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How do you identify the type of CD?

Discussion in 'Multimedia' started by Fractalogic, Apr 27, 2012.

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  1. Fractalogic

    Fractalogic Thread Starter

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    Hi everyone!

    I was just wondering, is there a simple way of telling what type of CD you got? No, I don't mean the physical formats like CD-R vs. CD-RW. You know, there are so many ways of burning CD discs, I'm talking about the different writing modes. How do you tell if it is a "data" CD or a "video" CD (VCD) for instance?

    Is there a software application perhaps that can identify the CD type?

    Thanks!
     
  2. valis

    valis Moderator

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    all cd's are pretty much the same......once data is burned on it, at that point in time it becomes a music disk, or a data disk, or a video disk.......but until then, they are just blanks.
     
  3. stantley

    stantley

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  4. Fractalogic

    Fractalogic Thread Starter

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    I know that Windows Explorer changes the icon of the optical disk drive in the Computer view, depending on the type of data stored on the disc. If you put an Audio CD in it will say "audio cd" and the icon with the music note shows up. If you put a software CD in it will just show the icon of the setup program. (Also, if you put a DVD film in it will just say "DVD".)

    But other than that, there is really no way telling what type of disc it is?...

    I also notice that the file system for them all is "CDFS". So it's probably like you say they are all the same after burning. But still, you can't really "play" a data CD in a standalone player like a CD player or a DVD player. Unless of course it contains some audio or video files that the player can play, and also read from that (physical) type of disc (CD-R, RW, etc).

    Does evry CD become a CD-ROM when you try to read it in a computer?...
     
  5. stantley

    stantley

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    Once you finalize a CD no more data can be written to it so then it becomes Read-Only.
     
  6. Fractalogic

    Fractalogic Thread Starter

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    For a data CD (RW) I burned years ago it says Data CD (mode 1). For a drivers CD to a HP printer it says also Data CD (mode 1). But here the disc status is said to be closed and finished, while for the disc I burned it said open (open session disc that is).

    For a DVD film it said DVD-video. It even identified the type of copyprotection used, how many layers it is and what video format it is. So this is pretty cool.

    Is this tool really for free? I know that it was previously included as part of the Nero suite, which is not free. This is pretty much what I was looking for - a way to show a little bit more detailed information on what type of disc I insert.
     
  7. stantley

    stantley

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    Yes, it's always be free, you can still get it at the Nero website.

    But since you have Vista I gave you a link to version 5 which is easier to use than the current version 11 because you don't have to install the program.
     
  8. Fractalogic

    Fractalogic Thread Starter

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    But they are not really CD-ROM per say, are they?...

    For my trusty old Nec ND-3520AW it says that it can read DVD-ROM, but it cannot write DVD-ROM. There is a checkmark in the Read column for DVD-ROM but an X in the Burn column for DVD-ROM. Perhaps it is a mistake?...

    In the CD section there is no mention of CD-ROM at all, not as a reading format nor a writing format. Maybe because a burned, closed and then fnilized CD-R is actually a CD-ROM?

    How do the big production companies like game publishers create their "CD-ROM" discs? Or how does a company like HP press their drivers to CDs? What kind of discs are they using? What type of writing mode are they using? I'm just curious... I know they have machines for this kind of thing for high volume pressings, but it would be cool to know how they do it. Perhaps someone can get me a guided tour to HP manufacturing plant in Germany? :) I assume the drivers discs are produced on the same location.
     

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  9. Fractalogic

    Fractalogic Thread Starter

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    I would actually like to have this easily accessible all the time so I would prefer to install it. I just downloaded and installed it fron Nero website.

    http://www.nero.com/eng/downloads-free-tools.php

    I notice that the installed version is quicker at identifying drives on start up, and it also allows you to view installed Windows software and updates which the standalone version does not.

    Thanks!
     
  10. Elvandil

    Elvandil

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    Besides the other information, the file system in use is important, too. Besides the 6 or so versions of UDF in use, there is ISO9660, Joliet, HFS, FAT (Yes, it is used on CD's), Vista's and 7's Live File System (largely UDF), Rock Ridge, CD-i, El Torito (really an addition to ISO), etc. Some disks have more than one, like video disks which are ISO/UDF hybrids. They all have advantages and disadvantages, and particular uses where they are strong.

    It's a good idea to be aware of these possibilities. In practice, and at the risk of being a Luddite, I use ISO for most everything since it is an old one that can be read by all computers and drives. But UDF is useful, too, and I use it more often lately, often as a hybrid with ISO. Microsoft's disks are all UDF, with some having an ISO file system added for compatibility.
     
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