I/O Device Error on secondary drive

Macboatmaster

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I am not sure you are correct that the partition lettered D was ever shown as a partition on the drive which also bears the partition lettered C -the M2.
It does not show such on the disk management window, as far as I can see - it shows D as a partition on Disk 1
Lettering is a windows aspect

Re this
I know that Testdisk DID find the directories and data files on the G drive; it's just taking far too long to copy them to the SSD that is the C drive for this computer.
DO NOT copy the files to the C Drive.
TestDisk will copy corrupt files as well as good ones and if you copy corrupted files to the OS drive you MAY have more problems than you have now.


It certainly does seem as though the problem of the slow performance generally is down to the drive, as having now disconnected it, you say all is OK
as I suggested

If you disconnect the power and data cables to that drive and the system still runs slow with etc.

Now we know the G is the drive from the old computer
That drive was the primary master hard drive for that old computer.
It is possible of course depending on its age that it has failed. I do not think it was mentioned before about it being an old drive.
It is in spite of its possible age, still unusual for a drive to fail WITHOUIT warning.
If on the other hand you have previously received messages that one of your drives neds to be checked for errors etc, from Windows 10 then that of course is a different aspect.

Drives can develop file errors but still be accessible.
When however these file errors are actual bad sectors and IF a file error occurs in the Master File Table for the drive, it can then become inaccessible.
You can consider the Master File Table as the index to the drive. When you want to access something on the drive, it does NOT search the whole drive to find it. It checks the index of the Master File Table and that tells the drive where the file is ON the drive.

Were it to be me I would recover to a drive OTHER than the C - OS drive - eg to the drive shown as Disk0 lettered H
and I would recover to a folder established on the drive - NOT to the root of the drive.

When you get the old computer out of storage presuming it does not now have a bootable drive in it, as you say the drive with the current problems was the OS drive in that computer, you will not be able access it, as of course the drive is not now a bootable drive.

If you deicide to continue with TestDisk please DO NOT recover to C drive.







 

Looker1010

Holly
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I am not sure you are correct that the partition lettered D was ever shown as a partition on the drive which also bears the partition lettered C -the M2.
It does not show such on the disk management window, as far as I can see - it shows D as a partition on Disk 1
Lettering is a windows aspect
Well, whatever the case, whatever the mysterious D drive is, or was, it no longer shows on Disk Management or This PC... and I question whether that's a bad thing, because once I disconnected the G Drive, the computer began booting smoothly once again, and programs that had slow loading times, now load right away, again.



If you deicide to continue with TestDisk please DO NOT recover to C drive.
Well, continuing with TestDisk will mean reconnecting the G drive which cause all the super-slowness problems to resume.

I was thinking of connecting via this USB Dock that you mentioned and seeing if I can move the files over that way-- Any chance that that would work? If you think it wouldn't, I'll call Micro Center and ask if there's anything they can do to transfer the data files to a high-capacity flash drive or something.

then the drive should be recognised on another computer either connected internally SATA I presume or externally in a dock etc.
 

Macboatmaster

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What make and model is the drive you have disconnected = G drive please
 

Looker1010

Holly
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Western Digital WD Blue WD10EALS 1TB 7200 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5"

Unfortunately I don't know exactly where or when I got it. It HAS been a fair number of years, possibly ten.
 

Macboatmaster

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and have you received warnings that the disk needed to be checked for errors - as I mentioned
If on the other hand you have previously received messages that one of your drives neds to be checked for errors etc, from Windows 10 then that of course is a different aspect.
That drive as I am sure you know is a hard drive - in other words it has platters and a read write head
WD Blue WD10EALS 1TB 7200 RPM
ten years for a spinning drive is probably above the average where you could expect failure

Re Connect it and run this
Software and Firmware Downloads | WD Support (wdc.com)
Do not run the offered Western Digital Dashboard as that is written primarily for Solid State Drives
Run the quick test
It will fail it - I think
Run the Extended Test - it will take a long time
IF and it is big IF you are lucky and the drive is failing you MAY just get it to work long enough to recover your data by the normal means of open the folders and copy

IF NOT you are back to TestDisk or putting the drive in the other computer booting it Linux from a USB and seeing if that will find the drive for you and open it
The reason Windows will not open it is the file system is not recognised by Windows that is why it is shown as RAW

CAUTION
It may work - the WD Diagnostics but there are NO guarantees and there CAN be NO assurance that it will not make the situation worse - however that is unlikely.
 

Looker1010

Holly
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Run the quick test
It will fail it - I think
Run the Extended Test - it will take a long time
IF and it is big IF you are lucky and the drive is failing you MAY just get it to work long enough to recover your data by the normal means of open the folders and copy

IF NOT you are back to TestDisk or putting the drive in the other computer booting it Linux from a USB and seeing if that will find the drive for you and open it
The reason Windows will not open it is the file system is not recognised by Windows that is why it is shown as RAW

CAUTION
It may work - the WD Diagnostics but there are NO guarantees and there CAN be NO assurance that it will not make the situation worse - however that is unlikely.
Yes it failed the Quick Test. I am going to wait until later to try the Extended test. The issues with the G Drive cause the WD Diagnostic program to run very very slow.

