have been all over the internet and been on many big forums, and find the mods here so much more professional and actually way more social than mods elswhere. And I think the concern is with progress and future, which with old discontinued hardware, there really is very little to look forward to.
     
  8. Malibu7

    Malibu7 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2005
    Messages:
    16
    Tom:

    Your info on how to add data to a blank disk, was the most concise, easy-to-understand info that I have ever had on this website, which is saying quite a lot. Also, the websites that you mentioned were perfect in further explaining how to add data files to a blank CD.

    I am definitely adding you to my buddy list.

    Thank you so much for the info,

    Respectfully,

    Mike (a.k.a. Malibu 7)
     
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