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How do they do this

Discussion in 'Random Discussion' started by telecom69, Sep 20, 2008.

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  1. telecom69

    telecom69 Gone but never forgotten Thread Starter

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    Below is a pic of a spiders web in my garden,nothing remarkable in it at first sight I agree,but what is remarkable to me at least is how did this spider attach the support threads for the web ? on the left side there are just two,but they are 4ft long,the ones on the right are just 2 ft long,what is intriguing me is how on earth did this spider get across that 4ft gap,not once but twice to attach those strands,Im baffled :confused:

    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  2. buffoon

    buffoon

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    They use the wind to make the initial supporting thread. They release an intial thin sticky thread which is then blown by the wind until the end sticks somewhere (either starting from your bushes and blowing towards your shed or vice versa). Sometimes they do this twice (2nd thread starting a bit lower. Then they move along the first (usuaslly only) line carefully, reinforcing it as they go. They may go back again and reinforce it anew until it is strong enough to support the net (to be built). They then proceed to attach a Y-shaped thread (actally at first it is another thread fixed first to one point along the supporting line, given a lot of slack while the spider moves along and then fixed again, hanging down loosely as a loop. They can move down this, their weight tightening the loop into a form of triangle). At bottom they let off another thread which the wind will stick somewhere, go along and reinforce it. Foundations laid, time to build the web. They can fix it with as many strands as deemed necessary by moving along the initial support line to its end, emitting thread as they do, climbing lower, attaching it (bush or shed), reinforcing it as above and then returning to the job.
     
  3. telecom69

    telecom69 Gone but never forgotten Thread Starter

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    Thank you buffoon for that very interesting information,both interesting and astounding (y)I can see the triangles you mention, Ive always liked spiders but now look upon them with even more admiration ...it still irritates a bit when I walk into one of their unseen webs though :D but I suppose thats the object of the exercise for them having them unseen ...amazing creatures :)
     
  4. Gabriel

    Gabriel Account Closed

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    Awesome:eek: ultimate windsurfers for sure
     
  5. Gabriel

    Gabriel Account Closed

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  6. buffoon

    buffoon

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    You may remember having walked thru a treed area and have all these single web threads randomly hanging about covering your eyes, nose etc. as you walked thru them. some hang from trees, one end loose, others actually attached to two points. That's when the wind picked up strong while the spider emitted them. She eventually got fed up with the other end connecting nowhere and cut them adrift. Interestingly enough, they
    eat their own threads up again, when making the web (those that are no longer necessary,once the web is done) or during repairing. Seen them do it. Could watch it for hours.

    :)Nice to meet a fellow spider fan(y)
     
  7. telecom69

    telecom69 Gone but never forgotten Thread Starter

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    Thanks for the further information, like I said Ive always liked spiders but its opened up a new interest for me now :) Ive been doing a lot of searching about them on Google and its surprising just how many different species there are and indeed how many habitate specific areas,like for instance I read that there can be up to half a million in an ungrazed pasture, astounding, surprised to find its their breeding season now in the UK anyway,with the nights becoming colder and darker earlier, by the end of next month it will be quite dark by 6pm due to their policy of messing with daylight hours etc, makes you wonder how the young spiders survive the Winter ...

    Thanks also to gabriel for the link on how to preserve their webs if need be,fascinating reading ...
     
  8. buffoon

    buffoon

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    Whereas a lot can hibernate (especially in the coler further North, where you are) lots of older spiders don't make it. That's why they breed now. The younger ones do make it thru the winter.

    Ever seen a spider throw a lasso (of sorts)? have a look.
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=2UfMJJAzvbI
     
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