How Do We Fix Crappy U.S. Broadband?

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FCC's underwhelming-looking broadband plan also tardy.

The FCC's year-long effort to write a National Broadband Plan has hit a snag, and the agency wants a four-week delay. But will another month actually give us a "bold" plan?

-- Tom
interesting thread, Tom
from your article
Time to reset the game clock on the National Broadband Plan.

The plan, due to be presented to Congress next month, now looks to be delayed by a month. Like a tardy student going to a professor, the FCC has written Congress to ask for a four-week extension on its "big paper." Perhaps the agency can use the extra time to ensure the plan contains some of that "change" we've heard so much about.
this "change" was expected -and then kicked around- since the telecommunication act of '96....there's a thread {the feds and broadband} in CD that explores the polticial and economic roadblocks to that change: much of it has been touch on here

imo, it boils down to this from the nytimes article you posted a page or so back
Competition, or the lack of it, goes a long way to explaining why the fees are higher in the United States. There is less competition in the United States than in many other countries. Broadband already has the highest profit margins of any product cable companies offer. Like any profit-maximizing business would do, they set prices in relation to other providers and market demand rather than based on costs.
it's good to see that a new administration and a new FCC honcho are once again addressing the mandate from the telecommunication act of '96, that for at least a decade was ignored by the FCC in it's efforts to satisfy the big providers' desire to define content by delivery system
 

lotuseclat79

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FCC unveiling sweeping national broadband plan.

Communications regulators are unveiling a sweeping proposal to overhaul U.S. broadband policy. Their aim: to bring affordable, high-speed Internet connections to all Americans and make access much faster for people who already have broadband.

FCC unveiling sweeping national broadband plan (Update).

More corners of the country would have high-speed Internet access and existing connections would become much faster under a sweeping proposal to overhaul U.S. broadband policy that is being unveiled Tuesday.

FCC to Release Ambitious, But Pragmatic, National Broadband Plan.

The FCC is set to share the nation’s first official broadband plan with Congress Tuesday — a sort of Declaration of the Internet that seeks to ensure that a fast broadband connection is just as much an unalienable right as life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

Want To Know How Meaningless The FCC's Broadband Plan Is? No One Is Upset By It.

There was lots of press coverage about the FCC's broadband plan on Monday, as the commission released an exec summary of its nearly 400-page plan for broadband in the US. If you want to wade through the details, it's all there online for you. But, if you want a basic summary, it appears that, like pretty much everything this FCC is doing, it's a lot of talk and little of consequence.

-- Tom
 

lotuseclat79

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Do You Want to Pay a 'National Broadband Fee'?.

The recently released national broadband plan has grand ideas for hooking people up to high-speed Internet. But the plan also crafts a solution to a problem officials have been trying to solve since 2001 – interoperable communications.

On the other hand, the plan also floats the idea of a "national broadband fee," paid for by taxpayers.


-- Tom
 
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Part of the reason why the US's internet is so bad is because of the shear size of our country in area and the time in which we began to implement internet. If you take the countries that have well developed internet access to it's citizens it's because of a few reasons.

The first being the area needed to cover. An exampled is Japan. It's small compared to the US. It's small compared to many countries which means less cable runs or distances wire has to be implemented.

Another reason is the time in which it was developed. The US began the internet race as we all know so just like our 100 year old water/waste infrastructure that's about to throw this country into the dark ages our internet infrastructure is old too and is in dire need of upgrading. Because of this we started using the first available thing without really developing the technology first. Through advancements in technology by the time many other countries began their development newer much more efficient technology was available of which they took advantage of. This also began to cause us to use different technologies across the board so compatibility became an issue. How do to you interconnect different types of infrastructures?!

My last point is government controlled expansion. There was little control over our internet providers and even now still is other than the idea of deterring monopolization. In many countries the government is the one who created a company of their own and with heavy regulations began their internet craze. Even though our country tries not to they are only impeding progress in many aspects and this is one of them.

Verizon is in the process of selling off all their phone lines to Frontier Communications. This is so they can focus on their FIOS development. Because the use of FIOS is relatively new to us in the consumer side of the house and because of the area needed to cover it's going to be a very slow process of getting such speeds to many of the US's subscribers. Copper when exposed to elements degrades over time and is expensive to continually repair. Fiber is expensive to first implement but generally does not degrade over time so has a better cost turn around when it comes to repairs. Most repairs done to the copper lines isn't due to breakage from digging or accidents such at that it is due to the degradation of those lines.

In essences it is time to begin implementing new technology such as FIOS that has far better results with less downtime than our aging copper system. I apologize if I might have restated any information already in the article. I'll be honest I only read the first few lines but since I already had previous knowledge of the subject decided to post my opinion.
 

lotuseclat79

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Competition missing from broadband plan, some say.

The sweeping national broadband plan that federal regulators delivered to Congress last week doesn't go far enough to satisfy some experts who warn that the United States would still trail other industrialized nations in prices and speed.

The proposals in the broadband plan the Federal Communications Commission delivered to Congress last week don't go far enough for many public interest groups and other observers who warn that the U.S. is trailing other industrialized nations with faster Internet connections and lower broadband prices.
-- Tom
 

lotuseclat79

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The Real Truth About Broadband Speeds.

Thinking about getting broadband Internet? Might want to think again. Not only is there a lack in standard for acceptable broadband service, there's not even a standard definition of what constitutes broadband. Although its data is incomplete, the FCC cites private research indicating that broadband customers aren't getting what they paid for.

-- Tom
 

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