Please explain the putting the drive in the other computer and booting from USB.

I'm also going to call Micro Center and ask them if there's anything they can do, since they put the rig together for me.
 

Macboatmaster

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The extended test attempts to repair errors whereas the quick test does not
Try it - you have little to lose
I doubt Micro Centre will be able to help you very much as of course the errors on a old hard drive are nothing to do with them assmebling the computer for you

I have asked twice now - have you received warnings that a disk needed to be checked for errors?
BEFORE this apparent sudden failure.
 

Macboatmaster

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Well there are no definite conclusions but it still maybe that the drive is not actually faulty
I recommend you run that extended check
 

Looker1010

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I ran the extended check and about 87% of the way in, it stopped with the message, "Too many bad sectors." I am posting a screen shot at the end of this message. I'm guessing WD DLG has run out of options, then?


Before I resort to Testdisk, which will probably take weeks-- can you please explain the other option you hinted at before, something about "putting the drive in the other computer and using USB?"

EDIT: Here's the screen shot, I forgot to put it in:

dlgdiag.jpg

SECOND EDIT: At this point, this info might not mean anything, but I had to have Data Lifeguard run the disk detection three times before it showed the G drive at all.
 

Macboatmaster

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"Too many bad sectors." I am posting a screen shot at the end of this message. I'm guessing WD DLG has run out of options, then?
You have indeed run out of options except
Test Disk
Perhaps Piriform Recuva - but do not hold your breath
I doubt accessing the drive LInux will help with many bad sectors

Download Recuva | Recover deleted files, free! (ccleaner.com)
use the free version

TestDisk is perhaps your most reliable option - Recuva MAY be faster.

We have made no real progress but at least you know NOW beyond reasonable doubt that the drive is bad.
 

Looker1010

Holly
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It's rather ironic; over twenty years of accumulated data is still on that drive, or so TestDisk says-- I just can't access it. I'll keep trying, a little each weekend, since TestDisk moves so hurtfully slow when the G drive is plugged in-- even changing directories can take an hour of waiting.

I did make SOME progress, though-- by unplugging the drive, not only did I determine it was the culprit, but I fixed the painful slowness with which the computer booted and with which some programs loaded and responded to commands.

And the really good news is that I found some of the data on flash drives. It's far from everything, but if worst comes to worst, it will do.

One last question before I "sign off" on this thread (It's not exactly solved, but has been brought to a natural conclusion): About how often, approximately, do you change drives for new ones? This goes for both hard drives and m.2 SSD drives. I think it's safe to say that I don't want to go through this again :p haha

Holly C.
 

managed

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Personally I don't change drives until one shows some sort of problem and testing that drive fails.
You will probably notice something is wrong or get warned by the Bios or Windows before the drive fails.
 

Macboatmaster

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did make SOME progress, though-- by unplugging the drive, not only did I determine it was the culprit, but I fixed the painful slowness with which the computer booted and with which some programs loaded and responded to commands.
I thought it was me that suggested that with specific reference to see if the computer still runs slowly

Hope you manage to get the data.
I should not pay too much attention to the mentioned 20 years of data
When you delete a file from a drive, the file is NOT actually deleted it is still on the drive.
What you delete is the reference to the file in the Master File Table, which I think I have mentioned before in this topic.
The file remains on the drive, until the space it occupies is written over.

That does not mean that because TestDisk has found reference to files of 20 years etc, they are recoverable.

You may not have read my last suggestion re Recuva - I do not know if you have as of course you have not mentioned it.

As to the life of a drive = no one can give you a real life span in years
spinning drive - 2 to 5 years - can of course be more
SSD -
Understanding SSD Endurance (westerndigital.com)
depends on writes to drive and quality of chips on the drive

Finally as you will now know, and in fact indeed you have mentioned yourself - backup of data you value is your prime protection source.
 

Macboatmaster

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I totally agree with my colleague managed
Personally I don't change drives until one shows some sort of problem and testing that drive fails.
You will probably notice something is wrong or get warned by the Bios or Windows before the drive fails.

Indeed I asked a couple of times
I have asked twice now - have you received warnings that a disk needed to be checked for errors?
BEFORE this apparent sudden failure.
and you replied NO.
It is as I said, so unusual to have no warnings whatsoever of problems - even if not specific messages - one normally sees problems developing.
==============


NOTE
I have just realised that according to your screenshot of the WD tool
the drive in question passed the SMART status
IT MAY just be possible that the drive is recording bad sectors and failing the other tests because of a connection problem - I suggest again that you connect to the other computer or try USB

Your drive warranty
Warranty Status | WD Support


WCATR3268681OUT OF WARRANTYWD10EALS-00Z8A0TAHOE2D 7200 32M SERIAL ATA II 1.0 TB 4HD STD9-Oct-2013
WD Blue drives came with a two year warranty.
 

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