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I want a GOOD monitor for Photoshop work

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by gyrgrls, Oct 28, 2011.

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  1. gyrgrls

    gyrgrls Banned Thread Starter

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    LCD monitors suck. I can't calibrate them. Not even with a SPYDER.

    If I'm gonna spend $1300 on software, then I want a good CRT monitor.
    Money is not an object. I just want a good CRT.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. jiml8

    jiml8 Guest

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    CRT manufacturing is pretty much ending, I think. Would a plasma display work for you?

    How about a true LED display? I'm not referring to the new-generation LCD displays with LED backlights, but a true LED display. They are very very costly and I don't know much about 'em, but you might want to investigate that.
     
  3. Snagglegaster

    Snagglegaster Banned

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    I don't think anybody has color CRT monitors in production anymore. Still, I've seen far more CRT's with crappy color than modern LCDs. I'd suggest looking at reviews in photography magazines/web sites, and I believe you would get more specific info than you're likely to find here. And if you're really serious about accurate color reproduction for professional use, I think that ultimately means devices with support for Pantone software, and Pantone calibration software.
     
  4. gyrgrls

    gyrgrls Banned Thread Starter

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    I use Pantone, for reference, and I use an Intuous tablet, as well.

    You can't tell me that LCD/TFT monitors are better than CRT's, though. It just isn't so.
    I really wish it was. Now, some of the LED backlit models look pretty sharp, but you can't get good color rendition from them, if you're really serious about photography.

    I keep my room lighting at 30 footcandles, and calibrated my monitor, accordingly. But I can't calibrate these newer LCD monitors.

    I don't care if I have to spend $10,000 on a good CRT. But I can't FIND a good one anymore. ;`(
     
  5. gyrgrls

    gyrgrls Banned Thread Starter

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    Thanks, I will check it out.
     
  6. DoubleHelix

    DoubleHelix Banned

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    Since you have an unlimited budget and are into high-end graphics editing, surely you must be part of a community that also does this work. What do your friends/co-workers/etc. use for high-end monitors?
     
  7. gyrgrls

    gyrgrls Banned Thread Starter

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    I pretty much work independently, as a graphics editor, but I do other work as well, like HVAC, electronics, and construction (plumbing, electrical, etc.). One facet alone won't really support itself, let alone me.

    No, i have money from other sources, too.

    However: most old-school graphics editors use something like Trinitron CRTs.
    The fly-by-night photography studios, who do family photos, claim LCD or LED
    monitors are just fine for what they do, because the average customer can't tell
    the difference, once it's printed on a high-end Kodak or Epson printer.
    But it looks terrible on teh screen, and how they calibrate their color workflow,
    I will never know. Trial and error, I guess.


    I used to run my AOC monitors under 30 footcandles of ambient light, from a
    D65 fluorescent source, with a CRI of 79, and then calibrate my CRT in a darkened room..
    My computer room looked like a dungeon when I was photoshopping. If the ambient
    light changed, then all bets were off.

    IOW: commercial family photo outlets use lighting conditions that are close enough for
    horseshoes and hand grenades.

    If it doesn't look well on the monitor, it is then only by trial-and-error that you'll ever calibrate
    your printer, to have good rendition when the prints are viewed under average lighting.
     
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