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HOw to Connect wifi broadband to Wifi Router

Discussion in 'Networking' started by ellie21, Jul 26, 2017.

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  1. ellie21

    ellie21 Thread Starter

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    I just want to know if its possible to connect your wifi broadband to wifi router? and if it is, How?
     
  2. LIS333

    LIS333

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    I may be misunderstanding you but if you're getting WiFi out of your broadband appliance already, you don't need a router. If you do want to use a WiFi router, you're not going to be using the WiFi signal from the broadband appliance.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  3. ellie21

    ellie21 Thread Starter

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    ahm! its kinda like this, i have a pocket wifi and a router that doesn't have a wifi. i want the wifi on my pocket wifi to be able to connect to my router. Is that even possible?
     
  4. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    The pocket wifi is, in part, a wireless router. It creates an infrastructure wireless network, which means that devices with the proper wireless capabilities connect to it. It does not connect via Wi-Fi to other devices. Since your router does not have Wi-Fi capability it cannot connect to a wireless network.
     
  5. XeoNoX

    XeoNoX Banned

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    yes it is possible but not recommended as you may end up running "double NAT " and its just very impractical to do that.

    [irrelevant words deleted by mod]

    I just want to know if its possible to connect your wifi broadband to wifi router?
    i will assume you mean "your wifi enabled broadband device to a seperate wifi enabled router" ... the answer is yes you can connect your wifi broadband to wifi router
    and if it is, How?
    you can try connecting the LAN port of your "wifi broadband" device to the WAN port of your "wifi router"

    NOTE: once again this is not recommended as you may have issues and may possibly be double NATTING and mots people would consider this not properly setup correctly if you do that.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 27, 2017
  6. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor

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    XeoNox,

    Having a double NAT is not a big deal with inside out traffic flows. The only time where it presents a challenge and it's still doable is if you're doing port forwarding in a double NAT situation. I find it hilarious you're flagging a double NAT as being an issue when you go about recommending a VPN tunnel to move traffic between two LAN segments in the same physical location.
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2017
  7. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor

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    OP,

    Terry is correct in his reply. More specifically, the pocket wifi device sounds more like a MiFi device. I assume this device is using a cellular carrier to get Internet service like Verizon, Sprint, or AT&T. If you want to use a router to distribute the service to more devices, there are some routers out there which has a WiFi as WAN functionality. Cradlepoint supports this.

    But the MiFi devices I've seen will support at least 5 wireless clients. For the MiFi I have, there's a hack to the config file which I can allow more. But there is a practical limit as to how many devices should be connected to a device like this along with the performance constraints of sharing a cellular connection.
     
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  8. 123Zbyniek

    123Zbyniek

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    Depending on the type of MiFi (input - RJ45, WiFi, 3G / 4G, output - RJ45, WiFi / quantity) and router type (eg WiFi only) it is possible if it can work in WISP mode (it receives WiFi signal and broadcasts WiFi signal) .
    I use this solution in case of main network failure - MiFi + 3G modem -> TP-LINK MR3020 router (in WISP mode) -> WiFi devices (laptop, tablet, desktop).
    upload_2017-7-28_13-2-53.png

    P.S.
    MR3020 also have USB port for 3G ( I am using to connect a modem from an alternative network).
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
  9. XeoNoX

    XeoNoX Banned

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    @zx10guy it can be quite a problem IF its a modem w/ router and it sets to 192.168.1.1 first before it acquires isp's ip and he hooks up another router that has the same ip and that is quite common that happens with people that dont know any better in the real world (if u deal with alot of people)
     
  10. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor

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    You're now bringing up a totally different problem than a purely technical discussion. What you're talking about is a configuration/user expertise problem which no matter what solution you propose is going to be a problem. I'm not sure what bearing acquiring an DHCP address has on the internal network as it has none.

    I use a double NAT configuration all the time. The setup I'm using that has double NAT is a secure remote layer 2 extension technology. I've demo'd this solution for many of my clients looking for an easy method of extending a secure layer 2 connection to a remote location. Many times when I travel, I take this solution with me which primarily consists of an ultra portable PC from Fujitsu with ICS set up on it. I leverage the wireless NIC on it to connect to either my Verizon MiFi or public hot spots such as in the hotels I stay in. The wired connection goes to my Aruba RAP that automatically establishes an IPSEC tunnel back to my home network. And through GRE encapsulation I have layer 2 extension, which means I can be hundreds/thousands of miles away and have a connection to my home network like I'm sitting at home. The extension works for both wired and wireless (as I have 3 of the SSIDs configured at home to broadcast remotely). I have also taken my Cisco IP phone with me and connected it to my RAP. The IP phone registers to my call manager and allows me to make phone calls using my home's land line service anywhere I have Internet service. So the double NAT situation this creates as my MiFi uses 192.168.1.0/24 and the ICS setup uses another block (I forget what private addressing it uses) has caused zero problems.

    I used to have my ASA 5505 connected behind my TZ400W in a double NAT situation too. In fact, the NAT overload I had set up on the 5505 was taking 3 different subnets and NATing it to a single private external address to the TZ400W. Again no issues there either and I ran this setup for years back when I had another ASA 5505 as my edge firewall, to the TZ205W, to the TZ215W, and now the TZ400W.

    And the comment about if I deal with a lot of people, yes. In my career, I've dealt with hundreds to thousands of people which used networks and systems I've put together. Now that I'm in a consulting role, I work with people that are managing systems which support thousands of corporate users with some of their systems providing publicly facing service which means hundreds of thousands of public users. How about you?
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
  11. XeoNoX

    XeoNoX Banned

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    was just giving u a example where it could be a issue, please read my original post as it clearly stated:

    NOTE: once again this is not recommended as you may have issues and may possibly be double NATTING and mots people would consider this not properly setup correctly if you do that.

    please re-read that i did say MAY

    Best Regards,
    XeoNoX
     
  12. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor

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    Spin it anyway you want. May is not even a possibility. There is no issue running a double NAT in normal inside out traffic flow as I've stated repeatedly. This is another example you showing that you don't understand basic network protocol operation. In this case NAT overloads. If you understand how NAT overload works, you will realize there is no possibility of any network issues having a double NAT situation. In my example, my double NAT didn't even affect my ability to establish an IPSEC tunnel.

    You just need to just back away and stop saying more things which expose weakness in your knowledge.
     
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