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How to Refresh TCP/IP in Win 7?

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by rrrld, Nov 19, 2009.

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  1. rrrld

    rrrld Thread Starter

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    Hello

    How do you refresh TCP/IP in Windows 7?

    Is there a command line command eg netsh that you use in Xp/Vista?

    Please outline step by step.

    Thanks.
     
  2. fwbflash

    fwbflash

    Joined:
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    goto Start Programs>Accesories>Command Prompt

    once in command prompt window, the command to release and renew your TCP/IP address/settings is:

    ipconfig /release

    ipconfig /renew

    For other ipconfig command line parameters, type:

    ipconfig /?

    ...and it will give a listing of relevant command line params and an explanation of each.

    Hope this helps...if not you are welcome to hit me up here or with an email.
     
  3. helpful

    helpful

    Joined:
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    NETSH commands:

    netsh interface reset all - clears interface information
    netsh interface ip reset - clears ip settings (Resets TCP/IP)
    netsh winsock reset - resets winsock catalog

    Beware of these commands!

    Reseting your winsock deletes all third party LSP which some antivirus/firewall programs use

    Reseting your ip delete any custom ip settings such as static ip address, dns servers, and any user defined tcp parameters
     
  4. rrrld

    rrrld Thread Starter

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    thanks for that :)

    however, i was wondering if there was a netsh specific command for windows 7 to refresh tcp/ip
     
  5. Kemicaze

    Kemicaze

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    The commands haven't changed much from XP/Vista to Win7... It's basially the same commands!
     
  6. helpful

    helpful

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    The only commands I have noticed changing are additional Ipv6 commands, because now ipv6 is turned on by default in Vista/Windows 7.
     
  7. TerryNet

    TerryNet Terry Moderator

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    Is this what you're looking for?

    (From a JohnWill post)

    TCP/IP stack repair options for use with Vista or 7.

    Start, Programs\Accessories and right click on Command Prompt, select "Run as Administrator" to open a command prompt.

    Reset WINSOCK entries to installation defaults: netsh winsock reset catalog

    Reset IPv4 TCP/IP stack to installation defaults. netsh int ipv4 reset reset.log

    Reset IPv6 TCP/IP stack to installation defaults. netsh int ipv6 reset reset.log

    Reboot the machine.
     
  8. Mumbodog

    Mumbodog

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    netsh winsock reset resets the winsock configuration to default settings

    netsh winsock reset catalog rebuilds the winsock keys (this is the command that will delete any custom LSP's some third party softwares add, you will have to reinstall the software)


    This one documented for XP thru Vista, I assume it works for W7, will rebuild the tcp/ip protocol without removing custom LSP's. Creates a log on the root of C. It rewrites these 2 registry keys
    SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters\
    SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\DHCP\Parameters\

    netsh int ip reset c:\resetlog.txt

    .
     
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