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How I Find Out My DHCP Hostname?

Discussion in 'Networking' started by Battygurl, May 13, 2006.

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  1. Battygurl

    Battygurl Thread Starter

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    Forgive my ignorance,I tried to google for answers,thanks in advance!! :confused:
     
  2. TerryNet

    TerryNet Terry Moderator

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  3. Battygurl

    Battygurl Thread Starter

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    Thanks!
    I was askin the forum, i dont know the answer :/
     
  4. wacor

    wacor Banned

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    maybe it might help to ask you in what context you are asking the question?

    in other words what makes you ask the question?
     
  5. hewee

    hewee

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  6. CarlssonMB

    CarlssonMB

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    Maybe you mean dns hostname?
     
  7. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79

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    Hi Battygurl,

    Good question!

    First, for the sake of discussion, let's assume you are on a corporate network - for a company named XYZ. The Internet website would be something like: http://www.XYZ.com. Within the Intranet (internal network of the company), your computer is given an identifying name, say: battygurl, so your hostname on the Intranet would be: battygurl.XYZ.com, and it would be given a specific Intranet ip address with which it would be associated. Then if battygurl were also your user account name, then your email address on the Internet would be: [email protected] and XYZ's internal software would be able to resolve from your account that when you retrieve your email, it is delivered to your computer named battgurl.XYZ.com to the email account named battygurl.

    DHCP or Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol works like this: for each session that a computer comes up on a network, it doesn't know its TCP/IP address, so it broadcasts to the entire segment its on once to say "I need an ip address" which the DHCP server on its segment supplies. DHCP reduces the number of duplicate ip addresses on a network. In the good old days, administrators used to assign internal ip addresses, and as a consequence, duplicate ip addresses would occur - due to human error.

    The ip address in effect is leased for the session. When the lease runs out, the workstation software must broadcast again for an ip address.

    Your computer's hostname is associated with the ip address. WINS or other server software running on the internal network resolves your computer's ip address and other remote computers ip addresses vs their hostname. Its all TCP/IP related.

    You can open up a command prompt window and execute the command: hostname.exe
    to find out its name. In the example above, it would, of course, be: battygurl

    In Linux/Unix, to set your hostname involves two things:

    1. "hostname <whatever>" to set the hostname for the current session, and
    2. The "HOSTNAME=" line in /etc/sysconfig/network

    -- Tom
     
  8. CarlssonMB

    CarlssonMB

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    Well that covers everything, nice explanation lotus
     
  9. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79

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    Hi CarlssonMB,

    I believe DNS hostnames resolve Internet domain names for hosts with names to route Internet traffic accordingly by the major components of the ip address, and hostnames and Intranet hostnames are resolved otherwise by the internal DHCP, WINS or other name servers keeping track inside the Intranet to route the traffic internal to a network within the domain - if I am not mistaken.

    For example, 217.205.4.69 would identify the company as the first two numbers assigned to the company, the 3rd number would identify the 4th subnet within the company, and the last number would identify a particular workstation on the 4th segment, i.e. identified by 69. My point is that DNS servers would only be interested in the first two numbers of the ip address in order to route any communication around the Internet to/from the workstation.

    -- Tom
     
  10. TerryNet

    TerryNet Terry Moderator

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    Thanks lotuseclat79!

    So, in short, for us Windows amateurs, the DHCP Hostname is what is termed "Full computer name" on the Computer Name tab of My Computer Properties. At least, that's the name that was shown when I executed 'hostname' in a Command Window. Thanks again.
     
  11. CarlssonMB

    CarlssonMB

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    dhcp hostname = FQDN?
     
  12. valis

    valis Moderator

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    what i got too.
     
  13. Couriant

    Couriant Trusted Advisor

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    nope.

    That's SERVER01.MICROSOFT.COM as appose to SERVER01.
     
  14. CarlssonMB

    CarlssonMB

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    nevermind, I see, just the machine name
     
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